Honda CX 500 Forum banner

1 - 20 of 30 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,680 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
The HTTA-MN annual ride (my first group ride) was awesome. Thanks Randall!

I found, after about 150 miles, that stretching my legs straight out alleviated hip joint pain. I got some highway bars from Paul, but they don't seem to be used with the original engine guards.

Has anyone put pegs on the hondaline guards? I am thinking the type that hang down would work. Need to figure out the right diameter. Looking for a pair that don't cost $100.00 Would this style work in photo below? I am also thinking floorboards might be better than the original pegs for touring.

(P.S. Looking in my mirror at the Kawasaki behind me that was with us, I thought it had highway pegs. But that was just the forward placement of the pegs, so the riders legs were fully extended forward.)

202605
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
14,491 Posts
I don't know if it will help you but after a bit of experimentation a long time ago I figured out that highway pegs are most comfortable (for me at least) if I located them so that I could move my foot from the driver's peg to the highway peg with my knee touching the same place on the tank.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,680 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
I located them so that I could move my foot from the driver's peg to the highway peg with my knee touching the same place on the tank.
Thanks! I will keep your advice in mind.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
14,491 Posts
I don't know if that is a general rule or only applies to me. I'm sure others will comment if they have found otherwise.

BTW: I've seen a few pics of bars mounted to the lugs on the bottom of the engine over the years but Murray always mentions that they can crack the block if the bike falls over (my sidecar subframe is bolted to those lugs but not to only those and it is a lot less likely to fall over and if I hit something hard enough to crack the engine I'll probably be looking for a new bike anyway).
I think hanging them from the crashbars is a much better idea. It is also a good idea to have ones that can fold up if the bike falls over to minimize the chance of damage to the engine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
36 Posts
Fafnir, If you do find foot pegs that work, please post here with details of where you got them any modifications if required. Where did you find the ones in the picture. Looks like they would work.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,680 Posts
Discussion Starter #7

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
14,491 Posts
Something else to consider: With highway pegs your feet are away from the brake and gearshift pedals so it takes an extra second to get your feet back to where they can operate those controls. That's OK when you are on the open road with nothing else around you but not so great in a group ride or in traffic.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,680 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Something else to consider: With highway pegs your feet are away from the brake and gearshift pedals so it takes an extra second to get your feet back to where they can operate those controls. That's OK when you are on the open road with nothing else around you but not so great in a group ride or in traffic.
Certainly. But is is much safer than sticking your legs forward in the air, like a kid riding a tricycle through a rain puddle! ;) It is hard to stop when you want in a group ride. And it is always good to keep 2 seconds distance and stagger. I try to keep 3 seconds.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
14,491 Posts
Yeah. I'm not saying not to install them or not to use them in a group ride under any circumstances, just to be careful and get your feet back to the main pegs if the group starts to slow down or someone gets closer to you for some reason.

I used to know a guy with a bike that's original pegs were pretty far forward do start with, a Shadow 1000 maybe? (It was about 25 years ago so not sure.) Anyway, he had his highway pegs set up so he could slide his right foot back an inch and work the brake with his heel.

BTW: The subject of forward controls for use with highway pegs has come up on the forum many times over the years.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,680 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Yeah. I'm not saying not to install them or not to use them in a group ride under any circumstances, just to be careful and get your feet back to the main pegs if the group starts to slow down or someone gets closer to you for some reason.
Certainly. The main point of the pegs is to increase, not decrease safety.
An interesting aspect of the ride was how similar it was to group Zen meditation. Riding requires Theta Wave relaxed attention that Ichiro Suzuki was master of at the home plate, waiting for a pitch. That's what the aim of the type of meditation I do. For example, you are not "zoned out, but are aware if someone walks into the room or moves beside you. You also experience similar leg pains sitting on a kapok zafu and dealing with those pain issues can be a matter of stealing your attention.

Relaxed attention widens you peripheral vision and keeps you aware of everything around you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
496 Posts
Lee,
I used pegs on my touring HD engine guard-found most of the time left foot was on them
but only used right side to give myself a Break (Brake) when I was away from traffic.
Your results may vary.
Paul
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,680 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Lee,
I used pegs on my touring HD engine guard-found most of the time left foot was on them
but only used right side to give myself a Break (Brake) when I was away from traffic.
Your results may vary.
Paul
Thanks Paul. I only want them for a stretch on long rides.
Hey, when we both have time, lets take that little ride to Stockholm you've mentioned.

Lee
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
794 Posts
Certainly. The main point of the pegs is to increase, not decrease safety.
An interesting aspect of the ride was how similar it was to group Zen meditation. Riding requires Theta Wave relaxed attention that Ichiro Suzuki was master of at the home plate, waiting for a pitch. That's what the aim of the type of meditation I do. For example, you are not "zoned out, but are aware if someone walks into the room or moves beside you. You also experience similar leg pains sitting on a kapok zafu and dealing with those pain issues can be a matter of stealing your attention.

