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I recently had some difficulties removing some screws on my carbs, and it seemed the more I torqued with my phillips screwdriver, the more I was damaging the screw heads. Frustrating. I also noticed each screw had a small circular indent on the head. What's that all about? In a search for another item on the forum, I ran across a comment about a JIS screw. A little research later, I realized the CX is built with many of these screws, including the carbs and stays, and they are not quite the same as phillips, although they look very similar. While a phillips screwdriver may work on some JIS screws, it will likely damage a tightly held screw before you can get it out--exactly what was happening on my carbs!. The reason is that the phillips blade tip does not conform exactly to the JIS head. Perhaps this is old news for many forum members, but for me it was revelation. Below is a more detailed explanation from Wikipedia on several cruciform-type (cross shape) screw types, including the JIS:

Phillips
Created by Henry F. Phillips, the Phillips screw drive was purposely designed to cam out when the screw stalled,[citation needed] to prevent the fastener damaging the work or the head, instead damaging the driver. This was caused by the relative difficulty in building torque limiting into the early drivers. The American Screw Company of Providence, Rhode Island was responsible for devising a means of manufacturing the screw, and successfully patented and licensed their method; other screw makers of the 1930s dismissed the Phillips concept because it calls for a relatively complex recessed socket shape in the head of the screw — as distinct from the simple milled slot of a slotted type screw.

Frearson
The Frearson screw drive, also known as the Reed and Prince screw drive, is similar to a Phillips but the Frearson has a sharp tip and larger angle in the V shape.[7] One advantage over the Phillips drive is that one driver or bit fits all screw sizes. It is often found in marine hardware and requires a Frearson screwdriver or bit to work properly. The tool recess is a perfect, sharp cross, allowing for higher applied torque, unlike the rounded, tapered Phillips head, which was designed to cam out at high torque. It was developed by an English inventor named Frearson in the 19th century and produced from the late 1930s to the mid-1970s. The Reed & Prince Mfg. Company of Worcester, Massachusetts, was put into bankruptcy in 1987 and liquidated in 1990. Another entity called Reed & Prince Manufacturing Corporation, now of Leominster, Massachusetts, purchased some of the assets including the name at the liquidation sale.

Japanese Industrial Standard JIS B 1012
The JIS B 1012 is commonly found in Japanese equipment. It looks like a Phillips screw, but is designed not to cam out and will, therefore, be damaged by a Phillips screwdriver if it is too tight. The JIS screws are squared off right angles as compared to the phillips which are rounded at each apex to allow the screwdriver to cam out when maximum torque is reached. Heads are usually identifiable by a single dot or an "X" to one side of the cross slot. Specific "JIS" standardized cruciform-blade screwdrivers are available for this type of screw.

Mortorq
The Mortorq drive, developed by the Phillips Screw Company, is a format used in automotive and aerospace applications. It is designed to be a lightweight, low-profile and high-strength drive, with full contact over the entire recess wing reducing risk of stripping.

Pozidriv
The Pozidriv, sometimes purposely misspelled Pozidrive to avoid trademark infringement, screw drive is an improved version of the Phillips screw drive. They can be unscrewed with a regular Phillips screwdriver. It is jointly patented by the Phillips Screw Company and American Screw Company. The name is thought to be a portmanteau of positive drive. Its advantage over Phillips drives is its decreased likelihood to cam out, which allows greater torque to be applied. In ANSI standards it is referred to as type IA. It is very similar to, and essentially compatible with, the Supadriv screw drive.
Phillips drivers have an intentional angle on the flanks and rounded corners so they will cam out of the slot before a power tool will twist off the screw head. The Pozidriv screws and drivers have straight sided flanks.
The Pozidriv screwdriver and screws are also visually distinguishable from Phillips by the second set of radial indentations set 45 degrees from the cross recess. The manufacturing process for Pozidriv screwdrivers is slightly more complex. The Phillips driver has four simple slots cut out of it, whereas in the Pozidriv each slot is the result of two machining processes at right angles. The result of this is that the arms of the cross are parallel-sided with the Pozidriv, and tapered with the Phillips.
This design is intended to decrease the likelihood that the Pozidriv screwdriver will slip out, provide a greater driving surface, and decrease wear. The chief disadvantage of Pozidriv screws is that they are visually quite similar to Phillips, thus many people are unaware of the difference or do not own the correct drivers for them, and use incorrect screwdrivers. This results in difficulty with removing the screw and damage to the recess, rendering any subsequent use of a correct screwdriver unsatisfactory. Phillips screwdrivers will fit in and turn Pozidriv screws, but will cam out if enough torque is applied, potentially damaging the screw head. The drive wings on a Pozidriv screwdriver will not fit a Phillips screw correctly, and are likely to slip or tear out the screw head.

