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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been riding with my color-matched helmets since I bought my Aspencade in '86. I've been told and have read that helmets have a rather limited lifetime in regards to integrity of the materials. I'm assuming it's true and have probably reading riding on borrowed time with these 25-year-old buckets.



What's the current consensus on this? Assuming I'm going to go buy a new one (especially now that I'm also riding this beautiful '80 CX, what should I expect to pay for a decent full-face helmet nowadays? Sources recommended?



Thanks.

Bill
 

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The helmet companies tell us to replace your helmet every 3-5 years due to breakdown of the materials that they are made from. Here's what Snell states:

The five year replacement recommendation is based on a consensus by both the helmet manufacturers and the Snell Foundation. Glues, resins and other materials used in helmet production over time can affect liner materials. Hair oils, body fluids and cosmetics, as well as normal "wear and tear" all contribute to helmet degradation. Petroleum based products present in cleaners, paints, fuels and other commonly encountered materials may also degrade materials used in many helmets possibly degrading performance. Additionally, experience indicates there will be a noticeable improvement in the protective characteristic of helmets over a five year period due to advances in materials, designs, production methods and the standards. Thus, the recommendation for five year helmet replacement is a judgment call stemming from a prudent safety philosophy.



As for a new full face helmet you should look to spend $100-$150 (retail)on a name brand helmet, much more then that and you are paying for gizmoz, gadgets and paint under most cases that is. Now you will see that many companies will offer light weight or multi purpose type helmets look to spend $200-$600 there.

One thing to really keep in mind is that you must try on your new helmet and know how to check for proper fit before you lay down the cash! I can not stress that enough to people If it does not fit you might as well have just put the box on your head!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
That's a big help. Thanks! I currently have two (4 including my ex-wife's) colormatched helmets and I know about the fit. Everytime I got a haircut in the old days, they got too loose ;-)



Guess I'll start looking...since my new CX is black I'll probably keep with that simple theme.
 

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You are in a 25 year old technology helmet.



It's been bumped, dropped, sun baked, and whatever else.

The foam core has been drying out for 25 years.



Call Danielle at 1-800 Cycle Gear.



Tell her that her husband says you need a new helmet. She'll take care of you.
 

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You are in a 25 year old technology helmet.



It's been bumped, dropped, sun baked, and whatever else.

The foam core has been drying out for 25 years.



Call Danielle at 1-800 Cycle Gear.



Tell her that her husband says you need a new helmet. She'll take care of you.




does that go for every one tim
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I'll do that, Timothy, but I'm doing some reading up on them first so that I have some inkling of what I want. I generally ride with an open face helmet and glasses on the Aspencade, but on a no-fairing bike a full-face makes more sense to me. But I see there are hybrid helmets where the whole chin section raises. That appeals to me most but I suspect the cost is significantly higher. Are they in pretty common use? Has ther ever been a poll on the forum (maybe in the archives?) on what members wear?



Bill
 

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Regarding helmet styles:



Modular versus Full Face:



Modular helmets have a couple of issues that have not been resolved yet.

Cheap modulars (like Vega) are prone to an immediate and dangerous failure depending on how they are impacted.

The locking systems are generally plastic, and can pop up with minimal upward force.

Once a locking system fails, the helmet can become extremely dangerous.

After failure, and the chin bar comes up, it can break in any number of ways that can literally shred your face, or worse, break your neck.



More expensive modulars (like the Shark or Shoei) have a slightly better locking system made out of metal, but they still fail under moderate force, and still have the same dangers once the locking mechanism has failed.



To date, no modular helmet has passed a Snell test.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I guess nothing's foolproof, and I have to admit that I've ridden with my openface for 25 years (my fullface. Has been on the shelf all this time), but that doesn't mean anything if it hasn't been used (thankfully).



After reviewing a lot of the market this morning Ive been drawn to the HKC SY-MAX II modular. Good reviews, nice features, and moderate price. But it's sure good to get this sort of feedback from the group!
 

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I'm a fan of the KBC fullface helmets and if you try them on locally theres a better chance that you can find them for half price on ebay or other good sources.



