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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was just wondering how far over are our bikes supposed to lean when on the kickstand? My 82 Interstate leans pretty far over, and seems to unload a good part of the front suspension when doing so. Also, I have to have the handlebars cocked to the left when leaning the bike. It feels like its on the verge of tipping, but on solid flat ground it stays up (no falls yet). I dont know if someone cut my kickstand down for some reason, but there is evidence that someone did some home welding on it due to the big ugly weld blobs on the stand plate (part thats on the ground) and kick bracket (part that you kick)...sorry, I dont know all the names to bike parts quite yet. Either that, or someone was drunk at the honda factory when they made my bike.



Being short, it makes mounting the bike easier, but I'd rather have it sit a bit more upright and lower the rear to get the same effect if possible. Also, being on the heavier side, it takes a bit more effort to right the bike when the stand is down while I'm straddled on the seat.



I'll get pictures up soon, and I'd appreciate any that you guys might have of your bikes on the stands.



Also, quick sidenote, since I'm too short for the bike, I cant get it on the center stand, so right now that's not an option for me
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Okay, so for a 24 year old dude, I'm surprisingly computer illiterate. Give me a motor and I can tear it down and rebuild it without a problem, but I'm lost in front of a keyboard (and I'm the computer whiz of the family!). Bottom line here is that cant seem to upload the pics to the post, so I did the only other thing I could figure out to do, added them to my photobucket page. Below is the link:



http://s45.photobucket.com/albums/f71/BrokenBeetle66/Honda GL500i/



Hopefully someone can find it in their good graces to put them in the post for me...I would greatly appreciate it. Hopefully the above link works, let me know what y'all think.



Thanks!
 

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Posting a link was good enough but if you want to do it one step better you will see that photobucket has a thing called IMG code. Copy and paste that in.







 

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The lean is a little un-nerving isn't it? My '82 Silverwing leans exactly the same way - hasn't fell over yet! My '81 doesn't lean near that much. I guess the '82s have a different setup.
 

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I'm not sure if it's good or bad because being a photographer I know that cameras lie. But if you think it is to much you should take and cut it in half, put a longer bar in it that puts the kickstand where you think it should be and have it welded up. Another thought is to still cut it and weld a big nut to one side and a section of threaded rod to the other side. Then you can adjust it up and down so it's perfect.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thank you Blindstitch for the upload advice and for posting my pics, much appreciated! I used to be able to do stuff on my Volksrod forum but it's been a few years and this forum is laid out differently.



I'm glad it's not just me that has noticed the extreme angle of the bike on the kickstand. I was thinking to cut the stand and weld a piece in to adjust the height, but I really like stitch's idea with the rod so it's adjustable. One day when I get a few minutes that will be the first project to tackle on this bike.



Right now when I have to service the bike I stick a jack stand under the bolt that's right under the left peg and it keeps it fairly level and stable.
 

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You mentioned being vertically challenged so you were not able to put the bike on it's center stand. I would think that being a little shorter would actually be an advantage doing that. There is a technique to doing it, but once you do it several times, you should have no problem. There is a video around showing a 130 lb lady putting a Goldwing on its center stand and also lifting it back up from a fall.



The idea is to lower the center stand enough to feel that both sides are touching the ground. Then while holding the bike in that position, put your right foot on the center stand bracket. Now while pushing down on the stand with you right foot, use your right hand to grab something horizontal below seat height, lift up and pull back with your right hand. Use your left hand on the handle bar to stabilize the bike.



It is a lot easier to do than describe, the bike will remain stable as long as you keep pressure on the center stand tab with your foot and guidance with your left hand.
 

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I have just the opposite problem with my '81 Interstate. There is just barely enough lean to keep the bike from tipping over the over the other side, and this is with the front wheel kicked all the way to the right to stabilize it. If the ground is leaning at all to the right, I can't park there, and I'm always looking for a left leaning slope. I would actually like to lower my front forks in the triple clamp, but don't dare, as I wouldn't be able park anywhere. In may case I suspect sagging front springs are partly to blame.
 

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Now that I have longer rear shocks and the 18" comstar on my Custom, my bike leans waaaaay over. I carry around a hockey puck and put it under the side stand when I park, works great.
 

