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'84 CX650E that is evolving into a GL500
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Discussion Starter · #221 ·
As I expected after the first short ride yesterday, the level in the tank was just barely below the line this morning from air in the line from the rad neck purging. Today was the Polar Bear Ride so it got as warmed up as it is likely to get for the next while. Twice. When we stopped to eat the level was about 1/4" above the line. I didn't notice what it was when we left there but it was about 1/4" above the line again when we returned home. After sitting in the garage (about 7c) for a couple of hours it has returned to just about where it was in the pic above but the engine didn't feel terribly cold so I expect it will drop again by tomorrow.

I figure that's well within the normal range of levels so unless something changes drastically I think I'll say it is working as I had hoped.

BTW: Since the coolant they sell these days is so pale I add a few drops of blue food colouring when I mix it with water to make it easier to check the level. I think the original tanks become more opaque with age because 10 years ago I could easily see the level in this one with only the coolant dye they put in at the factory. My mixture is darker than that but I couldn't see the level without putting a flashlight behind the tank the last time I filled it so it ended up at about at the upper line; It was still that full when I removed the tank but you wouldn't know by looking at the pic, would you?
I drained the old tank into my big measuring cup and since it looked clean I poured the same coolant back into the new tank where it is plainly visible.

Also, the long nut that supports the tank (one of the ones that used to support the old tank) looks a lot more rusty in the pic than in real life but the next time I dip a brush into the rust paint it won't look as bad.
Oh, and in case anyone was wondering the wire is that runs above the tank and into the bottom of the fairing is the radio antenna cable and the trailer wire (also from the fairing) attached to the sidecar strut with red zip ties is for the lights &c at the front of the sidecar (there's another trailer wire at the rear for those lights).
 

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'84 CX650E that is evolving into a GL500
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Discussion Starter · #222 ·
Has it really been that long since I posted here? I guess it's time for an update...

I only drove it about 1000Km in the last year so there isn't a lot of incentive to get to any of the mods on the list this year but there is always some sprucing up to be done. The "big" job this year was supposed to be replacing the headers with the ones from the 500. The "old" ones were brand new in 2016 but they are aftermarket single wall and the chrome looked worse after one winter than the originals did after I'd been using them for 5 years (& those were 23 years old and not exactly pristine when I got them) and the rust was so thick I half expected one of them would start leaking.
That led to the dangerous situation of making me think about how to protect them, which led me to start this thread Questions: Header temperature? Is there a suitable...

I went over them with the wire wheel angle grinder to see just how bad they were and I should get at least one more year out of it so the job changed to cleaning them up for paint.
After wire wheeling and as removed from bike.
202411


I decided to treat them with POR15 Metal Prep and brush on a coat of Tremclad High Heat, since I had both on hand. After working the Metal Prep into them well I hung them up to dry while I did other stuff for a couple of days. Metal Prep (& most other phosphoric acid treatments) leaves a powdery white residue that I was pretty sure wouldn't promote paint adhesion. Metal Prep says nothing about it but I did find instructions for Ospho (another Phosphoric Acid based treatment) that said to wipe the residue off with mineral spirits before painting and I found a discussion on a forum where it was recommended to wipe with lacquer thinner after the mineral spirits, which makes a lot of sense to me as I like to wipe with thinners to degrease before painting anyway.
The one on the right is as treated, on the left ready for paint
202412


I painted them on Monday. The can I have is a few years old and even though I stirred it thoroughly it has dried to a satin finish instead of the matte that it is supposed to. Satin will shed dirt better so I'll be very happy if it works like this but I won't be surprised if it burns off either.

In the meantime I did the anual cleanup of the caliper (remove pads, pump pistons most of the way out, clean with contact cleaner and Scotchbrite, apply a thin layer of Silicone grease, work the pistons in & out until they move freely, re-assemble). While I was sitting by the front wheel working on that the condition of the nose of the sidecar started bothering me. Between the spider cracks in the gel coat (some of which have been painted over more than once) and the chips and missing flakes it looked more like a boxer's nose (& not a good boxer at that). "No prob" I thought "lift anything loose, add a bit of spot filler and when I brush on another coat it will look OK."
Right.
When I started working on it I found a lot more blemishes than I thought there were.
202413


Sand, add more filler, repeat and after a while remind myself that it is the winter machine and I'm going to brush the paint so it is probably good enough (at very least better than it was). And of course one of the filled areas absorbed the paint so I had to touch that up, which means I'll need to sand & rub it a bit so I'm waiting for the paint to harden for a week or so before that....
 

