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I just hauled a new to me 83 CX650 Custom home this evening. I've ridden R1's, a few Ducatis, a Shadow ACE and most recently, a Valkyrie, but this is my first foray into something vintage. First step is to fix the frozen front caliper.

I can find a few new ones out of the UK on ebay, but are there any rebuild kits that are more reputable than others? I'll try the trick of pushing out the cylinders and polishing them up a bit, but a decent rebuild would be good peace of mind.
 

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Lots of rebuilding kits are available, composed mostly of a set of anything rubber.
You can also buy new pistons if yours are corroded, cost virtually nothing.

Make sure the return-hole in the master-cylinder is not blocked. Also, replace the hoses for a set of braided steal - the original hoses deteriorate internally.

Use HH (double-H) pads once done - you have vintage technology on the front brake (single disk, limited number of pistons, no cooling, etc), so have the best street legal brake pads you can get.
 

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Welcome to the forum and welcome to the world of antique vehicle ownership (they own us, not the other way around). Your bike is about 4 decades old and the Previous Owners may or may not have done the maintenance necessary to keep it safe & reliable so it is highly recommended to download the Factory Shop Manual for your model (available through the CX Wiki - link in my signature) and go through all of the service procedures, regardless of whether your bike has reached the specified mileage.
I also recommend looking on all rubber parts with suspicion because rubber does not age gracefully. Check the date codes on your tires and replace them if they are over 5 years old no matter how good they look & feel because old rubber simply cannot flow around the irregularities in the asphalt well enough to grip, especially if it is cool or wet. If your bike still has the original rubber brake line(s) (should be replaced every 2 or 3 fluid changes = 5 or 6 years) I recommend shopping for modern stainless braided ones (they last practically forever and double the life of the fluid).

BTW: I like PAD69 brake pads from kapscomoto.com

Oh, and we really like pictures
201891
 

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You can use a rubber tip on your airhose to pop out the brake pistons after you remove the caliper from the bike but be sure to put a wood shim in the space where the brake disc goes or the pistons will shoot out and fly across the garage and maybe kill the dog.
 
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