Honda CX 500 Forum banner
1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
103 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My bike's head covers are corroded and I'm thinking about buying some replacements off ebay. How difficult is it to replace the head covers? Do I have to drain the oil, replace the gasket, etc if I take the head covers off? -A
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
95 Posts
Its an easy job. Two top valve cover screws hold the valve cover on. Valve cover gasket and the spark plug hole gasket are candidates for replacement if deteriorated. No need to drain or replace the oil for valve cover replacement.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
209 Posts
If you are talking the covers no not really. I would change the oil if the enviroment your doing it in is dirty/dusty.



But really its a matter of taking 2 nuts off and pulling the covers. As for the gaskets you should probably replace them but again, if your lazy you can probably get by without doing so. I know i took off my covers last year to adjust the tappets and said screw it on the gaskets and it doesn't leak oil so i never bothered to replace them.



It also helps mine haven't hardened up and began to crack.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
23,089 Posts
While these of course can be repolished it can be very time consuming depending on the equipment you have at hand and you don't want to have your bike off the road just to be polishing a pair of valve covers.



If you can pick up a pair on ebay etc. at a reasonable price I'd go for it, even if these themselves need repolishing, at least your bike will be on the road while you're doing them.



I keep 2 sets of these for my bike so I can swap them at services and have until next service to have a pair repolished to swap over again. Ditto the oil filter case as these can be a real mongrel to polish too.



Once these parts have had the initial polish done on them it doesn't take a lot of effort to keep them shiny.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,241 Posts
This all depends on the price of the valve covers, you're looking at.....myself, I couldn't even see buying different ones. I doubt you need to replace the gaskets, but then again I can't see yours, but they are not a throw away type gasket and are kept moist by the oil....mine are 30 yrs old too and I doubt they look any different than they did in 1982.



As stated above it's not hard to keep them shiney once you get them shiney the first time...don't even need to take them off the bike to keep them shiney so IF the ones you're looking to buy are NOT already polished then what is it going to save you in effort ??



EDIT: I guess what I mean by all this is if you're worried about the valve covers being shiney then you're gonna want the rest of the aluminum shiney as well and I don't think you want to spend the money to replace everything so ya might as well learn to polish....it's not too difficult and gives you something to do when you're not riding the bike (which is most of the time if you think about it...right ?)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
103 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I purchased a second set from ebay last night for $18. My thought is (as suggested in previous post) that I can take my time polishing them up and not incur any downtime on the bike except for the actual swap. The rest of the bike is spotless except for the oil filter and clutch covers. I can deal with them over the winter. Thanks for all the advice everyone. -A
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,601 Posts
An important note: DO NOT try to start polishing them until you've stripped the heavy, tough clear coat off them or you'll just burn up a lot of time ending up with nothing more then clear coat with polishing compound embedded in it. Get a good paint stripper, (preferably one that contains methylene chloride as the active ingredient) on of those 0.49 paint brushes, a small nylon scrub brush and a paper cup. Pour a few ounces of the stripper in the cup and apply to the heads. In no time you'll see the old clear coat starting to bubble up. Wait until it's done all it can do (about 10 minutes, don't let it dry) then scrub it off under a stream of warm water with a nylon scrub brush. If you put the stripper on thickly you'll usually get it all the first time, if not go over them again.



When dealing with methylene chloride based paint strippers ALWAYS wear gloves and old clothing as skin contact will cause an intense burning sensation in about 60 seconds. If you do accidentally get any on you wipe it off with a towel and paint thinner (if you have it) followed by several washings with warm very soapy water. If caught fast enough you'll be fine, if it's already started to burn it will subside in about an hour but it won't leave any marks or redness.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
23,089 Posts
Hadn't thought of that, I still do the whole wet and dry and hand polish. The first grade of which gets to rip off the clearcoat and corrosion all in one hit. Tedious, but it works.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top