Honda CX 500 Forum banner
1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
837 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Since purchasing the bike in July, we've not had a cold day this summer...until this weekend. I went out for a quick ride between rain storms and given the temp was about 15 - 17 C I thought I'd try and see how low I could get the temp guage to go. So, after a bit of experimentation I found that running in 5th gear at about 70KMH on a level road (real easy on the engine) the temp needle got down to 2 - 3 needle widths in the "thin" line of the temp guage below the junction of the "thick" line. So, would this rather unscientific method indicate that at this point/temparature is when the thermostat actually opens?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,563 Posts
Since purchasing the bike in July, we've not had a cold day this summer...until this weekend. I went out for a quick ride between rain storms and given the temp was about 15 - 17 C I thought I'd try and see how low I could get the temp guage to go. So, after a bit of experimentation I found that running in 5th gear at about 70KMH on a level road (real easy on the engine) the temp needle got down to 2 - 3 needle widths in the "thin" line of the temp guage below the junction of the "thick" line. So, would this rather unscientific method indicate that at this point/temparature is when the thermostat actually opens?
im pretty sure the thermostat is not just open or closed,it actually acts like a moving valve opening and closing to different degrees acording to the engine temperature
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,871 Posts
The best way to test your thermostat is to suspend it in a pot of water and heat the water, watch a thermometer and the thermostat and note the temp it starts opening and the temp it's fully open.  Bandit is correct, if you do the this test you'll see the thermo. will gradually open up, not just "open" or "closed" but a range of opened.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,423 Posts
Bandit is right.Thermostats are not just open or closed.They vary the amount of opening depending on the needs of the engine.

The thermostats on out bikes(At least the 500s) are supposed to be fully open at 82 Deg C/180 Deg F this means the engine temps will vary from around 75+ Deg C to 85 Deg C under most conditions.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,871 Posts
You could run it without, but it's probably not the best idea.  You don't want it to stay too cool.  
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,104 Posts
You could always take it out and see but

that would probably be a bit like the Schrödinger's cat experiment




It sounds quite normal to me Johnny, mine does it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
242 Posts
never, ever run a water-cooled engine without a thermostat. With a very few exceptions you will kill it, quickly. This is particularly true for most CXs, because the fan runs all the time, so they're generally over-cooled to begin with. More cooling is not what a CX usually needs.



Can somebody find the link to the German guy's website where he rode his CX around with a datalogger on it and covered up the whole radiator in near-freezing temperatures? Result: the bike was happier. As an experiment, I did something similar the winter before last when we had a good late riding season and I had a half-hour ride to work. I kept covering up more and more of the radiator grill with packing tape. The engine never overheated, but it did warm up a lot faster. When ambient temps went above 70 F in the afternoon I took all the tape back off.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
15,414 Posts
If you make the effort to take it out and check it you should just replace it.



Also don't run a water cooled engine without one. It may have worked on grandpa's truck but don't do it to a motorcycle.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
11,467 Posts
never, ever run a water-cooled engine without a thermostat. With a very few exceptions you will kill it, quickly. This is particularly true for most CXs, because the fan runs all the time, so they're generally over-cooled to begin with. More cooling is not what a CX usually needs.



Can somebody find the link to the German guy's website where he rode his CX around with a datalogger on it and covered up the whole radiator in near-freezing temperatures? Result: the bike was happier. As an experiment, I did something similar the winter before last when we had a good late riding season and I had a half-hour ride to work. I kept covering up more and more of the radiator grill with packing tape. The engine never overheated, but it did warm up a lot faster. When ambient temps went above 70 F in the afternoon I took all the tape back off.




If you make the effort to take it out and check it you should just replace it.



Also don't run a water cooled engine without one. It may have worked on grandpa's truck but don't do it to a motorcycle.




YEP, never.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,601 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
458 Posts
Always run a thermostat, some engines can run hotter without one. The water/coolant runs so fast through the radiator, it doesn't have enough time to cool it. If it makes the engine run too cool, your oil will get sludgy, (look under your tappet covers for "deposits") like black dust or dirt.