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Discussion Starter · #223 ·
I forgot to mention: As spring arrived Eccles started leaving little green puddles under the overflow hose. Only a few drops at a time. It turns out that the coolant level had increased slightly as the weather warmed up and the level in the tank was at the top of the upper line. I figured it was splash because the tank was long & narrow and the overflow hose is near the end so I removed about 1/4" of the coolant from it and it stopped happening.

Here is my "fantastic" bodywork (I can do much better when motivated but it is the winter beater after all). You can almost see the brush marks in the pic but they are more visible in person. But that's OK - for the winter machine I go by the "10/40 rule" - if it looks OK from 10M away or going past at 40 Km/h it is good enough ;-)
202567


The exhaust looked pretty good (this after a couple of heat cycles)
202568


Until I ran it while adjusting the carbs and then went for a 10 Km ride
202569


Oh well, maybe it will at least protect the parts that don't get as hot and maybe the phosphoric treatment will help....
 

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Discussion Starter · #226 ·
With 2 bikes I don't have an off season.
I seldom mention my other bike in this thread but in the summer I drive "Mr.H", my '83 GL1100 with modified Dnepr sidecar so when I go out this afternoon I will be on this
202606
 

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Discussion Starter · #228 ·
When I put Eccles into storage I planned to just change the oil &c and start riding it about now but as often happens my plans changed over the summer. A forum member offered me a load of mostly GL500 parts; I wanted a few as spares for Eccles but had to take the whole load so I combined what I didn't want with a bunch of stuff I already had and have been trying to sell off in my Cheap Parts thread

Among the stuff I kept was a nicer SilverWing seat than the one I've been using and an aftermarket trunk that I like enough more than the SilverWing one I've been using since 2011 to make me want to switch. I also got the idea for another electrical project and acquired the parts needed over the summer.

I moved Eccles back to the garage last week so it's about time I posted some pics. I've been working on these 3 projects at the same time because they affect each other but I'll describe them separately to make it easier to understand.

The first thing was to try the seat and decide what changes it would require.
Eccles started out as the original seat from my GL500 but a couple of years later I decided I didn't like the kick up at the back so I carved that off and stitched up a new cover for it and it has looked like this since
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The new seat will look something like this when I'm done
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I didn't go into detail about how the old seat was mounted in the early part of this thread but it wasn't a simple bolt on & go; I've mentioned before that the GL500/650 and CX650E frames (and the CX500E too, I imagine) are more or less the same except for some mounting points for things like the footpegs, side covers, seat &c. I always felt a bit cramped on the GL500 so I was happy that using the mounting points for the E with a GL seat resulted in it being higher up and farther back but it also meant that the seat pan didn't sit on the frame like it did originally so I needed to support the front of the seat and (I thought) to extend the seat's tab and lower it so it would engage with the back of the tank.

I also never mentioned that the old seat was originally attached with M8 allen head screws and aluminum spacers I made from something I had on hand and that I had bored the holes in the seat to suit them but when the threads rusted I changed to hex head stainless screws. SS and aluminum is never a great combination on salted roads and the spacers were getting ratty so I decided it was time to come up with something simpler. After searching high & low for something that was a better fit for the holes in the seat (probably why I used the aluminum ones in the first place) it occurred to me that the M8 stainless nuts I have would almost fit so I used the "vertical lathe" (drill press & file) to take just enough of the points off that they fit into the holes nicely, then smoothed them a bit and installed them on the bolts with washers sandwiched between the nut and the bolt head so the nut "spacers" can come out with the bolts.

