Honda CX 500 Forum banner
1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,275 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I would like to know your opinion about this.



It´s said that nowaday´s cables (clutch, speedo, throttle or whatever) are covered on the inside with teflon.



This is also said to make additional lubing unnecessary. A "guru" even told that lube, with time, will collect dust and grime and make, for instance a clutch cable loose its light action, hence not immediately being fully pulled home by the clutch arm / clutch springs, thus causing clutch slip.



But, my impression is also, that speedo and tach cables (aftermarket) last longer, if they´ve had some thin oil soaked into them from above, before fitting.



Whaddaya say?



Sture
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,535 Posts
Unless the manufacturer specifies "no lube" (which I've never seen, it's usually the opposite, you MUST lube on install because the maker didn't) always lube. Even in modern automotive cable applications (such as sunroofs and convt tops) they recommend lubing the cables at recommended intervals.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,422 Posts
I'm with Cobram.Even if they were super duper cables the coating would fade with time,even teflon.I use Either light machine oil or ACF50,



http://www.mandp.co.uk/productInfo.aspx?catRef=540911



It's one of those rare products that actually lives up to it's Hype.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,275 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I'm with Cobram.Even if they were super duper cables the coating would fade with time,even teflon.I use Either light machine oil or ACF50,



http://www.mandp.co.uk/productInfo.aspx?catRef=540911



It's one of those rare products that actually lives up to it's Hype.




Thanks, both of you. It´s lube, then!



I already have a small bottle of ACF50, which seems to be a rather fantastic product. The UK guys seem to call it "Shuggy juice", after the member who brought the product out in the open for everyone.



ACF50 has already saved me several times from the "Helicoil swamp", as I´ve been wrestling with stuck pin bolts, nuts etc. Some small amount of ACF50, wait for a while (sometimes ovenight) and suddenly they´re open for discussions. Much better than any penetrating oil I´ve used before.



Sture
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,422 Posts
I think some people have tried to belittle the product by calling it ,"Sugar Juice" as it has a pleasant sweet smell which is unusual for most engineering products.We've been using it for years on Aircraft.I used to be able to get it free
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
837 Posts
I use grafite that is used for locks in a liquid form to lubricate all my cables and the tack/speedomitor cables. It's been around a long time. my thoughts.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
851 Posts
Why am I always odd man out? Ha ha, no lube, clean and dry, fair curve and no sharp bends or kinks obviously. They guy I go to to make up cables never uses lube. He said the same, if they're clean and dry they don't need lube. The lube atracks and holds dirt/dust.

Cheers, 50gary
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,535 Posts
The lube also acts as a rust inhibitor. Most motorcycles are seasonal beasts, and spend half their useful lives in storage, or out in the elements. I've had one too many cables go "snap" at the wrong time to risk leaving it to the mercy of the elements. I've never had a failure because a cable wore out from "abrasive particles" stuck to the lube.



I can see why someone selling cables for a living might be inclined to not recommend anti-oxidants be used, or I may just be cynical.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
24,023 Posts
With some synthetic lined cables mineral lubricants will cause the lining to swell thereby "seizing" the cable. Inox appears to be compatible with all types of cable. They do need to be flushed through and relubed as routine maintenance. Motion pro make a good cable lubrication tool but apparently don't lubricate their cables at the factory,-go figure. Clutch action feel heavy? Try a flush and relube.

I beleive that synthetic lined cables should have a band or tracer identifying them as such as this can be a safety issue with things like drum front brakes not releasing after a hard application. It can be the little things that dump you on the road.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
42 Posts
I use a lubricant specifically designed for cables. Forget what it's called, but it's a common brand. Works very well at freeing up a binding cable, and it lasts a while (it doesn't evaporate). I was doing some restoration work on a '76 Corvette back in October. The factory clock had stopped working. Being mechanical, and seeing that it was a bit stiff, I gave the entire workings a good spray with the cable lube (thin, light-weight, and effective). Well, it did too good of a job at fighting friction. The clock is still functional over a month later, and works "too well" as it now gains a couple of minutes every hour. Next time I have the car I'll rectify the problem, but the owner is just happy the clock works at all! ;-)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,422 Posts
The lube also acts as a rust inhibitor. Most motorcycles are seasonal beasts, and spend half their useful lives in storage, or out in the elements. I've had one too many cables go "snap" at the wrong time to risk leaving it to the mercy of the elements. I've never had a failure because a cable wore out from "abrasive particles" stuck to the lube.



I can see why someone selling cables for a living might be inclined to not recommend anti-oxidants be used, or I may just be cynical.


Ditto.Here in the UK we have terrible dank:cold months where there's a lot of moisture in the air.I tend to leave my bikes out and uncovered(I forget to cover) so ACF50 has been a boon.If I see a nut or bolt corroding I just give them a quick wire brush/scotchbrite and then apply some ACF50 same as lubing my cables when I have the carbs off.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Practice:

I've had motorcycles for 40 years and have never seen cables go bad because someone oiled them. I have seen them go bad because they were corroded or because they were stuck and someone squeezed the lever really hard to try to free it up. Snap! I've seen lots of cables brought back to life because they were thoroughly oiled.



Theory:

Oil can damage a few kinds of plastic. Remember from chemistry that "like dissolves like." That being said, when in doubt and if there is plastic involved, use graphite or silicone lubricant. Nylon and acetal plastics can take oil all day long however.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,474 Posts
I use Maxima chain and cable wax to lube cables. Still have a big spray can of it left over from when I rode a chain drive bike. Probably last my lifetime just lubing cables.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,422 Posts
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top