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1982 Honda Silverwing GL500
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I recently got a 1982 Honda Silverwing GL500 but the gas tank has multiple pinhole leaks and a lot of rust inside. I've been trying to patch it with JB Weld and clean the inside with vinegar but I keep finding new holes and just want to get a new tank at this point.

Does anyone know of any tanks that would fit the Silverwing? I've been told a CX500 tank would fit but I have been unable to find one. I'm hoping to spend less than $250 if I can.
 

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'84 CX650E that is evolving into a GL500
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17,475 Posts
My GL500's tank had multiple pinholes too. I couldn't find a replacement but the wrecker I usually deal with suggested I take it to a rad repair shop and have it epoxy lined and 18 years later I'm still using the lined tank.
Apparently it is getting hard to find a rad shop willing to line bike tanks these days but a lot of people have had good results with POR15's tank repair kit so if the one from Keith falls through for any reason and you don't mind working with harsh, smelly chemicals you might want to consider that.

Welcome to the forum. Please add your location and your bike's model and model year to your profile so that you don't have to remember to tell us every time and we don't have to keep asking when you forget (see Forum Settings link in my signature).

And welcome to the world of antique vehicle ownership (they own us, not the other way around). Your bike is about 4 decades old and may or may not have had all of the maintenance necessary to keep it safe & reliable so it is highly recommended to download the Factory Shop Manual for your model (available through the CX Wiki - link in my signature) and go through all of the service procedures, regardless of whether your bike has reached the specified mileage.
I also recommend looking on all rubber parts with suspicion because rubber does not age gracefully. Check the date codes on your tires and replace them if they are over 5 years old no matter how good they look & feel (old rubber simply cannot flow around the irregularities in the asphalt well enough to grip, especially if it is cool or wet). If your bike still has the original rubber brake line(s) (should be replaced every 2 or 3 fluid changes = 5 or 6 years) I recommend shopping for modern stainless braided ones (they last practically forever and double the life of the fluid). And don't forget things like the rad hoses and the boot between the engine and swingarm (they can crack on the bottom where you don't see it).
 

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Registered
1982 Honda Silverwing GL500
Joined
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2 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
My GL500's tank had multiple pinholes too. I couldn't find a replacement but the wrecker I usually deal with suggested I take it to a rad repair shop and have it epoxy lined and 18 years later I'm still using the lined tank.
Apparently it is getting hard to find a rad shop willing to line bike tanks these days but a lot of people have had good results with POR15's tank repair kit so if the one from Keith falls through for any reason and you don't mind working with harsh, smelly chemicals you might want to consider that.

Welcome to the forum. Please add your location and your bike's model and model year to your profile so that you don't have to remember to tell us every time and we don't have to keep asking when you forget (see Forum Settings link in my signature).

And welcome to the world of antique vehicle ownership (they own us, not the other way around). Your bike is about 4 decades old and may or may not have had all of the maintenance necessary to keep it safe & reliable so it is highly recommended to download the Factory Shop Manual for your model (available through the CX Wiki - link in my signature) and go through all of the service procedures, regardless of whether your bike has reached the specified mileage.
I also recommend looking on all rubber parts with suspicion because rubber does not age gracefully. Check the date codes on your tires and replace them if they are over 5 years old no matter how good they look & feel (old rubber simply cannot flow around the irregularities in the asphalt well enough to grip, especially if it is cool or wet). If your bike still has the original rubber brake line(s) (should be replaced every 2 or 3 fluid changes = 5 or 6 years) I recommend shopping for modern stainless braided ones (they last practically forever and double the life of the fluid). And don't forget things like the rad hoses and the boot between the engine and swingarm (they can crack on the bottom where you don't see it).

Thank you for all of the advice! I've already bought new tires but I hadn't thought to check the break lines. I'll be sure to double check all of the parts you mentioned as well as reading through the shop manual.
 
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