Also, temp gauges, in general, only read about 15 to 20 degrees from one side to the other.

So, they dont read anything until 80 degrees and boil at 100. so anywhere in between is "normal". There are about 3 or 4 thermostats that fit, and after 30 years, you could have any thing in there. Some people change theirs to run hotter in winter, and swap it over in summer for a cooler one.



Quick check to see if thermostat is open, touch the chrome water pipe on the left side of engine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
242 Posts
Here you are:

CX500 water temperature



and from the same site something about oil pressure:

oil pressure
Yep, that's the one I was thinking of.



Nice, I'll have to find a .pdf translation site though as I'm quite unsure that "Fahrtwind" means what it sounds like.
Fahrt is 'travel' or 'motion' in German. Wind is what it sounds like. Fahrtwind, therefore, is airflow caused by the motion of the bike (not the cooling fan). It's the ambient air around the bike, which is why the line stays at a low temperature everywhere except during the hot soak period.



You can copy text into google translate and get a pretty good idea what is going on:

It is clearly to see that at these temperatures the

Thermostat was far from opening the large radiator circuit,

see the blue line. The previous engine cooling occurred mainly in small

Cooling circuit and through the wind.
This actually gets close to what I was talking about - the bike is vastly overcooled below comfortable room temperature. By the time you're down to freezing, it never gets close to warming up even if the thermostat is working perfectly. Blocking off the radiator is the only thing that helps. SSH is something like a bypass road or motorway, btw.



When he mentions the 'small cooling circuit' he means flow through the bypass hole in the thermostat. In other words, the bike is so overcooled near freezing that just water flow through the jiggle valve is enough to keep it from reaching operating temperature.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
835 Posts
Yep, that's the one I was thinking of.





Fahrt is 'travel' or 'motion' in German. Wind is what it sounds like. Fahrtwind, therefore, is airflow caused by the motion of the bike (not the cooling fan). It's the ambient air around the bike, which is why the line stays at a low temperature everywhere except during the hot soak period.



You can copy text into google translate and get a pretty good idea what is going on:



This actually gets close to what I was talking about - the bike is vastly overcooled below comfortable room temperature. By the time you're down to freezing, it never gets close to warming up even if the thermostat is working perfectly. Blocking off the radiator is the only thing that helps. SSH is something like a bypass road or motorway, btw.



When he mentions the 'small cooling circuit' he means flow through the bypass hole in the thermostat. In other words, the bike is so overcooled near freezing that just water flow through the jiggle valve is enough to keep it from reaching operating temperature.


These engines never cease to amaze me. That little by-pass is enough to keep the engine too cold in cold weather - who'd a thought. As for covering the radiator, I often do that with my car in the winter. Especially with only a short 5km drive to work. If I don't, it doesn't warm up the inside at all. Funny though, I never thought to do it for the bike.... didn't think of the engine - compared to my own comfort where it would be near pointless (thank god for grip warmers!)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
242 Posts
Yes, I do the same thing on my cars as well - got into the habit in Pennsylvania, and still do it here just to get faster warmup times. I generally block about 1/2 the radiator area on a car. On the bike, I ended up with about 90% coverage. I would probably need less if I switched to an electric fan.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
29 Posts
Jonny, I note that you have a CX650, which should have an electric fan which can maintain a very steady radiator temperature.

What no-one has actually spelled-out is that if you run the engine too cool, the oil will suffer as it does not get hot enough to lose all the water & acids that blow-by will have added to the sump.

The 'mayonnaise' that collects in the coolest parts like the rocker-box covers is an obvious indicator.

If you don't get this effect, you don't need to worry.

The whole point is to keep the oil at the correct working temperature, wherever this happens to be on the dial.

I would not give 10c for most of these temp gauges as they are the crudest possible, cheapest possible hot-wire instruments. The instrument itself is very prone to give misleading readings in extreme ambient conditions.

Your instrument does not even have the 7v regulator that most models use & which can be 'tweaked' to give the correct reading. Same for the fuel contents gauge.

