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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone

Is the 650I electric strong enough to carry 2 heated jackets and gloves, My Yamaha Venture can't. When I get the 650 restored, I really want it to be my number one bike. As I get older that 860 lbs gets harder to hold up. To me the 650 would be ideal for touring and around town. Also, does anyone know if the 650 can pull a tailor, and does anyone one make a hitch for the Sliverwings.

Thanks for any help.
 

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I don't know for sure. Much depends on the total wattage of the gear you plan to hook up.



Most likely it will be able to handle it, though. I ran some tests on a GL500 a few years ago using some high wattage resistor load banks when I was considering heated gear. As I recall, there was plenty of reserve capacity for anything I intended to throw at it. The GL650 uses the same stator.



Do you have the gear already? If so, try hooking it up temporarily and measuring the battery voltage while running the bike at various rpm's. Don't be concerned if the voltage droops some below 2000 rpm.



I've seen several trailer hitch setups for the GL's. Maybe someone can jump in with more specific information.
 

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If it is charging properly the GL500/650 stator puts out 252 watts, with some of course used up to power the bike's ignition and lights.



You can also buy an aftermarket stator and get up to 300 watts. Or, you could install a GL1000/1100 stator and get 350 watts, if you did that you would probably also want to install the GL1000/1100 regulator/rectifier.



As part of your restoration make sure you r&r the 3-wire plug that connects the stator to the regulator/rectifier as it likes to corrode, heat up, and burn up. A lot of guys just cut that troublesome plug out and hard wire the stator in.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
If it is charging properly the GL500/650 stator puts out 252 watts, with some of course used up to power the bike's ignition and lights.



You can also buy an aftermarket stator and get up to 300 watts. Or, you could install a GL1000/1100 stator and get 350 watts, if you did that you would probably also want to install the GL1000/1100 regulator/rectifier.



As part of your restoration make sure you r&r the 3-wire plug that connects the stator to the regulator/rectifier as it likes to corrode, heat up, and burn up. A lot of guys just cut that troublesome plug out and hard wire the stator in.


wow, Thanks for taking the time and the great advice........I would love to see some pictures of hitches if anyone has any?
 

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wow, Thanks for taking the time and the great advice........I would love to see some pictures of hitches if anyone has any?


This Thread



among others has some ideas for trailer hitches.



I run heated jacket, heated pants, heated gloves and heated boot insoles during cold weather. It all totals 180 watts and I have no trouble with a stock stator on my GL650I.
 

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I've got heated grips on my CX500 and it works no problem.



I have standard stator, and I'm running a Ignitech.



But I did instal a better battery on the bike. A 'Motobatt', I can highly recommend them.



Cheers



Curt.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Hi

The jacket liner is a Gerbing 77 watts Gerbing gloves 27 watts, my wife has the same. that's almost 200 watts riding two up,

thanks for the info.
 

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Hi

The jacket liner is a Gerbing 77 watts Gerbing gloves 27 watts, my wife has the same. that's almost 200 watts riding two up,

thanks for the info.


I recommend using modulators (PWM's) to control your gear, that way you will use less power unless set to full on. 200 watts is about the max for gear on the 650. I also recommend installing a volt meter to monitor your system. If the voltage starts to decrease just turn your gear down a bit. That 77 watts should be good down to 20 below or so. My 60 watts keeps me plenty toasty at 10 F



An inexpensive PWM
 

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Or, you could install a GL1000/1100 stator and get 350 watts, if you did that you would probably also want to install the GL1000/1100 regulator/rectifier.
That's odd, my book says the GL1000 & 1100 alternators are rated at 300W. I have been running a GL1100 stator in my CX650 for a couple of years with the original reg/rec with no problems and had a GL1000 stator in my GL500 for a few years with its original reg/rec before that.



Is the 650I electric strong enough to carry 2 heated jackets and gloves
The short answer is no.



Your headlight needs 55W (60 on high beam). The ignition needs maybe 50-100W (depending on engine RPM) and you have somewhere over 30W of instrument lights, tail lights, marker lights &c. Then you turn on the turn signals and they draw another 46W or so. Add another 46W or so for the brake lights.



Your alternator is rated at 252W. It can't produce that unless the engine is turning over at something like 2500 or 3000 RPM. At idle it produces more like 100W - with just the original electrical equipment that's not enough to power everything so the rest of the power has to come from the battery. If you are just sitting at a traffic light with your brakes on and your turn signals flashing for a couple of minutes you will probably notice the headlight dimming every time the signals flash, but that's OK because as soon as you pull away the output will go back up and your battery will recharge.



Add another 200W and you will be pulling at least 80W from the battery at highway speed (more around town or when idling). You will either run your battery down, fry your stator or both by doing that.



