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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I havn't been able to put the Idea of using LED's for the 3.4W bulbs to brighten up the controls.



Here is a link I came across, Superbrightleds.com and I can't wait to go home and check out the dims of one of the bulbs we have in the controls console.



Does anyone have those dimensions handy? these may be a little bit longer than the Stanley Stockers...but it would be neat if they worked.
 

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I can tell by looking at the picture that they will fit with no problems, and thanks for finding them as I might be in the market to replace all mine soon too and it makes little sense to put regular 2,000 hour bulbs back in there.



My only concern is whether the light just comes out the front, I think our bulbs depend on having light coming out from the sides to filly illuminate the gauge faces equally and LEDs are more of a point source light.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
My only concern is whether the light just cmes ut the front, I think our bulbs depend on having light coming out from the sides to filly illuminate the gauge faces equally and LEDs ar more of a point source light.


Do a bit of clickin' around in their website Marshall...they have some the have varying beam angles...some focal, some broad...30 deg, etc. they even had some at 90 degrees. I think they even had some with the four colors we would need...Blue, Red, Green, and Yellow/Orange!! I think I will pick some up...would you want to try the colored LED's or the White and count on the colored plastic lenses for the color?
 

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Do a bit of clickin' around in their website Marshall...they have some the have varying beam angles...some focal, some broad...30 deg, etc. they even had some at 90 degrees. I think they even had some with the four colors we would need...Blue, Red, Green, and Yellow/Orange!! I think I will pick some up...would you want to try the colored LED's or the White and count on the colored plastic lenses for the color?
The Blue one is a bit dim... but maybe that's ok for a HighBeam light. Might be worth picking up a white one just in case the Blue one isn't bright enough.
 

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I converted my present Clock bulbs to LEDS some years ago.I made a double led bulb for the clocks.These were bright ones at the time but are not as bright as normal bulbs.Things have moved on since then so there are much brighter ones now.If using for neutral/oil/Main beam use the same colour as the lens.Red shines better through red than white does,Blue through blue etc.

You can get 12v versions but need a resistor if the 3v approx type.



HTH
 

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Hey Shep!




One note: That white one is 4 times brighter in "mcd" then the blue one (blue led is really dim compared to the others), and a white LED is heavy in the blue spectrum anyway. I'm just not sure which would work out better because that blue lens is pretty dark on the control panel. Other then that, I would say get the matching colors just like you did above.



Just a thought.
 

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Hey Shep!




One note: That white one is 4 times brighter in "mcd" then the blue one (blue led is really dim compared to the others), and a white LED is heavy in the blue spectrum anyway. I'm just not sure which would work out better because that blue lens is pretty dark on the control panel. Other then that, I would say get the matching colors just like you did above.



Just a thought.


Yes of course.Blue LEDS were the bane of the TV industry being a lot dimmer than other colours for years.



I don't know if you can get 10mm leds in the the warning lights.



There's some pre-wired 12v ones on our UK Ebay(white/Red/blue/green)



http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/5-x-Pre-wired...al_Components_Supplies_ET&hash=item51982ea3c3
 

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I have been wanting to convert my dash lites to LED's too but not sure of what to get from Superbright. The lamps in my 650 are the #158 2 candlepower. I would go for the white ones but not sure of what intensity I need. I don't want them too bright, especially at night. If any one has an idea of what LED to use I would appreciate it. Superbright sells a good product as I have bought from them before and they ship fast.
 

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I find these to be plenty bright. Shown with 9v... even brighter with 12v source. I'm going to look for the link to my write up. I had written down the radio shack part numbers and the resistors needed for each LED for a 12v source.

EDIT: It's not in the quick reference anymore
Not sure if I will be able to find it now.

EDIT 2:

I used the following:

Yellow Led Part Number 276-0351 QTY=1 uses 1 560 Ohm (not K) resistor eash. Pkg contains 2 LED's

Blue Led Part Number 276-0316 QTY=1 uses 1 470 Ohm resistor

Red Led Part Number 276-307 QTY=1 uses 560 Ohm resistor

Green Led Part Number 276-0022 QTY=1 uses 470 Ohm resistor

560 Ohm Resistors Part Number 271-1116 QTY=1 (package contains 5)

I do not have Radio Shacks part number for the 470 Ohm resistors, Im sorry! They have um though.

This is a neat link for figuring out the resistance needed.