The only way to calibrate yours is to remove the sender (if you can!), place in hot water with a thermometer then bend the pointer. Rocket science? Not quite.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Nice, I'll have to find a .pdf translation site though as I'm quite unsure that "Fahrtwind" means what it sounds like.


Sorry.

I couldn´t imagine, that my brain-fahrts in this article were going around the world.




Next Sorry for my bad use of this worldwide used english lanquage.

I like it more the french way




Grüße

WolFgang
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
11,467 Posts
Sorry.

I couldn´t imagine, that my brain-fahrts in this article were going around the world.




Next Sorry for my bad use of this worldwide used english lanquage.

I like it more the french way




Grüße

WolFgang






I think, ladies and gents, we have just witnessed the true effect of Kismet. Who woulda thunkit indeed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,278 Posts
Incidentally, I found this very old thread. (Instead of the .pdf-format her is the .doc-formatting.)
Actually it' s getting a hot summer.
But You can read most of the text with babblefish's help ........ in the wintertime.

Attention a loooonnng text is coming:

...and I will insert in some time the lost pictures Done

...and a last wish: I remark that I have a double account. I didn't remember this.
Dear Moderator Sirs: Please forgive me and close this "Fahrtwind" member account.
Thanks :)

Gruesse
WolFgang


Güllepumpe mit Messkoffer





Land vehicle Vehicle Motorcycle Motor vehicle Car



Hintergrund der Testfahrten:


Georgios aus Berlin berichtete mir vom Bau einer Kühler- und Motorabdeckung für den Winterbetrieb seiner Güllepumpe. Neugierig geworden, ob das denn ein Sinn oder ein Unsinn sei, entsann ich mich vorhandener Temperatur-Datenlogger. Diese Logger messen mit Sensoren die Temperaturen und speichern die Messwerte in zuvor eingestellten Zeitabständen. Die gespeicherten Daten wurden nach den Testfahrten ausgelesen und in Kurvendiagrammen dargestellt.


Gesagt, getan. Da ich selber eine Alltags-Güllepumpe mit Topcase fahre, bot sich dieses Gerät als fahrbarer Messkoffer an. Die Maschine hat lt. Tacho eine Kilometerleistung von knapp über 52.000 und ist Baujahr 1979 und fährt auch bei Wintertemperaturen, sofern es einen Winter jemals wieder gibt.




Die Einbaustellen der Temperatursensoren während der Testfahrten sind für:
Öltemperatur (im Ölsumpf): es wurde ein Sensor anstelle des Ölpeilstabes eingebaut;
Temperatur der Zylinderköpfe: in die vorhandene Bohrungen der beiden Zylinderköpfen, je ein Sensor. (Die Bohrungen dienen als eventueller Wasserablauf bei undichten oder porösen Zündkerzenabdeckkappen);
Kühlwasser im „kleinen“ Kreislauf:
Kühlwassertemperaturen: an beiden Metallrohren, die je rechts und links vom Zylinder kommen und zum Thermostatgehäuse führen, sowie:
Rücklauf vom Thermostatgehäuse zur Wasserpumpe.
Ansaugluft im Luftfiltereingang unter der Sitzbank;
Fahrtwindtemperatur vor dem Kühlergitter;
Kühlwasser im „Großen“ Kreislauf:
Kühlwassereinlauf (Schlauch) oben in den Kühler;
Kühlwasserablauf (Schlauch und Metallrohr) unten am Kühler, Richtung Wasserpumpe.



Alle Sensoren wurden mit 15 mm starken Neoprenmaterial und Alufolie gegen die Aussenlufttemperaturen isoliert, damit keine Messwertverfäschungen auftreten.



