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I hate how a lot of gear is excessively flashy and busy, always appreciate a simple black/brown/yellow glove. Do they seem like they'd take a slide well?
 

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Looking for cold weather gauntlet gloves?
I bought these for $13.00 free shipping I see the price has gone up to $16.99 free shipping
They are Thinsulated and high quality leather. I was really surprised!
I will waterproof them.

View attachment 203663 View attachment 203664

pricing seems good, they only list XL size-maybe thats all thats left.
Was yours XL? and what did this approximate, a size 10?

I am a believer in having a range of gloves rather than trying to find one glove for all seasons.
Even a GORTEX lined glove needs to be allowed to dry once wet (mainly for comfort)...so you need a "back-up"
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I hate how a lot of gear is excessively flashy and busy, always appreciate a simple black/brown/yellow glove. Do they seem like they'd take a slide well?
The insulation is thick. The knuckles have stitching that gives extra protection there. The palms have a double stitched layer, but it mostly falls where the palm touch the handgrips. No metal plate

pricing seems good, they only list XL size-maybe thats all thats left.
Was yours XL? and what did this approximate, a size 10?

I am a believer in having a range of gloves rather than trying to find one glove for all seasons.
Even a GORTEX lined glove needs to be allowed to dry once wet (mainly for comfort)...so you need a "back-up"
There are different sizes: S/M/L/XL I usually wear an XL glove and the XL fits me the way I like it. I like it not too tight so as to allow a liner glove. I have several sets of leather gloves. My Joe Rockets are summer weight. Also have an thinsulate pair of deerskin gloves I am wearing as fall gloves. These new ones are for when it is in the 30*F and lower. I'll wear them on my electric bike when snow and ice makes me put the GLs away.. My e-bike has studded Schwalbe winter tires. It is my Winter bike until I get a Sidecar.
 

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Those look a lot like the Ural gloves I wear in spring & fall (at one time they were available with a bunch of bike brands embroidered on the gauntlets; mine were a door prize at a CURD rally). From the beginning I found the gauntlets a bit tight to pull over the sleeves of my jacket ans after a couple of years the thinsulate linings wore through while the leather outers looked like new so I removed the linings and bought some cheap thinsulate gloves on eBay that don't have gauntlets to put inside the leather shells and now I can remove the liners to wash them and the un-lined gauntlets are a good fit over my sleeves.

BTW: I keep telling you guys: Even the warmest gloves are not suitable for cold weather. When it gets much below freezing you need mitts (that's mittens, not handlebar muffs, although muffs can help) so that your fingers are all in the same space and the heat each finger gives off is available for keeping the others warm. Snowmobile mitts are designed to work with handlebars so they are usually the best choice.
 

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BTW: I keep telling you guys: Even the warmest gloves are not suitable for cold weather. When it gets much below freezing you need mitts (that's mittens, not handlebar muffs, although muffs can help) so that your fingers are all in the same space and the heat each finger gives off is available for keeping the others warm. Snowmobile mitts are designed to work with handlebars so they are usually the best choice.
Yup once it gets to zero (Celsius) combined with wind-chill, and drizzle/sleet many a hand has been left agonizingly numb.
Water-proof leather gloves usually have a membrane to keep you dry (Hypora/Gortex) and can still get waterlogged...I've had good experience with over-mitts (e.g.the economical oilskin) when in Tasmania..which is close to the South Pole..maybe a lil like Canada (reversed) ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #8
BTW: I keep telling you guys: Even the warmest gloves are not suitable for cold weather. When it gets much below freezing you need mitts (that's mittens, not handlebar muffs, although muffs can help) so that your fingers are all in the same space and the heat each finger gives off is available for keeping the others warm. Snowmobile mitts are designed to work with handlebars so they are usually the best choice.
I've been watching for a used low mileage or "Not current" NC750x I hope to buy in November. I just saw a local 2012 Ural for about the same price. But my first goal is a bike for touring, then a sidecar or a Ural for my dog and winter riding.
Currently, my winter ride is my eBike with studded winter tires and these gauntlets will probably do fine in the winter on the ebike with the lower wind speeds and pedal assist to help circulation and keeping warm.
 
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As an aside, I was thinkin also to experiment with a full kevlar glove and over-glove..next Australian winter.....the Kevlars are also a good workshop glove,cut resistant and abrasion resistant and somewhat heat retardant....
 