I bought a KBC VR3 helmet online in june for $50 shipped in the original box from a dealer. Still had the $189 price tag on it. My local dealer wanted $220.



I wear black helmets because they match my bike.
 

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I bought a KBC TK-8 on ebay on a closeout 3 years ago for 60 bucks. Came in plastic, original box with all the regristration stuff



Guess I should do it again
 

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Regarding helmet styles:



Modular versus Full Face:



Modular helmets have a couple of issues that have not been resolved yet.

Cheap modulars (like Vega) are prone to an immediate and dangerous failure depending on how they are impacted.

The locking systems are generally plastic, and can pop up with minimal upward force.

Once a locking system fails, the helmet can become extremely dangerous.

After failure, and the chin bar comes up, it can break in any number of ways that can literally shred your face, or worse, break your neck.



More expensive modulars (like the Shark or Shoei) have a slightly better locking system made out of metal, but they still fail under moderate force, and still have the same dangers once the locking mechanism has failed.



To date, no modular helmet has passed a Snell test.


Many modular helmet have gone to metal locking devices, but they are not foolproof yet.



At the same time almost no one has submitted modular helmets to Snell for testing because they know they won't pass.



In the middle of this, there is a great debate whether the Snell or the DOT test is is better suited for judging helmet suitability for the street.



Snell's test is so rigid that many say that a street rider would probably be dead in a crash for other reasons.



Snell's test is thought to be better suited for racers on a track that don't impact anything but the ground or the insides of a race car.
 

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Before buying a Snell aproved helmet you may want to research an article titled "Blowing the lid off". It made me go out and buy a European specification helmet. A brand new Snell stickered helmet sits unused in my garage. The article is now at least 5 years old but still has great info
 

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I am sure somewhere there is data from research that shows what the typical impact zone is for a helmeted rider in various situations. I wonder what the most common impact points are? Would any of the most common ones be in such an area to put a modular at the high failure risk point, i.e. the locking mechanism? For example, how many impacts are at the under-the-chin spot, vs. the cheek areas, or the ear areas. Surely, in a head on, one would expect a downward force to the head, with a subsequent whip lashing upward, but would an impact at that point then be severe enough to cause a failure of the mechanism? Seems to me most of the impacts I've seen are towards the top quarters of the helmet, either front or side or back, not so much on the lower quarters. Any thoughts here?



The definite comfort factors of modulars are a big plus for me. I have two, one being my main ride, a Nolan I got used from a good friend, in very good condition. ( I actually got 3 helmets in that deal for $80 bucks) I also have an Ebay one that feels weird to me, but fits tight and right. I got it for around $50 +- The brand is little known, so is the quality, but if anyone is interested I'll be happy to sell it for $40 +shipping. Never ridden with it, since I got the Nolan at the same time, and I love that one better.



Joel in the Couve
 

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The question is what standard are motorcycle racers using? I saw that guy in the arai helmet bounce off the pavement 7 or so times.
 

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I'm riding with a $400 Shoei RF-1000 full face helmet not because I wanted to spend that much but because it was the only one I could find to fit my head. I wear a 3XL and the play list is a little short. I would love to have a color matched helmet but the wine colored RF-1000 only goes up to 2XL. My size is only available in primary colors so I've got a black helmet. I added some reflective tape to jazz it up a little and make me more visible at night.



Frankly, you've been lucky all these years. Many accidents end up with a face plant being part of its scenario. Road rash on my pretty face isn't what I have planned for myself. I don't think you'd enjoy it either.
 

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While you may think that bouncing on the road may be bad, the impact you really need to worry about is when you run your head into the curb or some other object. It sends the brain sliding up into the jagged peaks inside your skull and it also compresses your spine.



So, any amount of distance you can supply to slow down before you stop helps.



There is an old driver education statement that says, the crash will never kill you ... it is the stop after the crash.



That is why seatbelts stretch and the foam compresses in your helmet. The longer you can make the stopping distance the better your chances of surviving.



I just finished watching the video ... and the corner workers should be shot!!! You never pull the helmet off a person like shown in this video. If he had a broken neck he would have died because of the corner workers.
 
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