Auto part Vehicle Engine Motor vehicle Fuel line

Abb. 2 Motor mit montierten und isolierten Fühlern


Zur Erklärung der Kühlwasserführungen im Motor:
Wird der kalte Motor gestartet, fließt zunächst das Kühlwasser im „kleinen“ Kreislauf innerhalb des Motors, von der Wasserpumpe zu den Zylindern und Zylinderköpfen, von dort durch zwei Metallrohre (bei der Güllepumpe) zum Thermostatgehäuse . Der Rücklauf des jetzt erwärmten Wassers geht durch einen kleinen Gummischlauch vom Thermostatgehäuse zur Wasserpumpe.

Hat die Verbrennungstemperatur in den Zylindern und Köpfen das Kühlwasser auf über 82° Celsius erwärmt, öffnet sich langsam der Thermostat und gibt den Weg zum „großen“ Kühlwasserkreislauf frei:
Das Kühlwasser fließt oben aus dem Thermostatgehäuse durch den Verbindungsschlauch zum Kühlerdom, dann durch die Kühlerlamellen hindurch -wo es durch Fahrtwind und Ventilatorluft heruntergekühlt wird- in den unteren Kühlerschlauch und dem nachfolgende Metallrohr und wird somit der Wasserpumpe zu einem neuen großen Kreislauf durch den Motor zugeführt. Bei diesem Ur-CX-Güllepumpen-Typ ist der Kühler-Ventilator immer mitlaufend, also nicht durch einen Temperaturschalter gesteuert, sondern von der Nockenwelle angetrieben.



Zeitweise wurde -zur Messung der Eintrittstemperatur der angesaugten Luft in den Ansaugtrakt (im Luftfilter) vor dem Vergaser- ein Temperaturfühler montiert, und ein weiterer am Schutzgitter des Kühlers.
Die im Luftfilter gemessenen Werte entsprachen im großen und ganzen der, der Jahreszeit entsprechenden Aussenlufttemperatur; erst nach tüchtiger Durchwärmung des Motors mit allen seinen Körperflüssigkeiten stieg die Ansaugluft um etwa 10 Grad an; durch die Abstrahlung des erhitzten Motors, „sammelt“ sich Warmluft unter der Sitzbank, wo die Luftfilter-Ansaugöffnung sitzt.
Der Sensor vor dem Schutzgitter des Kühlers zeigte die Temperatur des Fahrtwindes an, also die zum Zeitpunkt der Testfahrten, leider wenig winterlichen, Außentemperaturen. Diese Fahrtwindtemperatur stieg nur bei Zigaretten-, Einkaufs- oder Tankpausen an, sie wurde dann zur „Standtemperatur“. Diese starke Temperaturerhöhung wird sich natürlich auch im sommerlichen Stau nach heißer Autobahnfahrt zeigen.
Diese beiden Lufttemperatur-Sensoren wurden bei späteren Testfahrten an anderer Stelle eingebaut: Am rechten Zylinderkopf und am Metallrohr des Kühlerrücklaufs.





Um den Test zu fahren, wurde eine für viele -“auch-im-Winter-Fahrer“- typische „Kurzstrecke“ (Streckenlänge ca. 50 Km) gewählt, die sie zur Freundin, zum Freund oder zur Arbeit zum Aufwärmen bringt. Beim Fahrtest wurden die Temperatur-Messintervalle der Datenlogger auf 10 Sekunden eingestellt.


Meist gefahrener Streckenverlauf:
Nach dem Start ging es elf Kilometer kleinste Landstraße, vorwiegend bergab, dann 15 Kilometer hin auf einer mit 100 Km/h geschwindigkeitsbegrenzten, flachen, dreispurigen Landstraße, dann in umgekehrter Richtung 15 km diese Schnellstraße wieder zurück. Die letzte Strecke der Rückfahrt fuhr ich die elf km auf o.g. kleinster Landstraße, aber jetzt bergauf.
Die von mir vorwiegend eingelegten Getriebegänge waren der Vierte und der Fünfte, je nach Streckenverlauf; der Drehzahlmesser bewegte sich zwischen 6.000 und 7.000 U/min, im Vierten bergauf an die 9.500 U/min. Damit es zu keinen Messwertverfälschungen kam, wurde es vermieden, im Windschatten anderer Fahrzeuge zu fahren.
Der Kühler war bei dieser ersten Testfahrt, deren Kurven im Diagramm in Abb.3 zu sehen sind, noch nicht abgedeckt.





