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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
As mentioned in my 79 CX500 restoration, I'm restoring an 84 CX650E also. Since I'm still waiting on tank decals for that one I've started on the Euro. This ones going to take some time due to never having built one before, and the fact it came to me as a basket case from Timothy D. I've been collecting parts for it over the last year, but I'm sure there will be stuff missing as I go along.
For now, I'm just getting the foundation parts done and trying to gather as much info on the bike as possible. I have a post on the Ausi CX site asking for more detailed info of the VIN # since it doesn't show up anywhere. I'm also having a hard time finding the correct steering head bearings as well as even finding a site that list all the parts by Honda numbers for an 84, or even the 83. But the search goes on.

OK, so here's how I got the bike. Originally I got it to rob the rims off it. But the more I looked at it, the more I was impressed with it. So the decision to restore it just grew on me and I started collecting some of the missing parts. Tim got it for parts I'm pretty sure, so that's why some things were missing. Last year I bought a bunch of stuff Super Dave had listed here. That in itself was a big chuck that helped a lot.

Not too pretty eh!


This is how the rest of the bike came to me. But Tim was good enough to give me all the parts he had for an E. That gave me a lot to choose from.


I've decided to paint this one instead of having it powder coated. So 11 days ago I started in on the frame and all the parts that needed sand blasting and set up a makeshift blasting booth.


All the smaller parts were bead blasted.


After sanding the frame down and smoothing out it's surfaces from the sand blasting, it and all the parts were set up in the paint booth, sealed with epoxy sealer and painted black.




With all that done I started in on all the plastic body panels. Most of them had already been sanded and painted with black lacquer years ago. So the best way to remove all that and the original paint was to glass bead them. I bought a new box of glass bead so it would do a faster job of removing the finish down to bare plastic. During the process I found that holding the blast gun to as much of a right angle to the surface removes the paint much faster than pointing it straight at the part. Removing all the paint allows me to see any cracks or stress fractures that had been hit by something in it's past. And let me tell you, a LOT of things showed up that I wouldn't have seen by just sanding down the old paint. I'll try to show that as I go along.

Here's one that showed up by holding the part up to a light. Without the light I didn't see it. The lines at the end of it are pencil marks so I knew how far to grind it out.


This is just some of the results from Glass beading the plastics. As you can see, under the black lacquer it was originally the pearl white paint theme.


Like I said, LOTs of damaged showed up after blasting. These are just a few of the bad areas that I already have ground out ready to repair with PlastiFix.
Headlight opening on the front fairing.




There was even a small section broken off inside that I needed to replace. I cut this piece off from an old broken GL650I fairing I had laying out back.


Here's that spot all repaired.


The top corner of the headlight opening repaired.


As I have done before, I forgot to take some of the pictures of the side covers and the rear seat cowling before I fixed them. But you'll get the idea of just how much needed to be fixed by the repaired pictures below.

Where the cowl bolts up on both sides were the worst of it. All the cracks were V'ed out and filled with PlastiFix on the inside and outside. I think I spent 2 days on just the seat cowl.


Other side.


And the inside.


You can see most of the spots that were repaired here by the darker colored spots. But know that all the repairs were shaped and sanded inside and out of each piece. That way when it's all painted you'll never know there had been anything repaired.


With all the repairs done I sanded all of them inside and out with 220 grit, and finished it off with 320. Then they were wiped down and hung in the booth to be primed with Feather Fill high build primer thinned with acetone. Since this plastic melts with acetone or lacquer thinner, the added acetone in the primer helps melt/bond the primer to the plastic. I've been doing it this way for years and have never had a failure.


Well, that's it for now. This is going to be a long process by the time I'm done. All the components for this bike still need to be rebuilt before things go together at all. Not to mention I still have to build the motor for it. The motor for this bike was dismantled when Tim and I built the motor for his Euro. So I'm starting with the bare block that has the matching # on it for this bike. Lot's of fun ahead. But it'll probably be slow in coming.