Supadriv
The Supadriv (sometimes found incorrectly as "Supadrive") screw drive is very similar in function and appearance to Pozidriv—indeed, the two are often thought to be identical—and is a later development by the same company. The description of the Pozidriv head applies also to Supadriv. While each has its own driver, the same screwdriver heads may be used for both types without damage; for most purposes it is unnecessary to distinguish between the two drives. Pozidriv and Supadriv screws are slightly different in detail; the later Supadriv allows a small angular offset between the screw and the screwdriver, while Pozidriv has to be directly in line.
In detail, the Supadriv screwhead is similar to Pozidriv but has only two identification ticks, and the secondary blades are larger. Drive blades are about equal thickness. The main practical difference is in driving screws into vertical surfaces: that close to a near vertical surface to drive the screws into the drivers, Supadriv has superior bite, making screwdriving more efficient, with less cam out.

I am now the owner of a #2 Hozan JIS screwdriver. It comes with an broad, padded handle and magnetic tip. Cost was $15, so there won't be many of these in my tool box, but for rebuilding the CX I believe it's worth the expense.

Bob
 

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One trick some people do is to grind down the point on a phillips screwdriver and make it into a JIS wannabe. I've seen JIS screwdrivers at different tool places randomly... Ace Hardware, Sears, etc.

I normally just make a run down to Ace and replace most of my JIS screws with stainless allen bolts. I usually just run into them on carb bowls.
 

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I have been able to remove most stubborn JIS with the proper sized phillips bit, some heat or penetrant and an impact driver without much of a problem. Best bet is to order yourself a set of JIS drivers though.
 

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I use Vessel in JIS and Snap On in straight or Phillips, great feel and control. A couple of the JIS in the Vessel sets are impacts which adds to their usefulness. Yes, JIS work on Phillips, but the other way around is questionable as a million rounded Honda screw heads have proven.
 

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There are some pretty cool brands out of Japan that make excellent quality and unique or very handy and far more functional or durable than many tools being sold by Stanley or many other brands and their quality exceeds many of Snap On's USA made tools. Engineer brand is one that comes to mind, others that are not necessarily Japanese but great is also Wilha, The heat treat on the tips of tools made well will be of a good high strength tool steel and they may even add Vandium into the steel to make it very long wearing. Crapsman, oops...misspelled that, should be Craftsman, has poor quality steel now and edges wear on screwdrivers making the easy to slip screw head design of the philips be even worse. Starrett may still make great measuring instruments unless they have sent things to China or been bought out. The bean counter executives tend to sell out the brands and convince the board that things are in the best interest of the company. That is what happened to many American businesses. Or sales slumped, causing them to look to lower costs and follow the herd of other companies that did the same. If an enemy of the US wanted to destroy America, that could have been a great way to do it...or has been a great way to have done it...

Vessel are great screwdrivers, they have many handy designs.

I saw a small American made screwdriver design that was ratcheting and revolutionary in many ways...it has struggled to gain a foothold and probably will fail. I don't recall the name. They are in my wish list on Amazon, they make a ratcheting bit driver and screwdrivers and they will hold up to more than you can torque a fastener by hand or if you do not put too large a wrench on it.

A great idea of a small plastic 1/4 inch socket screwdriver was to embed a socket in the back you could attach an extension or even the socket wrench. No clue on the company that made it as the yellow clear plastic handle no longer has any identifying marks.