Text Line Plot Diagram Slope





Abb. 3: Diagramm mit zunächst acht Sensoren im Einsatz (Kühler noch nicht abgedeckt)


Interpretation der Werte nach Fahrtbeginn mit kaltem Motor links im Diagramm (Abb. 3) im Bereich der KSH=Kleinstraße Hinfahrt:
Die dargestellten Kurven der Motorsäfte zeigten eine sehr schnelle Erwärmung des linken Zylinderkopfes (grüne Kurve) und des Motorenöls (rote Kurve), die Erwärmung des Kühlwasser-Rücklaufs vom Thermostat zur Wasserpumpe (blaue Kurve) hinkte etwas hinterher.
Nicht nur auf der Fahrstrecke SSH=Schnellstraße Hinfahrt zeigte sich, daß sich hier durch den Fahrtwind die Zylinderkopftemperatur nicht weiter erhöhte. Deutlich ist auch zu sehen, dass bei diesen Temperaturen der Thermostat weit davon entfernt war, den großen Kühlerkreislauf zu öffnen, siehe blaue Linie. Die bisherige Motorkühlung geschah vorwiegend im kleinen Kühlkreislauf und durch den Fahrtwind. Später mehr zu diesem „Phänomen“.
Sehr gut war während meiner Pause (Einkauf im Supermarkt) zu sehen, wie sich die Temperaturen des Öls (Absenkung fast 20 ° C) und des Zylinderkopfes (Absenkung 25° C) recht schnell und stark absenkten. Ganz im Gegensatz zu den Temperaturen des Kühlwassers, die sich kurzfristig erhöhten, dann aber langsam wieder absenkten. Dadurch, dass beim Stillstand des Motors die Wasserpumpe keinen Kühlsaft durch die Kanäle und Rohre pumpte und der Ventilator auch keine weitere Abkühlung brachte, bildeten sich offensichtlich „Hitze-Nester“.
Die gefahrenen Streckenabschnitte SSR und KSR für die Rückfahrt, zeigten erwartungsgemäß wieder das normale Ansteigen der Temperaturen von Motoröl und Zylinderkopf. Die braune Kurve der Kühlwassertemperatur vom Zylinder zum Thermostatgehäuse, die in der Pause von 45° auf 75° angestiegen war, sank innerhalb weniger Kilometer Fahrstrecke wieder auf den vorherigen Wert von ca. 42° C.
Nach Beendigung der Rückfahrt war wiederum das Ansteigen der Kühlwassertemperaturen festzustellen: Motoröl und die erhitzten Motor-Innereien heizen nach. Aber generell war es bemerkenswert, wie langsam der Motor sich abkühlt. Bei etwa 5 Grad Aussentemperaturen, hatte der Motor immer noch um die 35° bis 40° Grad Temperatur, und das nach über einer Stunde Abkühlzeit bei einer Aussentemperatur von ca. 6° Celsius.
Also mal schnell unter Zeitdruck zum Kumpel oder in die Werkstatt zu fahren um die Ventile einstellen zu lassen, ist nicht sinnvoll. Der Motor ist für die richtige Ventileinstellung nicht genügend abgekühlt; dann lieber nur die Vergaser und Zündung einstellen lassen.