If you want to see the rest of the pictures, here's my photobucket link. There's a sub folder in it for the paint and body work too. I'll be adding more folders to it as I go along.

BTW, this is the VIN tag. If you can help find parts listings for the 84, or even any info links for it please let me know.


Larry
 

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The UK club has the E on their Partsfinder. If you aren't already a member they allow people overseas to join for free CX / GL MCC ? The CX-GL MCC (UK)

There are a few differences between the E engine (which came with my Eccles) and the GL engine (which has been in Eccles for a couple of years). The biggest is that the transmissions are different. I tried to install a GL transmission in the E but found that one of the E's gear stacks is longer. I ended up cobbling together something from parts of both that worked on the bench but when put it back in the frame and fired it up it wouldn't shift into 5th. Just this week I discovered that the gearshift spindles and arms are different. I do not know which type the CX650C has.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks Bob. I'll remember to look at the transmissions when I start building the motor. But I think all the motors we took apart are CX650 motors. Hopefully they are the same as the E transmission.
 

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Larry if I remember correctly, the steering bearings are the same as the ones for a CX or GL.....assuming you are going for tapered bearings
For all balls the number is 22-1011
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Kameron,
I got the email from AllBalls today with the measurements for the 22-1011 kit and that's the right one. I ordered them through my Honda dealer today. Hope they'll be here tomorrow.
 

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And for part numbers use the cmsnl.com site since they have a listing for the Euro
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Bob, I filled out the information they wanted and emailed it to the link they provided. I got back an automated email saying it was not a deliverable email address.
I've been using the CMSNL site for now and it's helping me find things missing as well as part #s I need to order.
 

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The GL has an M12 oil drain plug and the E has an M14

Edit: I forgot to mention that nobody would ever notice if you used the wrong oil pan & drain screw because they look exactly the same except for the thread size, even the heads of the screws are the same.
 

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Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
I ordered the 22-1011 bearing set and it should be in today. I did the order through my Honda dealer and got a better price than online, or, through Allballs.

While I'm waiting for the head bearings, I started cleaning up the front fork assemblies. Pulling them apart I vapor blasted the right body and used a red scuff pad to redo the original marks in the body. Then I very lightly polished it with the fine compound on the polishing machine so I didn't polish out the scuff lines. When that was done I cleaned up the forks tube. But, even after polishing it out, it's evident that someone in the past has sanded the chrome with fine sandpaper. Since this is going to be a full on restoration I can't leave this that way. IF there's anybody that has pulled a set of forks off a Euro to do a cafe upgrade and has a VERY nice straight set of fork tubes they would be willing to sell, I'd love to hear from you.

I've done some research and I THINK the CX650c fork tubes are the same, but can't find definitively that it's a for sure thing. I'm waiting to here back on that.

Before cleaning and reconditioning the body.


Blasted clean and scuffed with red scuff pad to duplicate the original finish. I did NOT over sand it and take out the casting roughness. I left it as is.


Lightly polished and ready to assemble.


If you look closely you'll see the sanding marks in the chrome. They won't polish out.


Now the challenge is to find a good set of tubes that aren't pitted or bent. JC has offered me an NOS left tube he has, but I'd like to find a new right side tube also. Good luck with that eh!
For now I'm going to assemble the forks leaving the oil and seals out and move on so I can mock up the bike and figure out what else I need to order. I can take the forks off later and replace the tubes when I get that resolved. There's lots to do, so I'm not going to let this stop me for now.
 

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CX650C, not the same fork. Different diameters, longer tubes for the leading edge forks (37mm Euro vs 39mm Custom).
Closest relative is the 500E, and after that the 500T turbo anti-dive at 37mm, but I don't know if the valving is the same, because the 500T is a much heavier bike.

If you send the forks to Forks By Frank, he can probably bang out a set (if he doesn't already have them available).
 

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Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
Thanks Tim, I have a couple leads going on used OEM tubes that I hope work out.

