Honda CX 500 Forum banner
1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I finally got all the gaskets and various parts for the starter clutch and flywheel and am getting ready to button everything back up (fingers crossed). Is there any special prep for the gaskets, especially the rear cover? I didn't know if you need to use a sealer of some sort.



Thanks,

Adam
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
289 Posts
+1 Make sure there isn't any old gasket material left. A razor blade will make short work of stripping old gasket from the surfaces, but I will warn you that the aluminum can be taken away with a razor blade, too. Shallow angles and keeping the blade flat are the keys.



Make sure that you get all of the debris out of the parts before assembly! When dealing with assemblies with tight tolerances (engines, for example), hospital clean is a good start.




Once all of surfaces are free of gasket left-overs, I wipe the surfaces down with a clean towel wetted with acetone. This will take any oily residue away and leave you with good clean surfaces. From there, make sure the gaskets don't wrinkle up when mating the parts, follow torque specs and you should be good to go.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,517 Posts
What Linny said X 2. THE most important thing is that the two surfaces be as clean as you can get them. If you are using an OEM Honda(green) gasket, it comes pre-gooped with a thin coating of Hylomar. If you're using an aftermarket or homemade, you should give it a thin coating of Hylomar on both sides and a see-thru wetting of the stuff on the pieces to be joined.



Search this site for "Hylomar" and you'll see some specifics. As with any "goop", less is more, a thin coating is all you need.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,563 Posts
What Linny said X 2. THE most important thing is that the two surfaces be as clean as you can get them. If you are using an OEM Honda(green) gasket, it comes pre-gooped with a thin coating of Hylomar. If you're using an aftermarket or homemade, you should give it a thin coating of Hylomar on both sides and a see-thru wetting of the stuff on the pieces to be joined.



Search this site for "Hylomar" and you'll see some specifics. As with any "goop", less is more, a thin coating is all you need.
just to elaberate on Cobrams post,,,,,,let the hylomar dry,or near dry.



dont forget that you can get all your gears,before putting the engine back in
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,517 Posts
just to elaberate on Cobrams post,,,,,,let the hylomar dry,or near dry.


He will have a long, long wait, as Hylomar never dries or sets, that's it's best property and why it works so well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks guys. Yeah I have the OEM Honda gasket so should be good there. The manual says to use adhesive on the pulsar cover gasket. Any certain kind? Necessary?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,517 Posts
Thanks guys. Yeah I have the OEM Honda gasket so should be good there. The manual says to use adhesive on the pulsar cover gasket. Any certain kind? Necessary?




Get a tube of Hylomar and use it on all the gaskets. A very thin (see through) film is all you need. I used it on the surface of the parts being joined, even with the factory gaskets.



You will appreciate it's "tack off" (I KNOW that's gotta be Australian slang for something sexual), if you find that you have to take things apart again. Unlike silicone and other gasket sealers, you won't have to remove it all and re-apply. It will also keep the gaskets from moving or slipping while you assemble components.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Why do all British or former British colonies have cooler slang than the US, which, as a former British colony, doesn't really have cool slang?? Perhaps its the novelty of it?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,563 Posts
He will have a long, long wait, as Hylomar never dries or sets, that's it's best property and why it works so well.
mmm,ok,make sure OP,its a really,really fine smear
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
23,718 Posts
Australia has always had it's own brand of slang, although some of it second hand from the poms, Irish, Scots etc. but as American influence is rife in this country via the media much of our own slang is dying out. No offence meant here, just an observation.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
503 Posts
This may sound a bit wierd, but I have always used high temp (red) grease on both surfaces of the gasket. Holds the gasket in place, keeps the gasket soft and priable, and if any of it gets into the engine it will not harm it. Have rebuilt a few engines and never had a problem. It is inexpensive and available everywhere.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
23,718 Posts
Not weird at all. I tend to put gasket sealant on one side of the gasket and grease on the other. This allows disassembly leaving the gasket attached to the cover ready to reuse in many cases.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,422 Posts
Not weird at all. I tend to put gasket sealant on one side of the gasket and grease on the other. This allows disassembly leaving the gasket attached to the cover ready to reuse in many cases.


Ditto
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top