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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
New member here. I'm going to look at a CX500 custom this weekend. I want to do a cafe racer conversion. I know the custom frame is a little different different than the regular and deluxe frames. Any reason the custom frame won't make a good candidate for this conversion?
 

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Because I'd the dip in the frame where the seat is. Other than that, I think it is a great bike to make into a cafe. I have done one cx and one gl
 

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They all have it. Its one of the things people have many different views on (seat installation). I myself will be fiberglassing a seat pan and cowl to follow the dip. More street fighter style, but who says there are rules?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
No rules. That's exactly why I am doing this project. My last project is done (Type IV engine build) so I need something new.
 

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Sit on your bike with normal seat on, then take off the seat and sit on the frame rails.

Man what a difference.......



 

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One thing you might like to think about at this stage is tyre choice. by that I dont mean brand etc, but shape, as this will have implications into what ever wheels and forks you will run. A cx, although fun thing to ride is more of an ugly betty than a marilyn monroe in the handling stakes so maximising what you have is the name of the game. to that end look for the following tyre profiles, the most triangular rear you like the look of, and the flattest front. The flatter front will be excellant for braking and better able to cope with the additional water weight any watercooled high radiator bike has. the more triangular rear will make the bike steer faster without lowering the speed at which the tyre breaks away, which is what happens when you peak the front tyre profile to one degree or another. Set up that way and used properly a CX becomes quite a good tool for shocking sport bike riders on real roads
 

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One thing you might like to think about at this stage is tyre choice. by that I dont mean brand etc, but shape, as this will have implications into what ever wheels and forks you will run. A cx, although fun thing to ride is more of an ugly betty than a marilyn monroe in the handling stakes so maximising what you have is the name of the game. to that end look for the following tyre profiles, the most triangular rear you like the look of, and the flattest front. The flatter front will be excellant for braking and better able to cope with the additional water weight any watercooled high radiator bike has. the more triangular rear will make the bike steer faster without lowering the speed at which the tyre breaks away, which is what happens when you peak the front tyre profile to one degree or another. Set up that way and used properly a CX becomes quite a good tool for shocking sport bike riders on real roads


IWWT, when you say "Peak" the front tire do you mean choosing a triangular profile front or something different that I may not be picking up on? Also would having a more narrow wheel make the rear tire profile act more triangular or simply distort the tires designed shape? Sorry about the hijack.

Cheers, 50gary
 

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50G

No, you dont want the front tyre to be peaky but flatter in profile, a front tyre has very little use on a bike, other than to help it stop. the main part of steering comes from the rear profile, and that you want peaked, or triangular. Using a narrower rim ( say a 1/4 or so May help, but its not certain, and any narrower will definately ruin the profile. Good thing is though lots of diffeent tyres have lots of different profiles. If you want a quick comparison take a piece of thick copper earthing wire and use it as a maico (or profile) gauge if you dont have one, you can then use it to see profile differences. A quick measure of the sidewall height is also a good clue. Look at the very crap attached pic, done in windows paint ( sorry I dont have a fancy art package or even autocad nowadays)

You see a centre line and two tyre profiles, the black profile is a fairly typical sport touring profile akin to MEz2 or Azaro. The blue lines show the amount of slip angle the profile will induce in the chassis from the rear tyre to the headstock, causing an automatic castering of the forks to instigate a turn. The brown line shows a peakier profile, ie higher crown height in relation to the horn of the tread. You can easily see ( the green lines) that the triangular profile is producing as much slip at mid lean as the flatter profile at full lean, which is why its feels so light to steer, but a flatter front tyre profile allows the tyre to hang on in there a little more so even though the bike is steering faster, the front tyre remains unaffected. If you use a peakier front profile, now the speed of the turn pushes against the smaller contact patch, feeds torque into the sidewall and it slides. I explained this once to a man called Jon taylor, who was the lead instructor in a Nurburgring track club. He changed profiles and dropped his time around the ring by more than 20 seconds but felt more in control and thought he had just done a warm up lap. when he saw the time his jaw nearly broke his toes. Many people, in trying to turn a bike into a sportier proposition fit a peakier front tyre ( say 120/60 instead of 120/70) and then run into all manner of problems as the front end is sapping their confidence in tight turns or tight brake turns, and cant get on the power as early out of the corner. For good forward speed, he who brakes last, normally pretty much kicks you ass. If they can outbrake you and turn faster its game over. So if you can make your bike do that, its so much fun to ride. Done this way, you dont need soft compounds or trick semi slick tyres, just a road, a throttle, and a tank of gas