This is the support I added (purple arrow), a piece of 1" x 1/8" steel bar supported & attached to the frame by a couple of 1 1/8" u-bolt muffler brackets and with a rubber block zip tied on top (there's a hole through the block for the tie) which the extended tab sat on.
204184


This pic of the bottom of the old seat shows the extended tab I attached to it (purple arrow is approx. where it sat on the block); The steel part was intended to make the plastic stiffer and the bolts near the front go through spacers to the original tab. I quickly learned that if I leaned on the back of the seat the tab would pop out from under the tank but it didn't move while I was sitting on it so I stopped putting it under the tank (it was like that for 14 years so I guess it is OK). Looks like I'd have to replace the staples soon if I wasn't replacing the seat.
204183


I always felt the seat would be supported better if the recess in the pan (red arrow above) sat on the block but that would have been right above the fusebox. But a couple of years ago I moved the fusebox into the space where the original battery lived so I figured changing that while changing seats would be a good time to change that too (red arrow below). This requires a longer piece of bar and the old one had bowed over the years so I used a bit thicker one this time and I also changed to a piece of oak (finished with boiled linseed oil) for the block and attached it with screws from below. I made it long enough that it's ends are over the frame for a bit more strength (if it doesn't last I can easily replace it).
204185


That's all the time I have for now so the pics of the trunk project will have to wait until later.
 

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Discussion Starter · #229 ·
The "new" KG Engineering trunk (left) and the old SilverWing tall trunk (right). It looks like the new one is a lot wider and the old one a lot taller but in fact, the useful inside dimensions are (W x H x L) old: 12" x 11" x 15", new 14" x 10" x 15" so they are about the same volume.
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So why does the old one look so much taller? Well, the old one was designed to mount in place of the SilverWing's rear seat so the bottom is shaped to fit over the frame & fender, accommodate the quick release hardware and fit with the seat, which means that it is several inches lower at the edges than in the middle where anything in it sits.
All of that is great if you are using it on a SilverWing but being a CX650E, Eccles didn't have the attachment points (not to mention that the front seat is higher and rearward of where it would be on a SW so I had made a bracket for the tab at the front to engage with (bolted onto the crossmember with the same bolts that fasten the inner & outer fenders) and supported the rear with one piece of angle where the original toolbox attached to the frame and another where the original hardware attached to the trunk, then bolted together so it was level.
And why change if they both hold the same volume? Have a look at the floor of the old trunk. In addition to a rainsuit, spare gloves and any cargo, I keep the bike's paperwork and a couple of other small items in there and the small stuff always migrated down the edges
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And the floor of the new one, nice & flat. I think this will be much more useful for me.
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The first thing I did (aside from removing the chrome rails from it) was to test whether acetone would melt it by dribbling a but into one of the cracks. When that worked I welded up the rest of the small cracks with acetone, then got out my can of acetone & ABS slurry to patch all of the existing holes (none of them were where I would need them); After reaming out the holes and sanding around them to make sure of clean plastic to bond to I put pieces of packing tape over them on the inside and filled them with slurry from the outside. After it hardened for a couple of hours I removed the tape so it could cure from both sides and 2 days later I sanded the outside to level them and get rid of blemishes in the old paint. (I did that and drilled all the new holes before I took the pics above - you can see the black circles where the old holes were)

The whole time I had the SW trunk the original Honda lock would fill with dirt and become hard to open during winter a rare earth magnet stuck over the opening reduced the interval but I still had to flush it with contact cleaner and re-lube it with graphite was required at least once per month. When I changed from the low SW trunk lid to the tall one I used the same lower lock that I had keyed to match the rest of the bike but I didn't have a key for the upper lid's lock and couldn't get it apart to re-key it so I changed to a cam lock I had and got a weatherproof cover suitable for cam locks. I basically stopped opening lower lid because stuff didn't fall out if I used the upper one and when I tried to open the lower lock in the spring I couldn't get the key to go in and it wouldn't flush out so I removed it and added a plate inside (bolted to the holes for the lock) to hold the lower lid closed. In the meantime, protected by the weatherproof cap, the cam lock stayed nice & clean.
The new trunk came with a rusty hardware store hasp lock and no key. It would have been easy to replace it with a new hardware store hasp lock but I knew it would fill with dirt like the Honda lock and that wasn't a problem with the cam lock and cap so I spent a couple of hours digging around to see if I had anything suitable for the cam to engage with before giving up and spending less time making the bracket near the middle of this pic. It bolts to the trunk's lid and I modified a cam to engage with a bolt screwed into it (I included an unmodified one for comparison)
204255


The old trunk had been on since 2011 and during that time I couldn't get at the frame under it to touch it up so when I removed it the last 10" of the frame looked pretty bad (I'll be able to get under the new one a bit better). Here it is after wire brushing most of the rust off and brushing on a coat of "Rust Killer" zinc bearing primer (as I type this the black RustCoat paint on those parts of the frame and on the brackets has been curing for 2 days). Most of you are familiar with what the back end of GL500/650 frames look like and you can see some of the differences between those and an E frame in this pic (you can also see the open end of the right frame tube, which I added a thick plug of silicone to to keep water out).
It doesn't look "chopped" does it? 50 bonus points to the first one that spots what I have removed from it ;-)
204256
 

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Discussion Starter · #230 ·
Nobody knows what's missing from that frame? I guess I did a good job then.....

