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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This is the year I am going to have to bite the bullet and buy some heated gear. Just wondering if anyone out there has any experience with some of the new battery powered heated glove, vests and socks or shoe soles. It would make my life simpler if I don't have to provide electrical connections on both bikes. What I have been seeing is gear that claims a 3 to 6 hour heating period before recharging the battery. In thinking about my riding habits I never ride more than an hour at one time. A Sunday may cover 3 or 4 hours but I would have breaks to change batteries if needed. What do you think, comments?



Gene
 

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Never Have used heated clothes. I just think "warm" thoughts...



As a bicycle racer, I used to stuff newspaper or a space blanket under my jersey on cold descents or if got dark/cold while out training. I've also done this while freezing on a motorcycle ( a brown paper bag makes a great layer of insulation) Then Park for Coffee if it's dangerously cold (hypothermia)... Never much on being plugged in, or filling my socks with lighter fluid




One thing My Dad used to let us do when it got too cold in the duck blind was let my Bros. and I unload our shotguns at an incoming raft of dos gris... we never hit much of anything, but "Happiness is a Warm Gun" took on a whole new meaning. I figure as a P.O., you might carry the tools to implement this emergency procedure
 

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This is the year I am going to have to bite the bullet and buy some heated gear. Just wondering if anyone out there has any experience with some of the new battery powered heated glove, vests and socks or shoe soles. It would make my life simpler if I don't have to provide electrical connections on both bikes. What I have been seeing is gear that claims a 3 to 6 hour heating period before recharging the battery. In thinking about my riding habits I never ride more than an hour at one time. A Sunday may cover 3 or 4 hours but I would have breaks to change batteries if needed. What do you think, comments?



Gene


I guess it might be worth a shot with the battery stuff Gene, but these are my thoughts...



I really like my heated gear which I made myself using gear I already had, and about $100 worth of wire etc. They really do make motorcycling an enjoyable year round activity here in SE PA. If I am riding with my quilted/heated jacket and pants liners set to "toasty" I really haven't needed to heat my feet or hands. I guess that the body's need to maintain core temps is being taken care of by the 12 volts/120 watts surging through my gear, and there is no need to rob heat from my hands, head and feet. Very comfy! Especially at temps above 30 F I find I don't bother with the heated gloves. I just use a pair of warm winter riding gloves.The hassle of changing/carrying batteries was a deal killer for me when looking for heated gear last year. The prices were a turnoff as well. I purchased a 100 foot roll of 30AWG silvered 7 strand Teflon coated wire from a vendor on eBay, and went to radio shack for the control switches and relays. If I was doing it again I would probably just go for the connection kits by WarmGear or Gerbings for my connectors etc. It really wasn't difficult wiring the bike. You just connect two wires to the battery. The only thing that complicated my installation was my desire to control the heat from my handlebars. I needed to install switches and relays etc. If you just want a simple on and off system they sell inline switch kits.



If I am running long distances at night I do use the heated gloves. Especially when the temps fall into the 20's. The insoles not so much because of an annoying bump right under my insteps and the fact that my feet really don't get cold when my torso is warm. The insoles are Gerbings and cost almost as much as all my other heated gear put together.



My advice is to start with a wired heated jacket liner, and add pants, gloves and insoles in that order if you need them. It my be the jacket is all you need. I am not confident the jacket liner could be powered by batteries and still put out the kind of heat you would be happy with. All the battery operated stuff I have has been a disappointment as to battery life, but I have not tried the battery powered heated gear. The ready made 12V jackets come with glove and pants connectors, so adding them later is not a big deal. Here is a link to some heated gear that seems like a good deal compared to a lot of it out there. WarmGear



Wishing you a comfy and safe winter riding season!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Nolavox, thanks for the suggestion! Now let me see if I understand correctly, when my hands get cold I stop, unlimber my shotgun, blaze away for 5 or 6 rounds, then hold the barrel until my paws are warm. Sounds good to me!

Gene



PS: How do I stuff the damn gun in my boots to warm my tootsies?



PPS: uh oh, I just bet you're going to tell me where to stuff the gun when other parts are cold.
 

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Nolavox, thanks for the suggestion! Now let me see if I understand correctly, when my hands get cold I stop, unlimber my shotgun, blaze away for 5 or 6 rounds, then hold the barrel until my paws are warm. Sounds good to me!

Gene



PS: How do I stuff the damn gun in my boots to warm my tootsies?



PPS: uh oh, I just bet you're going to tell me where to stuff the gun when other parts are cold.


Here is another idea Gene, put heat and bike controls into your Hanigan, and ride in there!
 

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This came up over at the Milwaukee Vintage Moto group and in the end the battery stuff cost more and you had to buy your own batteries.