The Vessel JiS, actually they only make JIS std screwdrivers...no others like Philips, Ball series have a 420 series but the 430 ball handled screwdrivers are tang through from tip to the end of the ball handle. Allowing you to give the screw a smack with a hammer to either shock it to loosen it after breaking any stuck threads if a smack like that is all that is needed. Not an impact wrench design like the Impacta series. This would also work to start a wood screw if an awl isn't handy and the screw is too short to hold with your fingers.

Sorry to write a book...
 

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You could also go the inexpensive route and get JIS bits.

I got a set on FleaBay with 2 bits of 3 different sized JIS bits for under $10.

If you get one of the cheapie "whatchamacallit" bit sets from places like Harbor Freight, they'll usually have a few bits which look like they'll fit JIS screw heads.
 
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The bits will work, you are Not going to find JIS in Harbor Fright's bits, look at some of the security bits sometime...The holes for the post are off center in a set I have. Yes, I buy stuff at H.F. but it is a gamble on quality...getting better for the tools as they are a decent quality for being made in China.

Motion Pro came out with a JIS T-wrench and they sell replacement 2 packs of the JIS bits in the +1, +2, and +3 sizes. The CX and GL have the hex head stuff mostly on the motor, that beats the CB series which uses JIS screws and the Philips screws (Typically marked PH1, PH2, PH3) are cammed out because they don't fit. The PH3 in an impact driver will work often, but hand screwdrivers that are US typically sold cross point screwdrivers will mess up the JIS screwheads if you are not very careful, as has been previously said in this thread.
The JIS replacement bits by Motion Pro are $3.50 or below last I looked if I recall correctly for the 2 pack. A good deal but they are probably not going to be the nice hardened tip great tool steel used in the Vessel.
 

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What are good JIS sizes to start with?

Naked GL500
Minneapolis, Minnesota
Sent from my XT1575 using Tapatalk
 

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Are the M5 screws on the handlebars a +2 or a +1?

The CX and GL have more bolts than screws...earlier bikes used screws on cases and they would take a #+3, + for cross point.

Vessel are very good quality, Amazon also carries Hozan JIS screwdrivers. Vessel has a Impacts which is a special screwdriver with impact unscrew action built in when held firmly and struck with a big hammer. Megadoras are more common...
They also have a ball screwdriver line which is the 220 and 230 series. 230 have the shaft through the ball handle and can be struck with a hammer without damage as can the impacts line. The ball handled drivers have a rubberized handle while the megadora are a blue plastic that is close to turquoise in color and the handle size is generous for good grip. The 220W has replaceable long bits for +1, +2, +3, -6 (slotted screwdriver #6 size) and Pz2 & Pz3
Pz is pozidriver.

The bits it the 220W are doubled ended buy fit in std 1/4" hex screwdriver bit holders.
Most hand impact drivers use a bigger 5/16" hex bit.
Vessel also sells a nice hand impact driver...

I recently bought the 220W and have the Megadora +1, +2, +3, -6, and Impacta +3 along with the stubby +2 and Vessel Impact driver as well. It is the chromed steel one in the blue metal box that is discontinued.
 

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On my bike I don't think I have come across any #1 JIS screws other than perhaps inside the handlebar controls, almost all are #2's. The brackets holding the carbs together have both #2 and #3 JIS.
 

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On my bike I don't think I have come across any #1 JIS screws other than perhaps inside the handlebar controls, almost all are #2's. The brackets holding the carbs together have both #2 and #3 JIS.
Thanks! I will order #2s and #3s.
 

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The CX and GL have more bolts than screws...
Actually, they are almost all screws. The difference between screws and bolts has absolutely nothing to do with the shape of the head. A bolt is something that is screwed into a nut and a screw is something that is screwed into any part that is not a nut. This means that those M6 with 8mm hex head parts in the bin can be either bolts or screws until they are actually screwed into something, sort of like Schrodinger's fasteners....
 

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I put together a set of Vessel JIS drivers this past summer. Mostly from Amazon, but a couple pieces from eBay, if I remember right. In the basic, turquoise handled line I got a #1, a #2 in two lengths, and a #3. I also got #s 2 & 3 in the Impacta line. I don't know that I've used them all yet, but the ones I have used, I was very happy to have.


R
 

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I have the #2 impacta. Works great as a screwdriver and the impact driver feature works wonders on the stubborn ones.
 
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