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Unfortunately, this is one of those articles written by someone with little knowledge of tyres that merely perpetuates a lot of untruths about certain tyres, or situations, mixed with a smaller smattering of basic facts. whilst it is not the intention of the writer to misdirect, that is the overall result on many occasions. Reading some of the comments from people responding to the article just goes to reinforce this, typically they reach conclusions they wish to be true to fit their situation rather than what it actually hapeening. The author's comments regarding grooves, slicks, chicken strips, and wear limit bars are almost totally incorrect
 

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"The author's comments regarding grooves, slicks, chicken strips, and wear limit bars are almost totally incorrect "



I freely admit that I don't know much about motorcycle tires. It would be helpful for people like me if you would state what the mistakes in the article and say what the corrections should be.
 

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"The author's comments regarding grooves, slicks, chicken strips, and wear limit bars are almost totally incorrect "



I freely admit that I don't know much about motorcycle tires. It would be helpful for people like me if you would state what the mistakes in the article and say what the corrections should be.


While the author didn't explain things 100% correct almost everything he said is true. For example, on the slicks ... when they are stressed really hard, usually from spinning and get extremely hot the rubber indeed does not have as much traction. What he fails to say is that for maximum traction the tires need to be somewhat hot without being overheated.



"Chicken strips" is a term that means a person doesn't lean the bike over as far as he could ... but most people, myself included, aren't capable of utilizing the full potential of our tires due to not enough training and practice and common sense too.



I could go on ... but I have to get up early tomorrow to go for a 350 mile round trip ride and go to the Slimey Crud Ride in Wisconsin. Maybe someone else can finish what I have started here.
 

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While the author didn't explain things 100% correct almost everything he said is true. For example, on the slicks ... when they are stressed really hard, usually from spinning and get extremely hot the rubber indeed does not have as much traction. What he fails to say is that for maximum traction the tires need to be somewhat hot without being overheated.



"Chicken strips" is a term that means a person doesn't lean the bike over as far as he could ... but most people, myself included, aren't capable of utilizing the full potential of our tires due to not enough training and practice and common sense too.



I could go on ... but I have to get up early tomorrow to go for a 350 mile round trip ride and go to the Slimey Crud Ride in Wisconsin. Maybe someone else can finish what I have started here.




I can vouch for Dave. He may say that he doesn't have the skill or stupidity to eliminate chicken strips but he makes you and I look like fradie cats. Following this guy through the twisties and watching those pegs go so low makes me ease of the throttle. If he says that a bagged gl500 or even cx500 cant use the whole tire then he is true.



If anyone can prove him wrong they just saved $0.25 getting the use out of the last piece of strip.



Ok better go get ready. I'm meeting up with Dave around 10ish or earlier. 100miles for me. 130 for him. Only question is how many miles for Scott in Iowa.
 

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Grooves (or sipes as they are correctly known) are much more technical than the author would suggest, and are primarily for either water clearance or looks dependant upon the tyre type. But to suggest a slick does not work in the rain is total nonsense, slicks work extremely well in the rain. If you could travel in a helicopter above a motorcycle on a wet road you would see a big bow wave emanating off the leading edge of the front tyre contact patch, which cuts a much drier track for the following bike. A slick in this situation works extremely well, lots of wet races are won doing this, cut slick front with full slick rear for maximum traction. What slicks dont tolerate well is standing water, which is different entirely. Look at most sport bike tyres, their patterns are mainly designed to look agressive with little design for water clearance ( other than careful sipe angles so they do not lose too much volume when compressed thereby reducing the throughput of water) but they still work well enough to provide more than adequate grip

The term chicken strips is something I find very annoying, as it leads to more self inflicted injuries than anything else. Unused tyre can be a sign of a rider not using the full extent of the tyre, for sure. But in more cases than not, it shows deficiency in the tyre contour on that particular rim width, and is therefore unable of being used - the pursuit of doing so leading to people overstepping the mark as poor shape means that the contact patch size is reducing as you lean further rather than increasing or maintaining a size.

