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Hey everyone...first post on new board, I was on the old one as twotonecustom82....



The last time I changed my oil in the fall before I put the bike away i noticed some flakes in the oil filter housing behind the filter. They were definetly silver...just wondering if this is a sign that other people have encountered. Bike has almost 50 000 km. I've never had the motor apart in this bike but have owned it for the past 6 years, bought with around 20k on it. I've done a few adjustments to the tensioner in the past as per the manual but as said before it's hard to tell if anything is really being adjusted. Here's a pic of the flakes i removed...





 

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hi,and welcome from spain.

yes,that does look like the aftermath of the camchain chewing up the case.time to whip the motor out.

replace the chain etc.a really good clean out of the engine[need to get rid of that swarf]its bad news,if it stays inside the motor
 

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Change the chain and clean out the oil in the rear cover. Within a few oil flushes all of the shavings will be gone.
 

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Welcome back. I agree with above comments. The truly BAD flecks in oil are gold or copper colored, as that indicates engine shell bearings going out, the ones that are nearly impossible to replace, as far as I know.
 

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Its also worth checking that it IS indeed aluminum by getting a magnet. That will at least confirm its not something way worse




I am pretty sure its your cam chain though, my bike was the same way when I got it.





Mike
 

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Magnet won't attract aluminum.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks everyone. You've verified the motor needs to be pulled for me. Thankfully i've got the bike in my storage area at my apartment this winter and can work on it....it's something that should've been started earlier but i will get around to it. I feel confident that i can remove the motor myself but actually tearing into it is another story. Has anyone removed the motor and taken it to a mechanic to have the actual chain replaced? The only downside to that for me is that I wouldn't get to see the inner workings of the mechanism for future reference. This has been an excellent ride for me over the past few years and I admittedly have driven the sh#$ out of it. I love my bike so hopefully i can get it up to par again....
 

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The camchain in these bikes isn't a particularly difficult job if you can pull a spanner at all.



The most special tool required is a 20x1.5 bolt about 100mm long.



All the info required {including the manual} is on this forum and there are many here ready and able to give good advice if you get hung up on something.
 

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thats what Mike meant,by his post


Yup, that is what I meant. Guess I should have been more clear






Mind you, some of the swarf will be alloy case and some will be the steel bolt head... just to confuse things further.



But if at least half of the swarf is alloy I'd go with the camchain.


True, in my engine there was quite a bit more aluminum than steel from the bolt, but good point.





You should definitely give it a shot repairing it yourself - its not too bad, I stripped down the whole bike to take out a foreign object in about 12 hours total, mine took longer than most, b/c I had to remove all the fairing brackets and things like that.



Something I'll remind you about since many people have made this minor mistake, is that if you start to pull the rear cover off, push in on the gear shift spindle, if let it come out with the rear cover, you will ruin a small spring (ask me how I know!)



Good luck if you try it,



Mike
 

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Mike, I think most of us yanked the gear change shaft out the first time we

removed a rear cover
and we try to warn newbies not to do it.

As for the motor

I'd take off the front cover as well and thoroughly clean the case and oil pump strainer

while checking the oil pump chain tension.
 

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do the job yourself.OP.if you have somewhere decent to work,its DIY,i would not trust a mechanic on a time schedule to do this job.sorry if this offends any of you guys.




you have guys here 24 hours a day to guide you through it.



as for the engine.this is my opinion,youl have the front and rear cvers off anyway,i would not be happy simply wiping that much engine killing swarf out.id take it to a garage and blast it out with HPW,cleaning front,rear and as many oilways as i could get to
 

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HPW?

high pressure water??

oooh! dont fancy that much.

pumping white spirit or deisel through is ok but unless you get all the water

dried out PDQ, you may get some sitting and etching a bearing surface.
 

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HPW?

high pressure water??

oooh! dont fancy that much.

pumping white spirit or deisel through is ok but unless you get all the water

dried out PDQ, you may get some sitting and etching a bearing surface.
yep,high pressure water Reg,high pressure steam is better..

the swarf you can see in the 1st post is a lot,if any of that swarf is left in oilways,or anywhere else inside the motor,and get near the shells


by the time the OP cleans the engine correctly,does the required work,moved the motor umpteen times,ill guess[with evaporation and drainage]there wont be a drop left.

if there is,itl be gone on the first 50 mile oil change.

but,like i said,its what i did,and only my take on swarf within
 

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All my engine blocks have been high pressure Water washer blown out and then dried with High pressure Air blown through prior to re-assembly.I would,never leave an engine wet though and have even used a hair-dryer to warm up and dry blocks




HTH
 

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Thanks everyone.  You've verified the motor needs to be pulled for me.  Thankfully i've got the bike in my storage area at my apartment this winter and can work on it....it's something that should've been started earlier but i will get around to it.  I feel confident that i can remove the motor myself but actually tearing into it is another story.  Has anyone removed the motor and taken it to a mechanic to have the actual chain replaced?  The only downside to that for me is that I wouldn't get to see the inner workings of the mechanism for future reference.  This has been an excellent ride for me over the past few years and I admittedly have driven the sh#$ out of it.  I love my bike so hopefully i can get it up to par again....


Take it from somebody with not much mechanic experience, you can do it yourself.  Just take your time, go very slowly, and be methodical.  Mark everything, put all the bolts, screws, nuts, etc. from each step into their own marked containers or bags, and above all else get a manual and read it at least a couple times before you do anything.  I managed to do my chain myself in a basement of the apartment I lived in, the hardest part was actually getting the engine in the door and down the stairs!
 
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