Not wanting to wait, I got the second fork cleaned up and dry fit without the oil/seals so I could mock up the bike and make a list of other things I'll need. This will give me a good idea of all the hardware and parts that need to be zinc plated too.

Cleaned up and polished ready to go, temporarily,


The Trac system was also taken apart and cleaned up too. But, I forgot to take a shot of it when it was done. All the O-rings were just fine in it. It was a lot simpler than I had anticipated.


Front end on so I could install the rear suspension. The front wheel still needs to be cleaned up, then I'll start in on the brake system. The parts list to order will grow from here on.




Well, that's it for now. Need to get things covered and cleaned up outside since were finally getting into the rainy season starting tomorrow.
 

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I was thinking about what you said about not removing the roughness on the forks while I was working on getting Eccles' engine ready for paint yesterday, specifically while I was sanding very deep file marks out of the water pipe elbows. How rough are the ones on yours? Mine were deep enough that I had to do something about them before even giving it a coat of engine enamel for protection from the elements.

Do you do your own zinc plating or send it out? I have been plating stuff this week while I worked on other stuff...
 

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Discussion Starter #15
The casting for those elbows shouldn't be rough. The fork lowers were sand cast from the looks of them, and had a coarse finish. The factory sanded down the most visible ares of them so they had a smoother finish with a bit of a sheen and fine belt marks before they clear coated them. I left the castings the way they were, apposed to the way I usually do when doing a show polishing job where I sand EVERYTHING down smooth and shiny.

I have been sending my zinc parts out to a local shop. But, the yellow zinc they do is a bit too much compared to OEM. As much as I spend on this stuff it may be smarter to get my own setup and do it myself. What setup are you using? Do you have a sample picture of any yellow zinc parts? Or do you just do all of it in the silver/clear?
 

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I just do plain silver zinc because I'm cheap and I am mostly interested in giving parts a little more protection than paint alone, although I do buff most of it to make it look nice too. After studying a few webpages like this and watching some YouTube videos I started with a small experimental setup in a yogurt tub and when that worked I made a bigger setup in an 8 x 12 plastic filing container from the $1 store, following Snakeoil's instructions. I don't have any pics of it yet but I plan to take some of the stuff I am doing this time. I should take pics of the setup too.

If you set up for doing it yourself watch out for the kits that say they will give you an original yellow cad finish - a lot of them are just zinc with a tinted clearcoat.

The elbows appear to have been moulded with a seam in the most visible place. The other ones I have looked closely at appeared to have had the parting lines removed with a fine grinder and then (belt?) sanded or maybe buffed lightly (hard to tell after 20 or 30 years) before they were installed. The ones on the GL650 engine I am working on look like the lines were removed by an untrained kid on his first day on the job who didn't know to use a fine file. I am only really concerned about the file marks because they were deep enough to collect dirt and I'm going to paint them so I didn't worry about making them completely perfect but still I had to file them quite a bit before I could sand them.
 

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Hi Larry,
admiring your skills and patience from afar. Nice work.
When I get my fasteners replated (zinc), I ask for 'blue' pacified. That's the original silver Honda finish and according to my plater is the better corropsion resistance compared to 'yellow' and 'black' pacified.
I pay by the weight here, with a minimum charge for 2kg (4lbs). So I usually fill up a small shoebox of nuts and bolts, brackets and tools, even if they will eventually get painted, just for corrosion resistance.
I restored on 80 year old French autocycle and had everything zinc plated, frame and all, just to make sure it NEVER rusted again :)
Cheers,
Joe
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Bob,
Thanks for the insight on the zinc process you use. It's going to open up a few more possibilities in the future.

Joe,
Patience at this point is a necessity with the way things are going. I'll look up other Zinc shops in my area and see if I can find one that does the process your referring to. I sure wish we had someone that did it by the pound here. The minimum charge at the shop I've been going to is $160, even if it's a few parts.

For now guys, things are at a stand still for a while. We've all been waiting for the call here. It's going to be today that my son and his wife have their baby. Heading to the hospital in a few minutes.
I'll catch up with all this later next week.
 
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