Relaxed attention widens you peripheral vision and keeps you aware of everything around you.
Never heard of highway pegs being considered a safety feature. Split seconds matter in an emergency when needing to brake. Your Zen experience might make you feel more confident but it can’t see through blind corners or blind intersections nor can it predict when someone will pull in front of you. That being said, I put highway pegs on my Silverwing for comfort. My legs do get cramped on the Silverwing and the highway pegs allow me to keep going until fuel is needed to stretch my legs.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
14,491 Posts
I think the safety issue is that if your hips & legs start to ache the pain will be a dangerous distraction (I know it is for me) and it isn't always possible to pull over and stretch. Having an alternate location that you can move your feet to when conditions are safe to do so can alleviate that pain so that you can continue on safely without the distraction.

BTW: Highway pegs may help but they may not be the whole solution. I originally set Eccles up to be comfortable enough for half hour or less trips (to work & back, to a bigger town for errands, club meetings &c). It was fine for several years until I found myself needing to take a few longer trips in the winter and my hips & knees were in agony by the time I got there, even with highway pegs and lots of opportunity to use them. One day I was thinking about that and the fact that similar length trips on the GoldWing did not hurt like that while both bikes were in the garage so I did some comparative measurements of the seat/feet/hands relationship (basic motorcycle ergonomics). I found that the feet/seat relationship was pretty close but Eccles' handlegrips were a couple of inches lower and a bit farther forward relative to the seat & pegs so raising the grips sounded like a good idea, especially since the rad relocation project was going to result in the fairing being a couple of inches higher too. Taller bars might have achieved that but I couldn't find anything between what I have and ape hangers (besides, these bars already have the heaters installed in them) so I shopped for handlebar risers.
It didn't feel much different on short rides but it made a world of difference on longer trips. A few years later I realized I hadn't used the highway pegs for a long time so the next time I had the engine out I didn't re-install them when I re-installed the sidecar subframe.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
794 Posts
I think the safety issue is that if your hips & legs start to ache the pain will be a dangerous distraction (I know it is for me) and it isn't always possible to pull over and stretch. Having an alternate location that you can move your feet to when conditions are safe to do so can alleviate that pain so that you can continue on safely without the distraction.

BTW: Highway pegs may help but they may not be the whole solution. I originally set Eccles up to be comfortable enough for half hour or less trips (to work & back, to a bigger town for errands, club meetings &c). It was fine for several years until I found myself needing to take a few longer trips in the winter and my hips & knees were in agony by the time I got there, even with highway pegs and lots of opportunity to use them. One day I was thinking about that and the fact that similar length trips on the GoldWing did not hurt like that while both bikes were in the garage so I did some comparative measurements of the seat/feet/hands relationship (basic motorcycle ergonomics). I found that the feet/seat relationship was pretty close but Eccles' handlegrips were a couple of inches lower and a bit farther forward relative to the seat & pegs so raising the grips sounded like a good idea, especially since the rad relocation project was going to result in the fairing being a couple of inches higher too. Taller bars might have achieved that but I couldn't find anything between what I have and ape hangers (besides, these bars already have the heaters installed in them) so I shopped for handlebar risers.
It didn't feel much different on short rides but it made a world of difference on longer trips. A few years later I realized I hadn't used the highway pegs for a long time so the next time I had the engine out I didn't re-install them when I re-installed the sidecar subframe.
I guess I can see that point of view. I would still call it a comfort feature and not a safety feature. I am not criticizing having them or wanting to have them as I love having mine. I do find it easier to be lazy(less attentive) while using them and add to that the extra time needed to apply the brakes makes calling it a safety add on an oxymoron.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
36 Posts
Got foot pegs today and installed them but have not tested due to rain. My first thought by just sitting on the bike is that the pegs fafnir showed would work better because they would be on about the same plane as your R foot on the brake and the L on the shift lever. They are however below $100 (just under $65) and seem to be well made. Also, they are made to work with 1" bars by using plastic spacers. They are attractive to my eye and appear to be quality made. No instructions and would be a straight forward installation for a mind sharper than mine at 75. Hope to ride in the next couple of days to see how they work.
FR3.jpg
FR1.jpg
 

Attachments

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,680 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
Those look great! Can you give a link to where you got them?

Got foot pegs today and installed them but have not tested due to rain. My first thought by just sitting on the bike is that the pegs fafnir showed would work better because they would be on about the same plane as your R foot on the brake and the L on the shift lever. They are however below $100 (just under $65) and seem to be well made. Also, they are made to work with 1" bars by using plastic spacers. They are attractive to my eye and appear to be quality made. No instructions and would be a straight forward installation for a mind sharper than mine at 75. Hope to ride in the next couple of days to see how they work. View attachment 202715
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,680 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
I guess I can see that point of view. I would still call it a comfort feature and not a safety feature. I am not criticizing having them or wanting to have them as I love having mine. I do find it easier to be lazy(less attentive) while using them and add to that the extra time needed to apply the brakes makes calling it a safety add on an oxymoron.
I don't know a lot about motorcycles but I am an expert on pain and attention. If you ever sit a 90 day retreat, you become familiar.
Yes, pain is a safety issue.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
36 Posts
BTW. Found on Amazon under search for Foot Pegs for $62.97 with prime. GDAUTO Motorcycle foot pegs sold by Warm-Garden. They are very adjustable.
 
1 - 20 of 30 Posts
Top