 

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One note: That white one is 4 times brighter in "mcd" then the blue one (blue led is really dim compared to the others), and a white LED is heavy in the blue spectrum anyway. I'm just not sure which would work out better because that blue lens is pretty dark on the control panel. Other then that, I would say get the matching colors just like you did above.


White LEDs are nothing more than blue LEDs with an integral yellow filter or phosphor to make them appear white.



Snipped from Wikipedia:

To emit white light from LEDs requires either mixing light from red, green, and blue LEDs, or using a phosphor to convert some of the light to other colors.



The first method (RGB-LEDs) uses multiple LED chips each emitting a different wavelength in close proximity, to form the broad white light spectrum. The advantage of this method is that the intensity of each LED can be adjusted to "tune" the character of the light emitted. The major disadvantage is high production cost.



The second method, phosphor converted LEDs (pcLEDs) uses one short wavelength LED (usually blue or ultraviolet) in combination with a phosphor, which absorbs a portion of the blue light and emits a broader spectrum of white light. (The mechanism is similar to the way a fluorescent lamp emits white light from a UV-illuminated phosphor.) The major advantage here is the low production cost, and high CRI (color rendering index), while the disadvantage is the inability to dynamically change the character of the light and the fact that phosphor conversion reduces the efficiency of the device. The low cost and adequate performance makes it the most widely used technology for general lighting today.
 

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Be careful, there are LEDs out there now that are bright enough to be a headlight. I got a couple of 265,000 mcd 10 mm white LEDs today and just bare with a 40* beam divergence they'll light up a wall 20' away. I'm adapting them into some really small driving light housings I found at an auto parts store. They have an internal reflector and a focusing lens on the front so that should greatly reduce the beam width thus projecting all that light into a much narrower thus brighter beam.



http://www.goldmine-elec-products.com/prodinfo.asp?number=G16642



They're the brightest LEDs I've ever seen short of the very expensive Luxeons and are the whitest I've ever seen, at 7,000*K they're almost as white as HID lamps. 3.4 - 3.8V means you could hook the pair in series and run them directly off your 7V regulator, I somehow doubt an extra 100 mA is going to hurt it but if it does I've always got my 7V regulator kits which are good for an amp of output current.



It's my guess you'd want around 7,000 - 10,000 mcd output ones to replace the stock gauge lamps.
 

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one thing to remember... a red lens will filter out "red" light. Put a bright red led behind the stock panel and it will disappear.



I like that Ohm's law calculator Nate Dawg...



Your Assignment for class: What would happen if I skip the resistors and just put 4 leds in series?
 

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Your Assignment for class: What would happen if I skip the resistors and just put 4 leds in series?


Depends on the normal forward voltage of the LEDs that can vary from 1.7V up to the 4V area. They'd have to add up to 14.4V and they'd all have to have the same current requirement rating.
 

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Be careful, there are LEDs out there now that are bright enough to be a headlight. I got a couple of 265,000 mcd 10 mm white LEDs today and just bare with a 40* beam divergence they'll light up a wall 20' away. I'm adapting them into some really small driving light housings I found at an auto parts store. They have an internal reflector and a focusing lens on the front so that should greatly reduce the beam width thus projecting all that light into a much narrower thus brighter beam.



http://www.goldmine-elec-products.com/prodinfo.asp?number=G16642



They're the brightest LEDs I've ever seen short of the very expensive Luxeons and are the whitest I've ever seen, at 7,000*K they're almost as white as HID lamps. 3.4 - 3.8V means you could hook the pair in series and run them directly off your 7V regulator, I somehow doubt an extra 100 mA is going to hurt it but if it does I've always got my 7V regulator kits which are good for an amp of output current.



It's my guess you'd want around 7,000 - 10,000 mcd output ones to replace the stock gauge lamps.
You said gauge lamps but what would you look for on the signal/oil/neut/beam indicators?
 

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White LEDs are nothing more than blue LEDs with an integral yellow filter or phosphor to make them appear white.
Are you trying to tell us that it doesn't matter that the White LED listed on that site is 11,200 mcd in intensity(brightness) and the Blue LED is only 2,800 mcd?
 

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This is not how light works Nova,



http://boards.straightdope.com/sdmb/showthread.php?t=561417



I,and many millions of cars/bikes,have RED led Stop/tail lights with no loss of light through red lens.
My cycle is one of them. It has two banks of red LEDs shining through the red lens.



You might be getting confused on the old Lens vs Filter terms. A red Lens would let red light through, where as a red Filter would stop it. Kind of like a set of Blue Blocker sun glasses... The lens is Yellow, but they act as a Blue light Filter.

 

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