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That does seem a bit much, more than my 79 at least. If it were mine I'd be using the center stand most of the time, like Blue said it's actually pretty easy once you learn the trick to it, and MUCH less likely to sink into the pavement on a hot day. Looking at yours, it doesn't seem like it would take much for it to reach the tipping point.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
holy cow it worked! I'm sure it will get easier if I can get it to work more than once, but at least I tried it and after a few frustrated attempts it got up there on the center stand. I think I will practice more with it but will definitely be modifying the kickstand for convenience sake. Having the saddle bags on makes it hard to grab the bike in the rear to pull it up, but I'll figure something out. Good thing you guys chimed in, or else that center stand was coming off the bike as excess weight, now I think I'll be using it.



Thanks for being patient with me
 

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I was going to remove the centrestand on mine until I noticed that this is the easiest bike to put on a centrestand that I've ever owned. Some of my smaller/lighter bikes were a lot more difficult to get up than the CX is.



Incidentally, on one of my CB 450s I've cut the pivot tube on the stand into a channel so the stand can be slipped under the bike when you want to put it up on the stand.



Also a little grinding on the stand in the area that limits it's forward motion to make it 'overcentre' more when it takes the bikes weight for extra security. With the 450 the stand is the first thing that touches down when well laid over for left handers and can lift the rear wheel off the road and dump you.
 

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This is the only pic I have of my wing on the side stand (left in pic), and I'm only at 12+k miles. Plus this is a restoration bike, so the stand was refurbished. With your 70+k miles, it has certainly weakened for a lean like yours. (Weakened may not be the right word, but more free play.) I too have to be careful where I park to get the side stand down and set with enough lean to keep it from going the other way.



Joel in the Couve
 

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Nice video, Juggafat. Thanks for finding and posting it. Another thing that can cause problems are low tire pressures, and compressed forks or shocks. I couldn't get my 650 on the center stand with a completely flat rear tire some time back. And I was helping Showmedude change the shock oil a month back and we had one of the tube caps off. I took it off the center stand and the front forks collapsed enough that I couldn't get the cap and spring back in and couldn't get the bike back on the center stand either. We finally got it with two of us. One pushing from the front, the other using the normal method.





Putting even a 3/4" board under just the rear tire makes a world of difference in how easily the bike goes on the center stand
 

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Ok, here it is. If you look at the tang that the side-stand is attached to, you will probably see wear on the bottom side of that tang. The horseshoe shaped fitting that the center stand bolt goes thru is most likely too wide in play as a result. If you insert a washer in the yoke on the side facing the wear, you will tighten up on the lean.



Not only do I have the same problem, but you have to remove the exhaust system to make this fix as the bolt stops up against it (the exhaust crossover). On the bright side, if it gets loose it will never fall out. Be careful on using the center-stand so that the bike doesn't fall over to the right (as mine did).
 

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Your bike has hard bags to indicate that it's sometimes carries a heavier load and maybe even two up? The PO may have the pre-load at max? Remove all the pre-load and try that also if you're a bit short loosen the triple clamps and slide the forks tubes up about 1/2" (make sure they are both exactly the same and re tighten them. That will make your side stand act longer for less lean angle. You can also buy some shorter Harley shocks.

Cheers, 50gary
 

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Ok, here it is. If you look at the tang that the side-stand is attached to, you will probably see wear on the bottom side of that tang. The horseshoe shaped fitting that the center stand bolt goes thru is most likely too wide in play as a result. If you insert a washer in the yoke on the side facing the wear, you will tighten up on the lean.



Not only do I have the same problem, but you have to remove the exhaust system to make this fix as the bolt stops up against it (the exhaust crossover). On the bright side, if it gets loose it will never fall out. Be careful on using the center-stand so that the bike doesn't fall over to the right (as mine did).


Right. Here's a picture of the kickstand joint from my CX w/3,200 miles:



Here's one from my GL500 w/51,000 miles:





The problem I'm having is with the PO's solution to the wear in the GL's joint, i.e. welding a 3/4" plug on the bottom of the stand:





The kickstand hugs the frame on the way down. Once down, the stand will slide to the left 2-3" and I end up with an OK lean. The problem is that, because of the plug, I have to lean the bike way to the right in order to get the clearance to bring the kickstand down. Feels a little perilous every time.



Like has been said, the H-box blocks the bolt's removal on the GL. The bolt on the CX comes out no problem.
 

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Great video on centerstand use, only missed mentioning to make sure the bike is in neutral, although I suppose that is implied with the use of the front brake. My bike has to be rolled back a good bit onto the stand before the rear wheel is lifted. That provided some frustration back when I was first figuring out how to use it. Between the slightly shorter tire on the 16" rims and sagging forks it was very difficult to get my bike on the centerstand when I first got it. Upgrading to Progressive fork springs made centerstand use easier but the lean angle on the sidestand got scarier.
 
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