I always wonder why people feel the need for electrically heated clothing on bikes (especially people who live in places that never get really cold and have bikes with big fairings). I drive my CX650 based sidecar outfit to & from work every day all winter in Southern Ontario. I have Poly Heaters in my handlebars but that's it. I have a decent snowmobile suit for winter and it is plenty warm over a t-shirt & jeans. When it is cold out (we usually see -30c/15f at least a few times every winter) I wear a sweater vest under it. If it is warmer than 10c(40f) my lined leather jacket is plenty warm enough.



My advice would be to sell the heated gear, install Poly Heaters (36W on high) and buy a couple of sweaters and some warm gloves (or even mitts if you will be somewhere that is actually cold) that you can keep in your saddlebags. You could also just wear your rainsuit jackets over your regular riding gear if you get chilly.
 

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Add another 200W and you will be pulling at least 80W from the battery at highway speed (more around town or when idling). You will either run your battery down, fry your stator or both by doing that.




How would this damage the stator? This is a permanent magnet stator and rotor assembly. It is producing full wattage full time. External loads won't cause it to wear out any faster?
 

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Easiest fix - move to Florida.
Very infrequently gets much below 35F here. I'm good for riding in just my leather jacket and gloves all winter.



(Yeah that is a little bit of gloating that you smell there)




Ride on,



Fib
 

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Easiest fix - move to Florida.
Very infrequently gets much below 35F here. I'm good for riding in just my leather jacket and gloves all winter.



(Yeah that is a little bit of gloating that you smell there)




Ride on,



Fib
The air-conditioned jackets for the florida summers are even more expensive
 

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100 watts?

Sounds like a lot to me.

You sure?
I can't remember where I got that number from, but 4A each for the transistorized ignition units + the coils that they supply power to doesn't sound excessive to me.



How would this damage the stator? This is a permanent magnet stator and rotor assembly. It is producing full wattage full time. External loads won't cause it to wear out any faster?
Not quite.



Most bikes (including HTTs) have alternators consisting of a rotor (usually permanent magnets in the engine's flywheel) and fixed generating coils (stator).



If you try to draw too much current out of the stator the wires in its coils will become very hot. Usually the insulation burns off before the wires actually melt.



Easiest fix - move to Florida.
He's already in North Carolina. Do they even have winter there? I'm sure what they call winter is more like what we would call a warm fall day
 

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Not quite.



Most bikes (including HTTs) have alternators consisting of a rotor (usually permanent magnets in the engine's flywheel) and fixed generating coils (stator).



If you try to draw too much current out of the stator the wires in its coils will become very hot. Usually the insulation burns off before the wires actually melt.




That makes sense, if you try to draw it down past the regulated voltage. I whould have thought of that before I wrote the above reply!



Above that voltage, I thought the load would be fairly constant, due to the regulator shunting current to ground to drop the voltage. Is this correct?



My impression was that there were two quick way s to kill stators: overheating it, or running it with no load so that the voltage exceeded the breakdown voltage of the weak spots in the insulation.
 

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That's about it. In a well designed system the current required to draw the alternator's output down to the desired regulated voltage will be significantly less than the maximum that the wires in the stator can handle before the smoke gets out.



I regularly run at less than the regulated voltage on my winter bike when it is cold enough to need the handlebar heaters on high and dark enough to need the headlight on the sidecar. I have installed a voltmeter and I keep an eye on it and give the battery an overnight charge if it starts to look like it is getting low. It probably takes longer to run my bike's battery down than yours, though, because I run a 330 CCA lawn tractor battery so it will start at -30c
 

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The air-conditioned jackets for the florida summers are even more expensive


Ok, you got me there. It does get HOT down here and for the life of me, I can't get the AC on my bike to work...




Fib
 

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for the life of me, I can't get the AC on my bike to work...
I've got the same problem. And to make it worse, my driver's side window won't open too!!!
 

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Well having dropped mine about a year and a half ago, I can guarantee that the windshield will snap right off if it hits the ground at 40mph. Of course, it was homemade from 1/8" plexi.



Ok, sorry. Didn't mean to jack this thread. Keep talkin' business.



Fib
 

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Since I fall down occasionally the snowmobile suit really doesn't work for me-no armor. Plus I don't own a snowmobile suit, but do own a one piece armored riding suit. My armored suit is warm over a t shirt and slacks down to 40 F or so without the heat, lower than that I like to turn on the home made heat, especially when on the road for many hours at a stretch. For example leaving the party at 1 AM and arriving home at 5 AM, with the temps hovering around freezing, and cruising at 85mph, the heated gear is really appreciated. I run about 150 watts of heated gear with everything on full blast, and have not run my battery down at all. Usually I will run the heated gear at 25% to 50% power, unless it is really bitter cold. BTW Bob, I know you don't like heated gear, but I love it. Room in the motorcycling world for all us different blokes right?
 
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