The tail light and license plate were attached to a bracket bolted to the old trunk and when I removed it I could see how rusty the piece that attached the plate to the bracket was (upper right in pic). And all of the nuts, bolts & washers. I'd already added a piece of plastic to help support the plate (I learned the hard way that using stainless hardware with aluminum license plate is a bad idea but I don't want to spend $60 for a new plate) so while I was waiting for the paint to dry I disassembled it, cleaned everything up and made a new piece to attach the plate from plastic, then put it all back together with new hardware (because of the aluminum bracket I used zinc plated fasteners for this).
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The brackets I made for the new trunk (bent from 1" x 1/8" steel). There is also a piece of similar material laying on top of the frame's crossmember as a spacer so I can bolt through the inner & outer fenders, crossmember and trunk with the nuts inside the trunk (the same 5/16" stainless bolts I used there before were exactly the right length so that the ends are flush with the elastic stop nuts). I used 5/16 stainless bolts and ES nuts everywhere in this assembly.
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The trunk and seat installed (the sharp eyed among you may get a hint about the electrical project from this view)
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I just sprayed it with Rubberized Rockerguard. I've been touching up the back of the sidecar with Rockerguard the last few years without painting the blue over it (I want to re-paint the whole thing eventually so I'm not doing anything fancy in the meantime) so this will at least match that.
204357


I'll take better pics in a few days when it is outside and I can stand farther away from it. In the meantime I'm trying to figure out how to take some video for the next instalment.......
 

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Discussion Starter · #231 ·
A few months ago someone on the forum mentioned replacing his turn signals with "flowing" (sequential) ones. The rubber "stalks" on the signals I have on my GoldWing have been chalking for a few years and I've been intending to replace them so I decided to look on eBay and found these (search eBay for flowing turn signal with Price + shipping lowers first and you'll find various types for under $10 per pair)
204438

They are nice & bright and work as advertised but when I hooked one of them up to the bike to try it the flasher turned the power off before the cycle finished so it never fully lit. Hmmm... They would work better with out the flasher.... But if I did that I'd need them on both ends and there is nowhere on the back of Mr.H to mount something like that...
(the round red lights are the signals)
204439


Eccles, on the other hand, has ordinary motorcycle signals on stalks (with LED panels in them) so they would work on the rear of it but there is nowhere to mount them on the front. So back to eBay and I found these. I wasn't sure how bright they'd be and they were cheap enough so I bought 4 so I can use 2 for each signal. And another pair of the first type.
BTW: I the videos of the signals being demonstrated are not mine and I did not buy them from the links with the videos.

By the time they all arrived I was deep in the R/C mower project and when that was done it was time to get Eccles ready to use so Eccles got the new signals first (Mr.H will wait until spring to get them) and while I was waiting for paint to dry I got to work. Some of you may remember the pic I posted a few years ago of the LED panels in the fairing signal; Changing to the flowing strips in that was pretty easy, just remove the old panels, stick the new strips on and solder the wires. The one on the sidecar was about the same except that the LED panel was attached to the metal plate that the bulb socket had been originally fastened to and it was pretty rusty. I started cleaning it up (it was a lot worse than in the pic) but got thinking: The lens has been fastened directly to the sidecar body since I converted it to LEDs (2008 IIRC) and the edges of the lens contact the gasket outside of it anyway so I don't really needed the metal plate. This would a good time to replace it with something that won't rust so I dug around and came up with a cover from a project box I had used without the cover.
204440


I added a #6 stainless bolt & nut to the sidecar body for each mounting point and then a second nut to each to fasten the plate to them so it will be easier if I ever need to take it apart again
204442


The rear signals were easy. The one on the sidecar is in the hole from the old one. I wanted to get rid of the turn signal bracket bolted to the bike's frame so the one on the bike is on a bracket that hangs below the new trunk where it sticks out about the same distance as the old one did.
204443