Once again, apologies for the crap attachment, but I hope it helps you understand the principle
 

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They all have it. Its one of the things people have many different views on (seat installation). I myself will be fiberglassing a seat pan and cowl to follow the dip. More street fighter style, but who says there are rules?


+1 I will be following the frame also
 

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Will do. I'm still a long ways off but I'll start a build thread when I start putting everything back in the frame.
 

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CafeRace, Inc - Manitou Springs, Colorado - 719.685.2475



I bought a CB400/4 seat from these folks and did my own modifications to it I like it just fine. It's just a fibergalss shell but I built a sub frame and welded it to the CX frame. I paid $155.00 and that included the shipping. They also sell a Sigmund Freud action figure and a Jesus action figure. They probably think that's funny. Next time I call them I'm going to ask for an Allah or Mohammed action figure, I think that would be funny.

Cheers, 50gary
 

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50G

No, you dont want the front tyre to be peaky but flatter in profile, a front tyre has very little use on a bike, other than to help it stop. the main part of steering comes from the rear profile, and that you want peaked, or triangular. Using a narrower rim ( say a 1/4 or so May help, but its not certain, and any narrower will definately ruin the profile. Good thing is though lots of diffeent tyres have lots of different profiles. If you want a quick comparison take a piece of thick copper earthing wire and use it as a maico (or profile) gauge if you dont have one, you can then use it to see profile differences. A quick measure of the sidewall height is also a good clue. Look at the very crap attached pic, done in windows paint ( sorry I dont have a fancy art package or even autocad nowadays)

You see a centre line and two tyre profiles, the black profile is a fairly typical sport touring profile akin to MEz2 or Azaro. The blue lines show the amount of slip angle the profile will induce in the chassis from the rear tyre to the headstock, causing an automatic castering of the forks to instigate a turn. The brown line shows a peakier profile, ie higher crown height in relation to the horn of the tread. You can easily see ( the green lines) that the triangular profile is producing as much slip at mid lean as the flatter profile at full lean, which is why its feels so light to steer, but a flatter front tyre profile allows the tyre to hang on in there a little more so even though the bike is steering faster, the front tyre remains unaffected. If you use a peakier front profile, now the speed of the turn pushes against the smaller contact patch, feeds torque into the sidewall and it slides. I explained this once to a man called Jon taylor, who was the lead instructor in a Nurburgring track club. He changed profiles and dropped his time around the ring by more than 20 seconds but felt more in control and thought he had just done a warm up lap. when he saw the time his jaw nearly broke his toes. Many people, in trying to turn a bike into a sportier proposition fit a peakier front tyre ( say 120/60 instead of 120/70) and then run into all manner of problems as the front end is sapping their confidence in tight turns or tight brake turns, and cant get on the power as early out of the corner. For good forward speed, he who brakes last, normally pretty much kicks you ass. If they can outbrake you and turn faster its game over. So if you can make your bike do that, its so much fun to ride. Done this way, you dont need soft compounds or trick semi slick tyres, just a road, a throttle, and a tank of gas

Once again, apologies for the crap attachment, but I hope it helps you understand the principle


Outstanding information, IWWT. Bookmarked
 

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CafeRace, Inc - Manitou Springs, Colorado - 719.685.2475



I bought a CB400/4 seat from these folks and did my own modifications to it I like it just fine. It's just a fibergalss shell but I built a sub frame and welded it to the CX frame. I paid $155.00 and that included the shipping. They also sell a Sigmund Freud action figure and a Jesus action figure. They probably think that's funny. Next time I call them I'm going to ask for an Allah or Mohammed action figure, I think that would be funny.

Cheers, 50gary
Do you have any pics?
 
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