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I looked at the date codes on my tires last night and they appear to have been made in 2005. I've put almost 3k miles on them so far. yay me!

So... after reading many forum posts, it seems like I should look into new tires ASAP. What I think I would do is order the new tires online, remove the wheels, then bring wheels & tires somewhere to be mounted. (FWIW I am also interested in the Dyna Beads for balancing, not sure if dealers would properly install them).

But I am not looking forward to this because:

- Everything involving load-bearing fasteners on this bike has been insanely tight and difficult to remove. Even the oil filter bolt was stupidly overtightened.
- I've never removed a front or rear wheel, yes I have the service manual, it's STILL intimidating to consider it.
- I have no motorcycle lift or anything that will assist in the process.
- I have no compressor to reinflate them should I need to do so.

So I have little confidence in me successfully doing this by myself. Is there a shop that will change them for me at a reasonable price? Or else is there anyone local that can help me with the removal, and potentially the mounting / reinflation part as well?

Thanks!
Willie
 

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Most shops will only mount tires that you buy from them.

Changing tires is a bit of work but it isn't all that complicated. I won't list all the steps because there are any number of tutorials on the subject online. Changing tires (or removing the wheels for other service) does not require a lift. When you put the bike in the centrestand the rear wheel will be off the ground so removing it according to the FSM should be straightforward. When removing the front wheel don't worry about it being on the ground; Follow the instructions in the manual and as soon as you remove the caps in the ends of the forks that retain the axle and the front wheel's weight is no longer attached to the forks the bike will tip back onto the rear wheel.

A compressor is a very useful thing to have and not just for filling tires. I highly recommend getting one if you have the space for it.
 

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Hey, Willie. If we can find the right day, I'd be happy to help.


R
 

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Might be worth it to invest in even a small compressor. To set the bead on a new tire, Ive never needed more than 60 psi or so. A hand pump wont do because you need high volume, not just pressure.
My favorite trick for setting the bead is to use a 16" or 19" bicycle inner tube, partially inflated, between the bead area of the rim and the new tire. This helps lock the bead in on the opposite side. Then remove the tube and the other side should pop in once you run the compressed air again.
Use liquid soap to lube everything, it helps.
As for balancing beads, I swear by them...they really work, with no damage to the tire even after nearly 20,000 miles.
Breaking the bead on the old tire can be a bitch, but look up "motion pro bead breaker" and/or "break bead with kickstand" for helpful info...
 

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For taking the tires off as well as putting them on you can lubricate the tire beads with soapy water if you don't have anything better but proper bead lubricant works much better if you can get it.

BUT no matter what you read on the internet or any of your buddies try to tell you never, ever use dish detergent (attacks the aluminum rims) or oil (there have been reports of tires rotating on the rims) or ArmorAll (don't even take a chance of that stuff getting onto the tread) to lubricate beads.

BTW: I meant to mention above that changing a motorcycle tire is pretty much the same as changing a bicycle tire except that it requires more effort.
 

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I do not take my bikes to the shop, except for tire changes. They are just a pain in the ass. I would recommend you find a private motorcycle shop in your area. They seem more willing to work with you on pricing. I figure what tires I want online and then I go to the shop and negioate price. Most shops will order what ever tire you want. It is ok if they make a couple of bucks. You save by bringing the wheels already off the bike. I usually mark the direction of rotation on the wheel. Yes they can remove the tire and put the new one on backwards without the bike in the shop. I once had a shop call just to make sure.
 

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I replaced my rear tire myself, not worrying about balancing. I modified a C clamp to break the beads loose, without marring the rims. It was quite a bit of work though!

The front tire I let a tire shop replace, as I wanted it balanced. I paid a bit more for their tire but, that's okay. In the end, the wheel turned out to be perfectly balanced . . . no weight required. Had I known . . . LOL
 

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The front tire I let a tire shop replace, as I wanted it balanced. I paid a bit more for their tire but, that's okay. In the end, the wheel turned out to be perfectly balanced . . . no weight required. Had I known . . . LOL
That's because they pre-balanced the empty rim, and aligned the tire too that. I did the same, and needed no supplemental weights.


R
 

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I bought a Harbor Fright tire changer plus a motorcycle adapter for about $75
That might be worth investing in. I'll have to watch the sales.


