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Discussion Starter · #81 ·
Project's still progressing, albeit even slower than before. I'll update if anything happens.
 

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Apparently, nothing's happened in quite a while. ;)
 

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I was looking at my tractor the other day, it to is a v-twin 80 degree engine. Intake looks like it will fit the cx.
 

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Was a fuel pump ever decided on?
I was thinking that one that works in my snowmobile Arctic Cat EFI system would work as it is 50PSI max output and uses a pressure cut off to tell the pump when to run and when not to. [basically cycles on and off at low speeds to keep rail pressure up and runs constantly at high rpm to keep up with demand]
There are the older units that require a battery to power the ECU and then there are the newer versions that run off the stator alone [no battery required].
These are a simpler system [read only rpm, air temp, and barometric pressure/altitude] and are very efficient. The later versions are also programmable with the proper connectors and software.
 

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I've really nothing constructive to add, without getting too far off topic.

Fuel pump / pressure, can be handled either actively, as in the fuel pump runs and the regulator returns excess fuel to the tank or can have the pump 'modulated' such that it only pumps when needed. Older fuel injection systems use a bypass regulator type system where the pump runs continuously but newer ones are controlling the pump directly in order to manage pressure. The Microsquirt system mentioned in this thread relies on constant fuel pump pressure and external pressure regulator, as in it cannot regulate the fuel pressure itself, though it is theoretically possible to modify the firmware yourself and deal with things.
 

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Discussion Starter · #91 · (Edited)
Hi, all. Still working on everything... slowly. It looks like my host server crashed a while ago, and the image URL's weren't preserved in previous posts -- I'll get them repaired in due time. Meanwhile, I've been trying to fit everything into the former airbox bay. Things are cramped, but it looks like I've got a design I'm happy with. The electrical diagram is almost ready as I have a handful of details to complete, and after that it's a matter of finding appropriate connectors. I'm hoping a wave of parts will be ordered in the next month to complete most of the wiring.







 

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Looking at things, I'm confused.
I see the fuel pump, Microsquirt and MAP sensor, and presumably the regulator / rectifier mounted vertically.
What's the box mounted underneath the top plate?
 

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Ah, okay. Looks good.

Just a few things I noticed:
You might want to fuse the power the key and temperature switch either separately or off the protected side of the main fuse.
What's the PWM 'module' to the cooling fan for? I believe you could control the fan from the MS using the MSExtra firmware and either the Accel or Warm-up LED outputs.
Why batch fire the injectors instead of alternating / sequential? If you're not sure you want that, I would still suggest wiring them separately because you can change the setting in TunerStudio.
 

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Discussion Starter · #95 ·
PWM is a Pulse Width Modulator. I'm using it to regulate the power draw of the fan from ~6A/80W to 3A/36W for power management.

Batch-firing is easier. I'll re-wire for sequential when I get that hurdle.

Ah, okay. Looks good.

Just a few things I noticed:
You might want to fuse the power the key and temperature switch either separately or off the protected side of the main fuse.
What's the PWM 'module' to the cooling fan for? I believe you could control the fan from the MS using the MSExtra firmware and either the Accel or Warm-up LED outputs.
Why batch fire the injectors instead of alternating / sequential? If you're not sure you want that, I would still suggest wiring them separately because you can change the setting in TunerStudio.
 

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I know what PWM is, I just didn't understand why you had it. I thought maybe you were going to use coolant temp to control the fan speed, but didn't see any feedback to the PWM from the sensor.

And like I said, batch firing the injectors can be done in software. It might save you some work down the road if you wire it for that now instead of waiting until you decide to play with it. You have the option, as you probably know of physically firing the injectors simultaneously with them wired in parallel, and one squirt every revolution. You can also fire both injectors once per full cycle / every other revolution- allows longer injection time and slightly better accuracy but risks 'charge stealing' where one cylinder takes some air from the other.
 

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Boy do i feel like a tard.:homework::dontknow:

I m going back to the beginning and read again !!
 

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Discussion Starter · #98 · (Edited)
Ha! I bet everyone thought this project was quietly swept under the rug. Well I finally finished the wiring diagram and actually assembled everything. Not realizing Microsquirt could have done it, I put an Arduino into the mix to handle cooling fan control (think of it as using a microcontroller instead of a temperature switch... not sure if this is the greatest idea). I've removed the stock temperature gauge, and instead the Arduino will flash an LED on the gauge cluster to warn the operator of overheating.



Here's the rat's nest of assembled hardware. So far everything checks out, pending sensor calibration, and is hooked up for software-in-the-loop simulations using Labview. I'll post better pictures once the wires have been cleaned up.




Here's a screen shot of the desktop. Labview is simulating a 6-1 trigger wheel at 500rpm. The eventual goal is to simulate two cam sensors timed 80° apart to see how Microsquirt handles it. In a nutshell, I'm too lazy to spend time in the garage, so I'm doing it at my desk instead!

 

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Better to test at the desk first anyway, saves time and money and reduces real world testing time by a heap.
 

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keep slogging forward, we're all hanging with you...

Jerry
 
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