I use a tourmaster synergy vest and it was well worth they money I paid. Now they cost about $125 and get the one with the collar because you want your neck warm. It comes with a harness for one bike and then you can buy another harness for $7.
 

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Gene,



Unless you plan to use the gear in a deer stand or something like that I would forget the idea of an auxiliary battery. It is just one wire per bike and should take no more than 5-10 minutes to hook up per bike.



The GL will have enough extra power to run both a heat jacket and pants at the same time, unless you sit for an hour at idle. The ST will never have an issue. I have a thermostat that I keep either on my tank bag or in my jacket pocket. The on/off switch is a pain in the butt, as you will be hot then cold, then hot .... etc. Pay the $40-50 bucks and get comfortable right away.



With a thermostat you set it to the level you want and forget it!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks fellows, this is the kind of help I knew I would get. I am taking these suggestions and any future ones under consideration. I will say that I am not eliminateing battery powered gear from consideration. The thin gloves interest me for a non-motorcycle reason. The arithritis in my hands and thumbs is getting worse and there may come a time when I will wear them in the house as the heat helps, a lot! The shotgun idea interests me, I can carry it in the sidecar but I guess I need some short of boot, like the cowboys used for their long guns! Besides, don't forget I'm the one who brought his bike to the Amish rally on too small a pickup! Anyone want to buy a 600lb capacity motorcycle carrier for the rear of your (big) pickup?

Gene



PS: How much do shotgun shells cost, I have not bought any in a loooonnnnnngggg time!
 

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hi Gene, MCN (Motorcycle Consummer News) 4/10 issue did a nice "Heated Gear Comparison" THEIR SUMMARY: lINER 1ST PLACE -fIRSTgEAR wARM & sAFE ; vESTS- 1ST PLACE exo 2 sTORMRIDER bODYWARMER Gloves- 1st Gerbings G3

The good news- more venders have entered the market,- product innovation is increasing, costs moderating.

I have older Gerbing jacket liner and gloves,- some bought used and economical. New models are lighter, and you can feel the wiring less.

Works good, but can be a hassle to suit up. Sam
 

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Sorry, can't help you Gene. I've never lived anyplace where it gets cold enough to make it worth while buying heated gear. I used to fly open air ultralights at temps down to 15F. and never needed heated gear. Just good quality winter clothing. I know a few people who wear heated gear when they go snow mobiling, but most of my friends don't use heated gear, and they ride at temps down to 30 below or colder. Maybe you have to be born and raised in the North in order to have a cold resistant body.



As for bike riding, I put my bike away in the winter, not because of the temperature so much but because of the inevitable icy road condition. But I'm not as cold resistant as I used to be. When I was a teen I used to keep my little 2 cycle bike in the house, so it would start, and ride almost every day. I don't think that heated garments had been invented then.
 

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This came up over at the Milwaukee Vintage Moto group and in the end the battery stuff cost more and you had to buy your own batteries.



I use a tourmaster synergy vest and it was well worth they money I paid. Now they cost about $125 and get the one with the collar because you want your neck warm. It comes with a harness for one bike and then you can buy another harness for $7.


I have this same vest, and the oxford heated grip wraps. Even when idling the voltage does not drop below 12v with both on (Vest on high) When running above 3k rpm, the alternator was still getting out 14V with both on. BTW the tourmaster vest is really warm, and the grip wraps are pretty slick too.



I have the bigger alternator, but if Stitch can run it on his bike you should have no problems.



Mike
 

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I never thought I would be wimpy enough to want heated gear either, till I tried it!



Now, when its cool, with my 12v jacket liner I can ride longer without getting tense and tired from the cold. I figure it has extended my riding season by almost a month spring and fall.



I like the Warm Gear brand: http://cozywinters.com/heated-clothing/



They use the standard coax type connections so it is compatible with other heated gear like Gerbing, H-D, etc., and their Heat Troller thermostat is top notch.
 

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doralh:

As for bike riding, I put my bike away in the winter, not because of the temperature so much but because of the inevitable icy road condition. But I'm not as cold resistant as I used to be. When I was a teen I used to keep my little 2 cycle bike in the house, so it would start, and ride almost every day. I don't think that heated garments had been invented then.



I'm totally with you on that although my highly modded Honda Elsinore MT250 2-stroke was my main means of transportation during two of the worst winters we had in the very late 1970s. Even with the knobby tires it was rideable on glare ice if you kept your feet down, and despite being kept outside it started right up every time, probably because we had it jetted a bit rich for all but the tuned powerband.



Layers of clothing - an undershirt, shirt, sweater and ski jacket did the job with gloves and long johns on the colder days. It is true what they say - if you keep the main part of your body warm it more freely allows blood to reach the extremities.