Zu dem oben erwähnten „Phänomen“, daß sich der Thermostat nicht öffnete, ist folgendes zu bemerken:
Ich dachte zunächst an einen defekten Thermostaten. Dieser Thermostat wurde ausgebaut und mit einem sehr guten digitalen Temperaturmessgerät in einem Kochtopf mit Wasser gemessen. Wie die eingeprägte Markierung „82°“ auf dem Thermostat angab, öffnete er sich bei dieser Temperatur und erreichte bei ca. 92 bis 94 Grad seine volle Öffnung. Dieser Thermostat war demnach technisch in Ordnung. Die Ventilplatte war im Thermostatgehäuse auch freigängig und zum Öffnen bereit.
Was mich -auch durch das Betrachten der Temperaturverlaufskurven- stutzen ließ war, daß trotz geschlossenem Thermostaten doch erwärmtes Kühlwasser in den Leitungen des eigentlich geschlossenen großen Kühlkreislaufes gemessen wurde. Aber erklärbar durch eine 4,5 mm kleine Bohrung in der Ventilplatte des Thermostaten. Sie dient zur Entlüftung des kleinen Kühlkreislaufes bei Wechsel der Kühlflüssigkeit oder des gesamten Thermostaten. Diese kleine Bohrung ist mitunter durch eine Art kleines Metallventil -allerdings nicht wasserdicht abschließend- nur leicht geschlossen. Auch soll durch diese Bohrung die -sich bei Erwärmung ausdehnende- Kühlflüssigkeit zum großen Kühlkreislaufsystem ableiten.


Circle Wheel Metal


Abb. 4
Die Abbildung 4 zeigt die kleine Bohrung mit dem Ventilplättchen, oben in 12 Uhr-Stellung in der Ventilplatte.

Eine hier nicht in einem Diagramm dargestellte Testfahr
t, in der ich mich und den Motor mit hohen Drehzahlen (an die 9000 Umins) quälend, nur im vierten Gang fuhr, brachte den Themostaten auch nicht dazu, sich zu öffnen.





Fahrten jetzt mit abgedeckten Kühler:
Bei diesen Testfahrten wurde der Kühler mit einer Kunststoffplatte zu fast 95% abdeckt, um eine schnellere Erwärmung von Öl und Kühlwasser zu bewirken.


Text White Line Yellow Pattern



Abb. 5


Es wird in diesem Diagramm (Abb.5) deutlich, daß das Öl bei abgedeckten Kühler weitaus schneller eine akzeptable Betriebstemperatur erreichte, als mit nicht abgedeckten Kühler, trotz niedrigerer Aussentemperaturen. Hier sind nur die Messwerte der Öltemperatur dargestellt, die auf der ersten Strecke: Kleinstraße mit „kaltem Motor“, gemessen wurden.

Abb.6:
Text White Diagram Blue Line


Der Unterschied des Fahrens bei einer weiteren Testfahrt mit und ohne Kühlerabdeckung (Abb. 6) zeigte sich ganz deutlich: Die Strecke KSH und SSH wurden mit Abdeckung gefahren. In der Pause wurde die Abdeckung abgebaut. Bei der anschließenden Rückfahrt auf der Schnellstraße (SSR und KSR) ohne Kühlerabdeckung gingen die Temperaturen in den Thermostatrohren und den
Kühlwasserschläuchen und Rohren deutlich um über 20° C nach unten, obwohl der Thermostat immer noch nicht geöffnet hatte. Also brachte die Abdeckung nachweisbar doch etwas für die schnellere Erwärmung der Motorsäfte.


Abb. 6 Fahrt mit abgedeckten Kühler




Eine Merkwürdigkeit zeigte sich aber bereits hier im Diagramm (Abb. 6):
Der offensichtliche Unterschied der Temperaturen in den beiden Metallrohren vom linken und rechten Zylinderkopf, die das Kühlwasser von den Zylindern zum Thermostatgehäuse leiten, betrug teilweise bis zu 25°C.
Spätere Testfahrten, bei denen dann an jedem Zylinderkopf je ein Sensor montiert wurde, bestätigten auch dort diesen auffälligen Temperaturunterschied. Bisher konnte ich nur eine leichte Unregelmäßigkeit in der Unterdruck-Synchronisation der beiden Vergaser und bei der Färbung des Kerzenbildes feststellen. Die Zylinderköpfe der Güllepumpe sind in Fahrtrichtung leicht versetzt angebracht, die Vermutung, daß der rechte Zylinder eine bessere Fahrtwindkühlung erhält, kann ich fast ausschließen: soviel darf es nicht ausmachen. Der Hinweis eines Freundes, daß BMW-Boxer-Gespannfahrer des öfteren den zum Seitenwagen zeigenden Vergaser unterschiedlich Bedüsen, weil der rechte Zylinder zu heiß wird, ließ mich zunächst nachdenklich werden. Wie mag es erst mit der Temperatur des hinteren Zylinders bei den Harley-Motoren aussehen ?

