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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My CX650TC has a bad stator.

Honda shows the stator as not available.



I did a board search can't find as to who makes the best replacement for a bad stator. I have found a manufacturer called "Electrosport" that sells stators.



Also, wasn't there some sort of water pump seal upgrade using a yamaha seal that should be done as long as the stator is being replaced? I have searched the web and can't find mention of it.

Am I imagining the post I read at one time regrarding the water pump seal issue?
 

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My CX650TC has a bad stator.

Honda shows the stator as not available.



I did a board search can't find as to who makes the best replacement for a bad stator. I have found a manufacturer called "Electrosport" that sells stators.



Also, wasn't there some sort of water pump seal upgrade using a yamaha seal that should be done as long as the stator is being replaced? I have searched the web and can't find mention of it.

Am I imagining the post I read at one time regrarding the water pump seal issue?
this appies to the cx and gl range.is this the post you remember

http://globalcxglvtwins.hostingdelivered.com/viewtopic.php?f=7&t=355

or is the turbo different?
 

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Electrosport. Don't bother, too many issues, too many failures, too many modifications to be worth it. (Grinding aluminum off of the inside of the engine casing doesn't appeal to me). 100% crap.



You want a great stator, send your bad one in to Custom Rewind. I have purchased three stators from them now (GL500, and 2 Eurosports, mine and my wife's).

Excellent build quality, they use a new, ultra resilient high temp green resin that may actually allow the stators to last longer, so long as you keep an eye on the plugs and don't let them melt together (better yet, solder the yellow wires and avoid the plug altogether).



The Yamaha water pump mechanical seal is not an upgrade, it's the same mechanical seal for about half the price of the Honda unit.

Shit ton of them on e-bay.



While you are in there, replace the cam chain, and also the starter clutch torx bolts.



It really shouldn't be called the triple bypass anymore. . .
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Uh, triple bypass?



As a newbie would that be replacing the stator and water pump seal and inspecting the engine speed sensor and replacing if necessary?



Is this correct?



I see there is a automotive based engine speed sensor replacement, has this proven to be reliable?
 

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Stator, seal and camchain/tensioner is the triple bypass. If this is the first stator change out the mileage probably isn't high. If the bike has less than 20K miles I wouldn't worry about the cam chain.



Car sensor mod has been reported to work 100% perfect however you must get the wiring in the correct orientation. If you mix two up the bike will only run for several seconds die out...ECU needs the correct feedback so it knows the engine has actually started. Since the wire colors are different you may have to experiment around.



I've had no issues with my electrosport stator, it was a simple drop in replacement but a few others have had issues. When it's time to do my 650 I'll probably go elsewhere. Not sure why your Honda dealer said it's no longer available as I believe it's still being used today in some models including ATVs. Other manufacturers such as Yamaha also use that stator.



Honda CXT mech seals were $25 from my Honda dealer last time I bought them.

They were NOT the same number as the standard CX seals and cost half as much. Since the Yamaha seals have been used by plenty of people in the CX and CXT they are apparently all the same.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
18k miles on the 650TC.



I will get the stator replaced, Honda part number 31120-MC7-005 is listed as no longer available so I will get my burned out stator rewound by Custom Rewind. This is the first stator replacement.



Does anybody know what other model stator will fit besides the cx500/650?



As long as I have the stator out I will change the seal and inspect the engine speed sensor.
 

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I am going to completely disagree with those who say not to replace the cam chain.



Here's why:

1) You already have the engine open.

2) Your cam chain may not be at the stretch point, but it is still 28 years old.

3) For $90.00, you have an insurance policy that you won't have to crack open your engine for a broken cam chain.

4) You REALLY want to inspect and/or replace the TORX bolts on the starter clutch.

Three out of the five CX/GL650 bikes I own or have owned had starter clutch issues.

The only way to be 100% sure is to remove the rotor, which means that you are only a few bolts away from the cam chain anyway.
 

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Metal fatigues over time, and it is still a chain with hundreds of little, aging links.



Personally, I don't think it's worth putting hours of work into yanking an engine to replace the stator, and not spend the extra time and relatively few $ to make sure that I don't have to do it again.



Like I said, it's cheap insurance.
 

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It's not insurance though at all. Replacing a chain that's perfectly fine with a new chain is a complete waste of $90, which to most of us isn't a small amount of money. There is no insurance. If a chain is fine the only way it's going to break is a freak/accident scenario, like a guide busting or something causing it to snap. That can just as well happen to a new chain. Stop giving the OP repeated poor advice on this



Also it's not hours and hours of work to pull the engine/rear cover, that can be done realatively easily especially after you've done it once.
 