I removed the flasher and connected the black wire and the white/green wire together, then connected the battery from the riding mower with clip leads for testing.
This is not great video but you can at least tell that other road users should have no doubt about my intentions.
BTW: The strips in the sidecar signal look the same every time I turn them on; The ones in the fairing signal sometimes look like the ones on the sidecar but more often than not they appear to flicker instead. I'm not sure why (I suspect it may be because the resistance in the wiring to the fairing is reducing the voltage and hope they will flow normally when the engine is running and the voltage increases) but I think it should still be obvious that it is a turn signal.
Also, there is a slight variation in cycle time between the strips and after they have been on a while they get out of synch so I tacked a bit on the end showing what that looks like.

The only thing I don't like about them is that the turn signal LEDs in the Danmoto 180 instrument panel no longer flash to remind me to turn the signals off but I have an idea I'll pursue if that becomes a problem.

That's all for now. It's warm out again today so I want to do some work in the garden and maybe deal with the last thing to make Eccles ready, a sticking back brake lever (pump grease in, work lever until it moves freely).
 

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Discussion Starter · #232 ·
It turns out that the battery I was using for testing needed to be charged. I've put Mr.H into storage and moved the U1 battery to Eccles and the fairing signal works like the one on the sidecar.

And Eccles fired up and ran as well as if I had driven it the day before ;-)
 

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Discussion Starter · #233 ·
After riding it a couple of times I decided the front end of the seat needed to be a bit higher so I screwed a strip of plastic about 1/4" thick onto the top of the block of wood that the seat sits on and it feels a lot better. I also decided that the plastic piece I made to fill the opening under the seat 14 years ago and cut to fit around the seat support in it's old location left the space under the seat too open with the support moved back so far so I made a new one that filled the space much better.

And then I waited for a day I could take it outside when the sun was trying to shine and take the official fall portraits
204766


204768


BTW: I sprayed RustCheck on the places that usually get the most damage from salt & grit sprayed up from the road right before I took these pics
 

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Discussion Starter · #234 ·
Eccles survived another winter in good pretty shape so not much work will be needed before it moves to the shed for the rest of the summer. I had to fix the little white marker light on the sidecar (one of the too-thin wires broke - now reinforced with heat shrink) and when I checked to make sure everything else was working afterward I discovered that the sidecar's HID headlight wasn't.
There was power where the ballast plugged in and I was about to start figuring out whether the problem was the ballast or the bulb when I remembered some H3 type LED headlight "bulbs" I bought to try in the sidecar headlights before I retired and almost entirely stopped driving after dark (I don't think I even turned Eccles' sidecar headlight on while driving last winter). So instead of getting the HID to work I removed the HID parts and opened up the hole in the light's reflector a bit (3 of the 4 LED bulbs I have wouldn't go through the hole that was originally made for a halogen H3), tested them in the garage with the lights off and chose one that might not be quite as bright as the HID was but only draws 6W.
Some of the mirroring flaked off around where the bulb attaches and an area on the reflector was dull (it was like that before but it was in the shadow of the shield that was required to turn the light from a spotlight to a low beam) so I painted the flat area the bulb mounts to and a wedge shaped area that covers the dull part below the bulb with flat black. When I shone the completed assembly on the garage door to test it this resulted in a beam pattern that has the top side missing, which is exactly what a low beam requires.
208627


And while I was playing with the wires in there I got thinking about what some of them were for; Every wire had a purpose when installed but over the years since I last tidied up the wiring things have evolved and some of them no longer match the drawing Matt made for the fairing's wiring (last revised in 2010) so I decided it is time to tidy things up again and update my drawing and add the wiring in both ends of the sidecar to it. And if I can remember where I put the new switch panel for the fairing maybe I'll replace that while I'm at it too, but I've searched everywhere I can think I might have put it (I'll probably stumble across it the day after I finish)....
 

