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Thank You for the article.



That is the method I've used for bleeding brakes for years, it isn't working on this bike, and the m/c leaked past the cover gasket today, so I'm buying a new master cylinder.



The info on fluids was very useful. I think I will switch to the dot 5 stuff.



The support and information on this forum was one of the reasons I bought my bike.



Thank You to all the folks who share your wisdom and experience



Hobbit
 

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There are times and brakes that will bleed with a reverse bleed, when nothing else works. I use an oiler can (the ones with the pump handle at most FLAPS for under $5), with a piece of tubing over the nipple and the brake bleeder, then force brake fluid back through the system. It's saved my bacon a few times with stubborn masters and clutches.
 

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The info on fluids was very useful. I think I will switch to the dot 5 stuff.


If you switch to DOT5, be sure to clean/replace every piece of your hydraulic system. If you mix DOT5 with DOT3, DOT4, or DOT5.1 it will cause seals to swell and crack rapidly.



The best time to switch to DOT5 is when you're going to replace the caliper seal(s) and the master cylinder (or rebuild the master cylinder). In the meantime flush the old lines with water AND alcohol or replace those too. After that's done you will have a system free of any trace of your old brake fluid, ready to accept DOT5



HOWEVER

DOT5 is a completely different kind of brake fluid, it's silicone based, silicone can absorb air bubbles and hold them tight, which sometimes can cause bleeding very difficult (having to pump LOTS of fluid thru) and having a long-lasting spongy-feeling master cylinder. It also flows differently than traditional polyethylene glycol based fluids so some master cylinders won't be able to push enough thru to accomidate the different fluid, and some might have issues where the return hole isn't big enough and can cause the pistons to take a while to release. Additionally, if you do get moisture into your brake system, since water can't absorb with silicone any water will go to the lowest point (the caliper) and sit there corroding it away, until you take off the caliper and clean it.



http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DOT_5



There are pros and cons for both types of fluid. Personally I stick with DOT3/4/5.1



This author seems pretty bias in his reasoning...
 

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There are times and brakes that will bleed with a reverse bleed, when nothing else works. I use an oiler can (the ones with the pump handle at most FLAPS for under $5), with a piece of tubing over the nipple and the brake bleeder, then force brake fluid back through the system. It's saved my bacon a few times with stubborn masters and clutches.


done this with a syrynge, worked awesome, especially with a dual disc system with the t junction that likes to hide air bubbles.......



Of course if you have pressure, but a "soft" lever, the old tie the handle to the bar trick also works fabulously.
 
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