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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, I'm doing a full rebuild and I have a hard time choosing a type of grease
I know I will at least need to grease :
the steering bearings (I have tapered ones)
the input and output gears of the final drive
the final drive
the driveshaft
the camshaft
(did I forgot something?)

The Haynes manual says "multi purpose grease", "high temp multi purpose grease", even "lithium based multi purpose grease" for the final drive and as a beginner it's a bit confusing for me
I guess an average multi purpose grease will do the job for a couple thousand miles but I might as well do things properly
Any tips for the best type of grease to use
I heard about the famous Moly 60
 

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The final drive takes hypoid gear oil, not grease. The input and out put gears are inside the final drive, same gear oil. The camshaft is lube by the engine oil; unless you are referring to assembly lube. The drive splines on the final drive and wheel and the driveshaft are lubed with moly containing lithium grease meeting NLGI 2 specs. There are brake specific greases for the brake calipers. Moly 60 can be used for the swing arm bearings and suspension pivots.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank you for the lithium grease specs. That is something I couldn't find anywhere
(When I said input and output gears I meant the splines)
The final drive on my cx500d has a grease fitting so I assumed it had to be greased

Another question to which no answer can be found in the manuals :
What about rust on the teeth around the splines (the parts that screw in)

I also have a very fine not uniform layer of rust on the driveshaft and U-joint
Do you suggest removing a maximum of rust before applying moly, leaving it alone or trying to find a one in better shape ?
 

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You are correct, you need to grease the sliding joint on the drive shaft through the grease fitting on the final drive. That is not the same as the gear oil for the final drive.

Your other questions might be better answered if you posted a couple of pictures.

Do you have a copy of the Honda Factory Service Manual for your bike? It may be downloaded for free from the Wiki; see the link in my signature line.
 

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Do you have a copy of the Honda Factory Service Manual for your bike? It may be downloaded for free from the Wiki; see the link in my signature line.
What Mike said! It's all in there. Haynes and Clymer's are helpful, but also contain errors/omissions
 

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'84 CX650E that is evolving into a GL500
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Pics of the rust might help us tell you whether it needs to be dealt with but generally it should be removed if possible because it might be abrasive when mixed into grease.

As has already been said, download the Factory Shop Manual and use it as your primary reference (there's a link to the Wiki in my signature too). The FSM specifies "NLGI No. 2 lithium based grease with molybdenum additive", which is common "moly-lith" grease that you can get just about anywhere in cartridges that fit standard grease guns. It can be used anywhere on your CX500D that needs to be greased except for brake assemblies where you should use silicone based grease because it won't melt and run out onto friction materials like the regular stuff can (silicone grease is also good on rubber parts like the grommets that hold the side covers on and inside the ends of rad hoses to keep them from bonding to the metal parts).

BTW: Welcome to the forum. I see that you have added your location to your profile. Please also and your bike's model and model year to your signature (see Forum Settings link in my signature) so that you don't have to remember to tell us every time and we don't have to keep asking when you forget. If you have done that and it is not showing up because you are accessing the forum on a phone please add your bike's model number to the location part of your profile.

And welcome to the world of antique vehicle ownership. Your bike has had about 4 decades of Previous Owners who may or may not have done the maintenance necessary to keep it safe & reliable. It is highly recommended to go through all of the service procedures in the FSM, regardless of whether your bike has reached the specified mileage. I also recommend looking on all rubber parts with suspicion because rubber does not age gracefully. Check the date codes on your tires and replace them if they are over 5 years old no matter how good they look & feel because old rubber simply cannot flow around the irregularities in the asphalt well enough to grip, especially if it is cool or wet. If your bike still has the original rubber brake line(s) (should be replaced every 2 or 3 fluid changes = 5 or 6 years) start shopping for modern stainless braided ones (they last practically forever and double the life of the fluid).
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
The tires, gaskets and o-rings will be replaced
I've included pictures, you will probably understand why I don't feel okay reusing them in such condition
(the u-joint moves freely)

Do I just scrape off the rust ?
Do I use chemicals ?
or is it just a waste of time and I better start looking for some used parts in better condition ?
 

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'84 CX650E that is evolving into a GL500
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I wouldn't worry about the rust on the U-joint as long as it isn't in the splines. The rust that shows in the pics won't get any worse if you smear a bit of grease on the rusty area.

The ring with indents on the final drive is a bearing retainer (the indents are for bending tabs into to keep it from turning); A small amount of rust on it won't hurt anything. Again, the condition of the splines (which aren't clearly visible in any of the pics) that is important.
 
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