Diesem merkwürdigen Temperaturverhalten der beiden Zylinder und Köpfe meiner Test-Güllepumpe werde ich nachgehen und voraussichtlich in einer späteren Ausgabe dieser Zeitschrift darüber berichten. Deutet sich hier eine umfassendere Reparatur an ?


Abspann und Zusammenfassung:
Wie aus den Diagrammen zu ersehen ist, bringt es wirklich etwas für den eiligen Winterfahrer auf Kurzstrecken, sich und den Kühler gut einzupacken. Die Kühlerabdeckung sollte aber nicht mehr als 60 – 65 % des Kühlers bedecken. Außerdem empfiehlt es sich, während der Fahrt immer ein Auge auf die Kühlwassertemperatur geworfen werden, damit keine Überhitzung des Motors auftritt. Die Güllepumpe ist bei niedrigen Temperaturen einfach eine unterkühlte Lady, die nur warm wird, wenn man ihr die Drehzahl-Sporen gibt.
Die Winterfahrer, die keine Abdeckung vor dem Kühlergitter montieren möchten, sollten mindestens die ersten Kilometer (8 bis 10 km, je nach Aussentemperatur) den Motor „soft“ und verhalten warm fahren, bevor sie etwas „herzhafter“ den Gasschieber öffnen. Ich bin der Ansicht, daß sich die Ergebnisse der Messfahrten auch auf den winterlichen Umgang mit luftgekühlten Zweirädern und auch PKW´s und übertragen lassen.
Wie oben kurz angemerkt, sollte eine Werkstatt oder der Freund, die mal so nebenbei und zwischendurch das Ventilspiel einstellen wollen, gemieden werden. Es dauert immer drei bis vier Stunden, bis ein gut durchwärmter, wassergekühlter Motor auf 30° bis 20° C abgekühlt ist. (Nach meinem Wissen und Erfahrung, werden Ventilspiele bei Raumtemperatur eingestellt.)


Ein „Standtest“ bei einer Leerlaufdrehzahl von 1200 U/min erbrachte, daß es unsinnig ist, den Motor im Stand warmlaufen zu lassen. Nach ca. 10 Minuten hatte das Öl gerade mal schlappe 32° C erreicht; die Zylinderköpfe gaben zwischen 58° und 63° C an. Das von den Zylinder kommende Kühlwasser war nur auf ca. 45° erwärmt. Erst nach 20 Minuten erreichten die Flüssigkeiten eine zum Wegfahren akzeptable Temperatur von ca. 60°C. Aber welcher Fahrer und seine Hausnachbaren wünschen sich eine 20-minütige Warmlaufphase, bis der Motor mal in die Getriebe-Gänge kommt. Da fliegen vorher schon Nachbars Geranientöpfe.


Verwendete Meßtechnik: Datenlogger und Temperaturfühler der australischen Firma Data Electronics Ltd.; Typ DT5TP; Größe der Datenspeicher 2.000 oder 16.000 Messwerte. Die altertümliche Software läuft nur mit einem sehr langsamen PC und das auch noch unter DOS. Das Herstellungsjahr der überprüften, aber noch sehr gut funktionsfähigen Sensoren ist 1993. Nicht ganz dem Alter der CX500 angemessen und nur 14 Jahre jünger, als die 79er Güllepumpe.


Die Erkenntnisse aus den, heuer ach so wenig winterlichen Messfahrten, lassen sich sich logischerweise auch auf sommerliche Fahrten übertragen, hierbei aber bitte ohne Kühlerabdeckung: Auch im Sommer das Mopped warmfahren, ist aber nicht so ausgiebig notwendig. Der Motor freut sich.


WolFgang
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Top