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I searched. I had no idea that Kevlar was so affordable, less than $10.00 for work gloves.
Here are an interesting pair with sleeves covering the arm past the elbow:

 

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Those are actually fairly expensive (not to mention the questionability of protective gerar that leaces the fingers exposed). These are a much better price

BTW: While we're talking gloves, I bought a set of these a few years ago (on sale for about half price, of course) and carry them with my rainsuit. They aren't the most comfortable gloves I have but they are absolutely waterproof and their gauntlets overlap the rainsuit's sleeves far enough that my hands don't even get damp in the hardest rain
 

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Those are actually fairly expensive (not to mention the questionability of protective gerar that leaces the fingers exposed). These are a much better price
I shared both types (fingerless and fingered) and also gloves unders $10.00. We were talking about glove liners.
The "armored" gear isn't so much for keeping you from breaking bones as it is for abrasion.
My mesh jacket is armored, but my leather jacket isn't. Kevlar arm covers might enhance their protection.

I was originally searching from my phone. Now I am at my desk. Here are some $10.00 sleeves. I'm going to get some type of hand/sleeve kevlar for my cold weather leather. Search for leggings too.

It is interesting to me because I was looking for my cotton sleeves I used in Japan during the stoking of the wood fired kiln to cover my wrists before I got the Gauntlets

. When you search protective gear, there are all sorts of chainsaw related protective clothing that might double on the motorcycle. I'd like something abrasion resistant to wear under jeans.


$12.00 Sleeves (Cut resistance level 5 but not kevlar.)

 

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The gauntlets solved my problem with my leather jacket that has snap sleeves. I was getting air in the crack of the sleeves and these gauntlets cover that area in 34*F weather.
I bought Kevlar sleeves. They don't cover the elbows the way the photos show. Maybe a larger size would work better. I got fingerless that cover the palms and knuckles. I figured if you were wearing sleeves, you'd have to take off your jacket to bare your fingers to operate touch screens, so I went fingerless. The finger parts cover the base of the fingers to below the first knuckle, but have no gaps between the fingers so those have to push in to get into the gloves. I might cut the seams and that might help the sleeves ride up and cover the elbows.
 

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I hate how a lot of gear is excessively flashy and busy, always appreciate a simple black/brown/yellow glove. Do they seem like they'd take a slide well?
I have landed on my knuckles before...I only wear gloves that are armored over the knuckles and joints. But to get that it's basically like I have to have an old school t-max...
 

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Discussion Starter #16 (Edited)
I have landed on my knuckles before...I only wear gloves that are armored over the knuckles and joints. But to get that it's basically like I have to have an old school t-max...
If I were riding in the woods, on dirt and gravel, I'd have armored gloves if I didn't have handguards.
I was inspired by bahn88 to try Kevlar as liners. For summer, I'll probably get kevlar liner gloves. They could be worn over the fingerless sleeves.
My kevlar sleeves will also be used for firing woodfired ceramic kilns. They are flame/heat resistant. I am also considering a Kevlar neck gaiter.
I've seen footage of people faceplanting after a crash wearing a full helmet. Often their chins get abrasion from inside the helmet. A Kevlar gaiter might help with that. It is another item I could use when firing a kiln.
Looking for kevlar knee/shin protection too.
 

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As an aside some time ago I remember reading that the most common "hand injury" for road riding/road race (yes they are different but can't remember which the stats referred to....) was the 'pinky" i.e.litlle finger being broken (or worse)...leading to some glove manufacturers to have "Webbed gloves" where the pinky of the glove is attached to the adjacent finger.....
 

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Gold top windbeaters for me. Proper old school lambs wool lined gauntlet.
Great on cold,cold days, but not massively waterproof, and expensive. GoldTop are a british bike clothing firm, that have been going for decades.
 

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Gold top windbeaters for me. Proper old school lambs wool lined gauntlet.
Great on cold,cold days, but not massively waterproof, and expensive. GoldTop are a british bike clothing firm, that have been going for decades.
Heres my monologue.....
My longer rides are generally gortex Rukka/Held..(bought off-season at substantial savings)but as per earlier posting a range of gloves is what suits me best....I have ripped the lining of boots trying to remove soggy boots from rain or 40 Celsius days touring before:( so having spares for touring or multiple rides has been my practice.

I have previously bought alpine-stars gloves (NOT top of range) for $100 that have lasted less than a month....but bought the unknown brand of thinsulate glove +/- hypora for about $20 that lasted 2years plus (lost 1 glove.....so maybe could have lasted 4-5 years....lol.)

Are the Gold-top still UK made?....my last set of BMW gloves (2010) were made in Pakistan....were great and lasted bout years before some "leather rot" started to hole the palm pressure points.....on your recommendation these might be some gloves to try in future...
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Gold top windbeaters for me. Proper old school lambs wool lined gauntlet.
Great on cold,cold days, but not massively waterproof, and expensive. GoldTop are a british bike clothing firm, that have been going for decades.
Here in Minnesota we call the deerskin mittens with wool liners "Choppers."

My gauntlets are not waterproof but is will spray waterproofing on them. I carry waterproof liners with my rain gear in my saddlebags.
 
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