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Metal fatigues over time, and it is still a chain with hundreds of little, aging links.



Personally, I don't think it's worth putting hours of work into yanking an engine to replace the stator, and not spend the extra time and relatively few $ to make sure that I don't have to do it again.



Like I said, it's cheap insurance.




Tim makes a very valid point here. I do not consider his recommendation "bad advice". It is his is well experienced preference of replacing something in advance that may be prone to failure, depending on the mileage. Cam chains due stretch and wear. So do the sprockets (any sharp points on sprocket teeth are good indicators). He knows these bikes quite well and would not lead anyone astray. I understand the points and counter-points you are both making in this regard.
 

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Thank you Rodney.

My advice is based on personal preference, and should be taken as such.

If you really want the last word on the subject, log onto e-bay, look for the store nikdanjon, and contact them.

Greg Goss and Tim Deinhart specialize in restoring and rebuilding CX650T's. If they say do it, listen to them. If they say don't worry about it, then don't worry about it.



My final thought on this subject. . .



The turbocharged bikes put considerably more torque through the powertrain than any of the aspirated engines, and further, the turbos weigh more than even a fully loaded GL650I.

The cam chain used on the CXT's is the same one used on all of the aspirated CX/GL engines.

OP's bike is a 650T, double the horsepower of a carbureted 500, and a good 130 lbs heavier.



Cheers.
 

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I agree with Tim, if you are in there, especially on the turbo (in respect of the 500TC), you don't want to pull the motor again to replace a worn camchain, there is enough tubes and wires to reconnect from a motor out and strip down, then do it while it's there - very cheap insurance and peace of mind imho. I'm not sure if the 650T has the same amount of plumbing attached as the 500 but I would expect so.
 

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Electrosport. Don't bother, too many issues, too many failures, too many modifications to be worth it. (Grinding aluminum off of the inside of the engine casing doesn't appeal to me). 100% crap.


What about the G7 / G8 stators from across the pond? (I'm interested in the higher 250W output since I have the ignitech).
 

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I'm under triple bypass with the Stator, Timing Chain and Mechanical Seal being replaced. The Stator failed and that's what lead to dropping the motor. I dealt with RMStator.com who are located in Quebec Canada.

They were very quick to replace the stator...they did not rewind. Below you will see the new and old. They took my existing engine gromets (part of the procedure is to send them your old stator, so I sent it in with the wires and gromets attached. They removed and attached to the new wiring, and it fits beautifully. My stator is now attached to the rear cover and I'm getting the mechanical seal tomorrow.



Apparently the wiring method on the new one is called "Delta" wiring (as opposed to "Y" wiring on the old) which certainly is less bulky and neater looking. Some minor voltage differences occur with Delta wiring at slow speeds, however the members on this forum have told me it's nothing to worry about.



FYI



 

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My 500T has a clear resin RM stator on it. So far, no complaints, and I have 7k miles on the bike since the triple bypass.

The rest of my rebuilds have green resin Custom Rewind stators.



Several years ago, Custom Rewind started testing the new resin on a Triumph stator that was prone to failure as regularly as ours (approx 20k), and as of my last conversation with the owner, not one single green resin Triumph stator has been returned.

He started using the resin on the CX stators shortly after that.
 

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It's not insurance though at all. Replacing a chain that's perfectly fine with a new chain is a complete waste of $90, which to most of us isn't a small amount of money. There is no insurance. If a chain is fine the only way it's going to break is a freak/accident scenario, like a guide busting or something causing it to snap. That can just as well happen to a new chain. Stop giving the OP repeated poor advice on this



Also it's not hours and hours of work to pull the engine/rear cover, that can be done realatively easily especially after you've done it once.


I'm sorry morrow, but which turbo model do you have again?
 

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I have to go along with the group here. If you have pulled the motor out and have it apart, go ahead and replace the camchain. Unless you have unlimited time to just do things one at a time, this is a worthwhile replacement. I can't tell you how many racecar parts we replaced due to the amount of time on an engine rather than part failure. There were always people who wanted to buy used valve train parts, rods etc. for cheaper motors, but we did not want to risk failure. Airplane people do that too, go figure. With a 28 year old engine that is already experiencing some failures, the camchain is pretty cheap in the scheme of things. Stripping down a turbo bike is a lot more involved than a normal CX. There might be a couple dozen guys in the world who do this real well on turbo bikes and then there are the rest of us. Take your time, use quality parts, follow the guy's suggestions on this forum and then spend the rest of the time riding.

Ed
 
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