Wear limit bars are also a quite contentious thing. For many years they were always set at 1mm of remained tread depth. But as speeds have risen and motorcycle stability ( at speed or laden) has lessened) certain companies have played with this to ensure tyres are "discarded" whilst still having usable life. Certain tyres now have wear bars set at 3mm remained tread depth, which is good for business. Therefore the discerning tyre buyer now needs to examine a "new" tread pattern from a brand much more thoroughly before he buys dependant upon the criteria he wishes to apply

True aquaplaning on a motorcycle tire is rare, and scary. In all my years riding, racing, testing and designing it has only happened a few times. What most people call aquaplaning is not that at all, but the vague" feel you get through the brake lever as torrents of water through the tyre surface grooves cause the tyre to momentarily slip then grip, or it is the tyre peaking up slightly as the crown temperature drops meaning less rubber is now in contact with the road (also caused by poor profile). Neither of these are aquaplaning which is a solid sheet of water under all tyre surface causing absolute sliding over which you have no control whatsoever. Best solution to aquaplaning is not copious amounts of throttle but mild counter steer, to make the front end "plow under" the wave front and restore at least some traction

whilst I can appreciate the author trying to keep it all simple, there is a danger in doing so, that old bad habits are not broken, and there are so many regarding bike tyres that riders, faced with certain dynamic situations make a bad choice in their reaction. Better then to narrow the scope of such articles and let them go into better depth on a smaller number of points, to make sure they are more effective, and informative
 

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Leo,

Thanks for that explanation, I find it interesting (but not shocking) that wear markers are being placed at 3mm instead



of 1mm by some mfgs. Though perhaps not a good way to just visually confirm a tire is worn out, I have been down to the



markers before, but thought they appeared to have quite a bit of life left. Would you have knowledge of a online



reference for decoding date of mfg stamps?



Thanks for your help.
 

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Trickster

Date codes are very simple codes that go in a 10yr cycle. Look around your sidewall ( normally on the left side of a rear tyre and the right side of a front) for a small block of numbers like 4305 ( week 43, or mid october of 2005). whilst you are at it, look around for the E number on the tyre which will tell you what country the tyre conformance specs were made to, and/or the US DOT code (6 numbers) which will tell you the 2 digit plant code ( what factory it was made in) and the last 4 digits again are the date code. any other block of numbers you might come across will almost certainly be the mould number itself, so the tyre can be traced back not only to where and when it was made, but out of what equiment. There will also be a serial number, which will denote the actual tire, in sequence from a batch size, so in case of a recall all manufacturers know at what point in production this happened so they can retrace their steps and find each and every tyre for recall. Also, read the max pressure listing. You will see that this has nothing to do with what pressure the tyre can use, but merely the pressure that had to be used under regulations to check the tyre conformity, and as such this must be one of the widest held incorrect beliefs of most motorcyclists

Below is a list of E code countrys

E1 Germany E2 France E3 Italy E4 Netherlands E5 Sweden E6 Belgium

E7 Hungary E8 Czech Republic E9 Spain E10 Yugoslavia

E11 United Kingdom E12 Austria E13 Luxembourg E14 Switzerland

( There is no E15 code)

E16 Norway E17 Finland E18 Denmark E19 Romania

E20 Poland E21 Portugal E22 Russian Federation

E23 Greece E24 Ireland E25 Croatia E26 Slovenia

E27 Slovakia E28 Belarus E29 Estonia

E31 Bosnia and Herzegovina E32 Latvia E34 Bulgaria

E37 Turkey E40 Macedonia E43 Japan

E45 Australia E46 Ukraine E47 South Africa

E48 New Zealand
 

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Leo,

Excellent info again,

Thank-you
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I'll agree, the "Maximum pressure" rating on a tire has mislead more people than you could imagine. If you don't know what you're doing always go by the owner's manual recommendations which is also now (probably by law) also printed elsewhere in a car or on most bikes I've seen.



Things come in different when I'm running my car. The one I have at present has a rather unusual suspension setup that only came out on a select few models, and on my previous (now in storage) "more of a racer" car the suspension was fairly modified. I tend to push steering response and overall lateral grip to the max at times so tire pressure is an important factor in the equation. If I corner hard enough to break contact I want the front and rear to break at the same time - not one before the other - so through careful trial and error I come up with the best combination of front and rear pressures I can run at for maximum performance that's still balanced as to understeer/oversteer. On my current GTP this worked out to be 34 front/36 rear, on my other one it was 36 front/38 rear. This is of course with a particular tire, changing to a different brand or model/style would have me starting all over again.



I'll never know on the bike, don't think I'm anywhere near as sharp a rider as I once was so I'll never get anywhere near experimenting by more than a couple of psi.
 
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