R
 

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For taking the tires off as well as putting them on you can lubricate the tire beads with soapy water if you don't have anything better but proper bead lubricant works much better if you can get it.

BUT no matter what you read on the internet or any of your buddies try to tell you never, ever use dish detergent (attacks the aluminum rims) or oil (there have been reports of tires rotating on the rims) or ArmorAll (don't even take a chance of that stuff getting onto the tread) to lubricate beads.

BTW: I meant to mention above that changing a motorcycle tire is pretty much the same as changing a bicycle tire except that it requires more effort.
Didn't know that about dish detergent... what is it in dish soap that harms aluminum? I bought some "real" tire lube once, and as I recall, it had the same chemical ingredients listed as the dish soap.
 

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Sodium Hydroxide. The problem is that dish detergent has a lot higher concentration, which doesn't matter for its intended use where it is rinsed off after use. Easy Method To Ruin Your Wheels | Randakk's Blog

I used to find corrosion on the mating surfaces of the rims when I used detergent to lubricate beads. Since I started using bead lube I do not, even on the machine that is used on salted roads all winter. And not only is mounting it easier & faster to mount a tire with bead lube than with soap but it is easier to remove again when the time comes. When you include not having to clean corrosion off of the rim it adds up to a significantly less onerous task.

BTW: I have been using a product called Tire Slick, which I get from Princess Auto.
 

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I use Windex straight out of the bottle (the dollar store kind) to lubricate my tires when mounting. I like it, evaporates kind of fast, but I think of that as a good thing. Any know flaws with doing this? I've done it with about 8 MC tires so far.

I have the Harbor Freight tire changer and the MC balancer. Near $70 for both. Haven't picked up the MC tire changer adapter piece yet though. The reviews seem iffy on it. Don't take me buy 15-20min per tire once it's off the bike. So that's good with me. I always line up the dot on the tire with the valve stem on rim and about half my wheels come out balanced with no weight. Others just need 1 1/4oz weight. Which harbor also sells. I don't both with power tools from harbor but hand tools seem to be fairly good.
 

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It's true. I've just never thought of buying proper bead lubricant when I'm out and about. And I think about it after I'm in the middle of the tire job and I don't want to stop to run to the store. I quit using soap and water long ago because read about how it has the potential to eat aluminum. I'm not sure where I came up with the Windex idea, maybe I read it somewhere or maybe I was glancing around for a spray bottle to use and gave it a shot. I figured with the quick evaporation and being isopropyl? alcohol that it would be fine, no left over residue, and gives my tires a streak free shine when installed.
 

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I do like the jack stand idea for holding up the wheel to balance it. I have a couple of pieces of aluminum angle that I cut a v in and use those on saw horses.
 

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I changed my own tires using large c clamps and pry bars with some cardboard between to protect the rims ( I personally found it very similar to changing a bicycle tire, but then again I have changed truck and tractor tires "in the field" literally). For lube I used baby powder (talcum, not cornstarch) which worked fine. I also swear by the balancing beads; after changing the tires I ran a few miles with no balancing, and it was pretty rough, esp when approaching highway speed. Then I installed the beads through the valve and wow what a huge difference.
 

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I changed my own tires using large c clamps and pry bars with some cardboard between to protect the rims ( I personally found it very similar to changing a bicycle tire, but then again I have changed truck and tractor tires "in the field" literally). For lube I used baby powder (talcum, not cornstarch) which worked fine. I also swear by the balancing beads; after changing the tires I ran a few miles with no balancing, and it was pretty rough, esp when approaching highway speed. Then I installed the beads through the valve and wow what a huge difference.
When I change out tires, I use a couple of automotive disc brake pads to spread the clamp face over the tire side. I hope that makes sense! I never thought of the talcum powder idea, I've always used carb cleaner or brake cleaner. (Probably not one of my better ideas). I have only recently heard about those beads. I think I'll try them next tire change. Are they any good in the rear tire?
 

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Hello anyone! New to the forum. Trying to mount front tire on CX500. Using basic tools (tire irons, rim protectors, garage floor), I'm up to trying to get the bead to seat. I have 270 degrees seated. Facing brake disk with valve at 12 o'clock, length between two spokes at 3 o'clock position won't seat (using Windex and up to 45 psig with air compressor). I just changed two tube tires without this much trouble. Is it usually this difficult? Any suggestions? Thanks
 
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