Now I'm much older and with a far heavier bike in a far less than friendly riding area. The college town was full of bicycles and pedestrians and lacking huge SUVs with cell phone addicts driving them in the autopilot mode. Some of these people honestly believe they're driving a GPS guided M1 Abrams tank and could care less.
 

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Sorry, can't help you Gene. I've never lived anyplace where it gets cold enough to make it worth while buying heated gear. I used to fly open air ultralights at temps down to 15F. and never needed heated gear. Just good quality winter clothing. I know a few people who wear heated gear when they go snow mobiling, but most of my friends don't use heated gear, and they ride at temps down to 30 below or colder. Maybe you have to be born and raised in the North in order to have a cold resistant body.



As for bike riding, I put my bike away in the winter, not because of the temperature so much but because of the inevitable icy road condition. But I'm not as cold resistant as I used to be. When I was a teen I used to keep my little 2 cycle bike in the house, so it would start, and ride almost every day. I don't think that heated garments had been invented then.


Uh Doral, you live here in Alberta, I think that qualifies for "cold enough" at least for me. Times like now when its around freezing but no snow yet for sledding, I still like to get out on the bikes.



As far as wearing snowmobiling clothing on a motorbike, well it gets a little restrictive and you look like the "Michelin



Man".



Gene, hardwire your bikes and go with any/all the heated clothing you can and extend your riding season to the max in a



warm and comfy way.



I dislike riding when I am cold/wet.
 

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As far as wearing snowmobiling clothing on a motorbike, well it gets a little restrictive and you look like the "Michelin

Man".



Gene, hardwire your bikes and go with any/all the heated clothing you can and extend your riding season to the max in a

warm and comfy way.






The new Oxford heated grips I ordered Monday on the recommendation of MCN arrived yesterday afternoon. I'll probably install them today sometime. The older Trackside heated grips were OK but these get about 60 degrees warmer according to the article. What's more, the Oxfords are warmer at 2 minutes than the Tracksides are after 10 minutes.



Film at 11....
 

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Nolavox, thanks for the suggestion! Now let me see if I understand correctly, when my hands get cold I stop, unlimber my shotgun, blaze away for 5 or 6 rounds, then hold the barrel until my paws are warm. Sounds good to me!

Gene



PS: How do I stuff the damn gun in my boots to warm my tootsies?



PPS: uh oh, I just bet you're going to tell me where to stuff the gun when other parts are cold.


LOL I just remember the two coldest times I've ever experienced... Being in the duck blind and on a bike. Man did that warm barrel feel good, (IN MY HANDS)
nothing felt good on the bike after I got chilled. YMMV




On second thought, I'd get more traditional warming gear for saftey (and comfort) reasons
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
LOL I just remember the two coldest times I've ever experienced... Being in the duck blind and on a bike. Man did that warm barrel feel good, (IN MY HANDS)
nothing felt good on the bike after I got chilled. YMMV




On second thought, I'd get more traditional warming gear for saftey (and comfort) reasons


Yeah, I agree, the shells were going to cost too much anyway.
 

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Here's another one for the Emergency Hand warmer needs...



As a field audio recordist for the networks I used wireless microphone systems Using 9v transistor radio batteries on a daily basis. As it was generally a "no second chance" situation, I would swap out batteries with maybe 80% of their life. Sometimes more for 100% mission critical apps. ( Live Shots)... I ended up with lot's of partially drained 9v batteries. And then a friend showed me...




If you have surplus 9v batteries, take two and plug them together top to top. They will get nice and warm... two brand new ones and you can give your buddies a "Hot Foot"...




From experience, Just do not put a 9v battery in your pocket with your keys...






I wonder how many forum members know what a "hot foot" is
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
nolavox, I wonder what the chances are for any sort of explosion doing that with the batteries. Anyway, your comment about not sticking them in with your keys reminds me of a funny incident (to me, not the victim) that happened a number of years ago. At the time I was President of the Atlanta Amateur Radio Club. Each year we provided communications for a number of events. For a while this included the "Great Raft Race on the Chattahoochie River". They finally put a stop to the race because it made such a mess of the river. But in its heyday litterally thousands of people were on the river in anything that would float. There is a federal park along the river and park rangers were also involved. I was taking a break from trying to keep drunken fools from drowning themselves and was walking toward a concession trailer. Suddenly a ranger walking down the road in front of me starting dancing around like a wild man. I noticed smoke & and then flames coming from his right front pocket., he was literally on fire! What happened was that he had switched nicad batteries on his handy talkie and without thinking had dropped the depleted(?) battery in his pocket. When we got the fire out and the battery out of his pocket his car keys were welded across the top of the battery. He had a nasty burn on his leg but we had medics that took care of him. Those batteries come with a little plastic strip that you slide over the contacts when not in use. Well, at least at the time it was funny, sorry to be so long.

Gene
 
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