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Discussion Starter · #235 · (Edited)
I know I put the unmolested fairing panel and cover somewhere they would be safe until I decided to install them but you can only search for something for so long so I gave up and made a new panel. A decade ago I had 6 switches in the panel but the HID headlights eliminated the need for fog lights when driving in blowing snow, the new (in 2013) handlebar switches eliminated the need for another 2 and thanks to the milder winters and better designed gear I haven't used the plug & switch for the electric anti-fog heated helmet shield in a loooong time so the new panel only has holes for 3 switches and the LED indicators to go with them.
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The new panel is a mm thinner than the original and flexed more than I'd like so I added ribs to stiffen it.
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Just about when I had the panel made Lee gave me the prototypes for the LED holders.
I've updated the drawing of the circuit I use for LED indicators on motorcycles and added what the parts actually look like.
Font Parallel Rectangle Diagram Circle


Note: This image above is the corrected version. As Randall pointed (post #237) out the halves of the drawing as originally posted didn't match. The explanation I gave (post #238) is probably more than adequate but when I looked at again it bothered me so I corrected it.
(SCB 16 Sept. 21)

Font Triangle Parallel Slope Circle


The idea of the holders is that I will be able to build up the LED circuit, insert that fragile assembly into the holder, add a zip tie to secure the wires and install that as a more robust unit where I am concerned that the components could be easily damaged (like when I am rummaging around inside the fairing). Here are the ones I prepared for Eccles' fairing
208906
 

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Discussion Starter · #236 ·
I had originally intended to mount the flashing green LEDs just below the windshield but that could cause glare on the inside of the windshield at night in some conditions. I wanted them where they will be easily noticeable but not shining directly in my eyes as well so I put them in the plates that blank off the vents. The prototype LED holders snapped firmly into 8mm holes (I did glue them just in case) but a bit too short to come flush with the 3mm panels, resulting in a recess around them that I didn't like so I decided to add a bit of shiny trim - M4 stainless washers :cool: (Lee figured out how to fix that and printed me a few for future projects that are correct a few days later)
The voltmeter was always hard to read if the sun was shining on it so I moved it to one of those panels too (note the 35mm film can lid that was the perfect size to plug the meter's old hole).
I was getting tired of looking at the rust on the bracket for the instrument panel and the keyswitch so while things were apart I pulled that apart and gave it a coat of cold galvanizing primer and then painted it with the Hammered Black (it was Stainless Steel appliance paint before).
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So in January of 2012 I gave Matt this
Rectangle Schematic Font Slope Parallel


And a few days later this arrived in my email
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I revised it later that year but since then I've just scribbled the changes on a print of that so it was about time I did something about that. It made sense to add the wiring in the sidecar while I was at it so I started by enlarging the canvas to make room for that without making the fairing part smaller. As usual when I'm working on graphics I got carried away with details like learning that there is actually a special symbol for flashing LEDs, making up symbols for the LED circuits and for light assemblies with arrays of LEDs that I'll be able to use if I ever work on another drawing like this and stuff like that and ended up probably spending more time on the drawing than it would have taken to rewire it all (except I'd have needed a drawing to do that :rolleyes:).
Here's a forum sized version (the original is much larger)
208911


Those waiting patiently for me to get around to working on the improved & corrected copies of the CX wiring drawings can consider this practice...
 

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Discussion Starter · #238 ·
It doesn't matter which order circuit elements in series are in because the same current passes through them.
In this circuit the resistor's job is to limit the current through the LED.
The reverse biased diode is there to prevent damage to the LED by reverse voltage spikes. Yes, I know they shouldn't exist in a bike's electrical system and in theory you could omit it; A couple of the LEDs I removed from the panel survived without the diode for a long time but I also had LEDs from the same batch that failed in short order as did their replacements but when I installed new ones with the diode they survived for many years.
I think the spikes may be related to the voltage regulator but I can't remember why I came to that conclusion.
Diodes are less than $5 per 100 on eBay and I had them on hand to protect LEDs in model trains - you reverse the direction by reversing the polarity) so now I just add one every time.

BTW: I used 6.2KΩ (= 1.9 mA) for the flashing green LEDs and they are pretty bright but if your eyes are good you'll see from the fairing & sidecar drawing that the LEDs I used in the panel needed a bit more current.
 

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I am saving money to buy a sidecar for the Interceptor in the fall. The sub frame for the GL500 is just too out of my skill set. I'll do some work on the GL500 and then put her up for sale.
 

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Discussion Starter · #240 ·
BTW: Here's the video of Mr.H's lighting, including the new sequential signals. It is basically the same as Eccles has except for stalk type signals on the front and strips in lenses on the rear (the opposite of Eccles). The new camera takes much better video than the old one.
 
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