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I restored, my fork tubes, about three years back. One of them is now leaking. Mabey due to the cold, my install, or the quality of the seal. Not sure at this time where I ordered them from. Randakk's, Honda, not sure. Just disappointed that it has gone bad again so soon. Is there ones you have used that last longer ?
 

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I got new seals and wipers from All Balls on eBay. Great price and with synthetic ATF as fluid no leaks for 4 years. Be sure and inspect your tubes for any pitting, even minute pits can cause leaks.
 

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All balls is the way to go. Installed on all 3 bikes. Oldest 5-6 years ago and no leaks yet.
 
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The tubes have no pits. They look like new. I make sure they get cleaned each time before I ride. I will check on the rest of the information you all supplied. Thank you all. (y)
 
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Seal mate has worked well for me with FOD on the seal to fork tube mating surface. I carry one in my onboard tool kit.
 

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I have a sealmate, worked temporarily for me. Took about a week to start leaking again.
 

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Sealmate sounds like a worthwhile try before seal replacement for sure.
 

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My 79 GL1000 would occasionally weep from the fork seal even after I completed the restoration. We lived in a DUSTY area especially when the Santa Ana Winds howled through. It does not take much debris in a seal to create leakage. As soon as I saw any evidence of seeping I would run the seal mate around the wiped down fork tube and I would be good to go. That may have happened twice a year.
206416
 

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That is a nice looking ride GL!!! (y)
 
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If cleaning any debris out of the seals doesn't fix the problem and you end up taking them apart, check the stanchion of the one that is leaking to make sure it is straight. The proper way is to use V blocks and a dial gauge but you can usually tell enough by holding a straight edge against it at various points around the perimeter and looking for light between them.
The same seal failed a year after I got my GL500 and a year after that. The stanchion was about half a mm out of straight.
 

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All Balls is some of the shitty-ist products out there. Low low low end bearings / seals.

If you put less than 500 miles a year on, All Balls will ‘probably’ hold up to light use.

OEM Honda is barely a few bucks more.

Do as others suggested: re-clean area where seals seat, or check for slight ‘out of straight condition’, or you nicked one on installation.
 

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I'll second the All Balls comment - it's pretty cut rate stuff. However, they do have some oddball conversion bearings that no one else has. Otherwise, their bearings and seals don't last at all.

OEM seals are good (as long as they are new and not 40 year old new old stock, which might just perish on the shelf) but SKF has the best stuff out there. Not sure what the CX seal size is, but you can probably match it up in their interchange to see if they make some that fit.

As an off road racer where fork seals live in the worst possible conditions, SKF is all I use. Everything else ends up needing replaced a few times a year where I can get a few seasons out of SKF. I do use a seal saver/seal mate regularly. You can make one out of a cut up plastic soda bottle if you don't want to buy one.

One other thing to check is to make sure that your axle is set up right. tighten the axle nut, then loosen the right fork leg bottom to make sure the forks aren't being squeezed together or pushed apart, and retighten the bottom. The stock forks are pretty noodly, and any additional load on them makes them even more likely to leak or wear.

If you did not replace the fork bushings, that can also help. Worn bushings mean the tube won't be centered in the seal. Note that bushings also accumulate debris from the fork oil that gets embedded in the surface, which causes stiction. They can be causing sticktion without visibly being worn out, so there's a bonus reason for swapping them.

If you do have a pit or nick in the fork tube, a machinist stone can take any raised edge off and a dremel with a buffing wheel and aggressive compound can smooth the transition.
 

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That is the first time i've heard that all balls is crap. I'm not defending them, i've seen them used/recommended on this forum many times so i thought they were good. If i ever get to that point i will have to replace the fork seals so i won't go with ABs. I already bought steering head and wheel bearings from them so i will probably use them anyway since i already spent the money... :(
 

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FWIW, I last replaced the fork seals in both of my bikes in 2013. My annual mileage has decreased significantly since I retired in 2016 but for the first 3 years these seals were in I was putting a total of close to 20,000 Km per year on the 2 bikes so they have both had a good amount of use since and the seals are holding up just fine.
I bought generic fork seals on eBay, ordered using the dimensions because they are standard seals used on a lot of brands/models and there is nothing special about the Honda ones except that the bags they come in have Honda stickers.
 
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