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I plan to strip some clearcoat then polish a few parts, particularly the valve covers and the radiator guards. I read a few posts and got a sense that this is a project I would like to avoid repeating if possible.



Will clearcoating the aluminum parts after polishing eliminate the need to redo the polishing? If so, what clearcoat would you recommend? I'd like to get something from a spray can or brush on since I don't have a compressor or much of a workshop (shed with an extention cord). Thanks.
 

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I'm not sure about clear coating your polished parts to protect them, but as far as clear coat in a can goes I use spraymax 2k. It is alot more expensive than using krylon, however it will stand up to gas and oil. I used it a repaint an old tank that I had. The tank ended up leaking a few seasons later. The paint under the clear coat got washed away, but the clear coat stayed.
 

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If you can find it the 2K mentioned above is the best:

http://www.spraymax.com/index.php?id=361&L=1



In more commonly found spray can products the best is Duplicolor Clear or one I've used called "Truck and SUV Clear" that seems to be almost as good.



I've got a ton of things polished to but due to the weather for now just a light coat of wax is going to be fine for while until I can take the time to bother shoting everything with true DuPont Nason 2-part clear.
 

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I'm not sure about clear coating your polished parts to protect them, but as far as clear coat in a can goes I use spraymax 2k. It is alot more expensive than using krylon, however it will stand up to gas and oil. I used it a repaint an old tank that I had. The tank ended up leaking a few seasons later. The paint under the clear coat got washed away, but the clear coat stayed.
 

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I am not sure about the clear coating of polished aluminum parts.

I know removing the clear is a mess and you will have to remove the clear if

the parts get tarnished or discolored. I have a lot of polished parts on my GL650I

and all they get is a good round of Turtle Wax. My bikes are kept inside out of the weather

but the GL is still very shiny after a year of riding. I think I would rather polish a little

than to remove the clear and then polish. When I wash a bike I dry it with a blast of compressed air

and then wipe as needed, works for me. An electric or gasoline powered leaf blower will blow 90% of

the water off the bike. I also dry my car with the leaf blower when I wash it.
 

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Hey, you actually posted. This is the gentleman that so kindly offered to help me out during all the illness I've been going through this year. Not only a master with a wrench but the guy can polish like crazy. He'd bring me the parts, I'd remove the clear then he'd take them back and polish them.



The clear can be very tough or easy on these bikes. Some of it will come right off with a strong stipper followed by a nylon brush in hot soapy water, other times you may have to repeat this several times even when you're using the strongest stripper available (methylene chloride based) to remove it.



I do know from some of my polishing attemps that if you don't get all the clear off all you'll end up doing is embedding some of the polishing compound into the clear that's left and it won't make much sense. If you've got it down to bare aluminum it will be obvious when you first hit the wheel.
 

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The clear can be very tough or easy on these bikes. Some of it will come right off with a strong stipper followed by a nylon brush in hot soapy water, other times you may have to repeat this several times even when you're using the strongest stripper available (methylene chloride based) to remove it.


I have a heated ultrasonic bath, and found out by accident that Gunk Carb Parts Cleaner removed the clear from my Carb Covers. Maybe the combination of heat casued the clear to soften enough to allow the chemicals to actually lift it?
 

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Stripper usually takes about 15 minutes on most pieces. If I recall the valve covers and especially the oil filter cover (which is both painted and cleared) were the hardest.
 

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You can use carb cleaner in a ultrasonic parts cleaner?

First I've heard that.
 

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You can but you better have good ventilation as the agitation will fill a room full of fumes in virtually no time.



What's the big deal? Go to Home Depot, buy a can of paint stripper and a very cheap bristle brush, the ones often referred to as chip brushes because they aren't worth a darn for painting.



From there all you need is to wait about 15 minutes for the stuff to all bubble up and crinkle, then scrub it off in hot soapy water before the stripper dries because the clear will set back up again.



If you buy the kind I normally use that contains methylene chloride be sure to have some gloves and be very careful. You may not notice the little drop that splattered over onto your arm for about 60 seconds then you'll darn sure know it's there as it burns like heck. No amount of paint thinner or soapy water will stop the burn but it subsides in about an hour or so. Doesn't leave any sort of red spot or scar but it sure doesn't mix with skin.



If you're not confident using it, or if you're unfortunate enough to live in California where I don't think they can even sell it, the newer citrus based strippers work almost as well but take a little longer and may need more than one application.
 

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After a couple of years of curing, the Duplicolor Truck and SUV Clear on the cb750/4 gas tank (bought at Canadian Tire) continues to nearly instantly turn into a gooey mess, with even 1 drop of gas on it. It's a hard surface but not even close to 'fuel resistant'.

Sorry to introduce an opinion counter to other peoples positive reviews for this product. Still, it goes on well and polishes easily, and if fueling is done with care, it's a satisfactory inexpensive way to tart up your tank.
 

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Only the true 2K Urethanes will put up with gasoline reasonably well, just remember that as with any car if you spill gas on it simply let it evaporate, don't try and wipe off the spill. I dread the 5 or 6 coats of 2K clear I'm going to have to finish my tank with (decals go on after coat 4) but I know it has to be done if I want the finish to last.



Most of the aluminum parts we end up polishing have a low chance of getting gas on them so it's not as much of an issue.



Duplicolor makes darn good paint but be careful as most of it takes a lot longer to fully dry than the normal spray can stuff you may be used to.
 

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In short I would not do it. CC will not etch into the polished alu...it will look great when new, first chip and it will all flake off, collect dirt and look worse then ever, no going to even mention the heat problem...either powdercoat or anodise....if you polish you'll have to keep on polishing for the rest of it's life...
 

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I know that there is a reference posting about pollishing metal. I have read it several times but what I want to know is how you get the in between areas of the fins on the valve covers done. What do you use to get into that small, deep space? I have tried a Dremell Tool with 800 grit wet or dry paper on it. Very slow! Ideas?
 

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Well, after polishing lots of parts on my bike, i have some advice.



DONT clear parts that get hot or are touched often...... clear yellows and rubs off easily.



after dealing with polished aluminum parts for a season, I am having my buddy chrome the polished parts.....
 

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I know that there is a reference posting about pollishing metal. I have read it several times but what I want to know how you get the in between the areas of the fins on the valve covers done. What do you use to get into that small, deep space? I have tried a Dremell Tool with 800 grit wet or dry paper on it. Very slow! Ideas?




I am going down the patch of cleaning the rocker covers in the not-too distant future...I will likely try a 8 to 10" rag wheel at a slower rpm to allow the rags to follow deep into the valleys...make sure you do this over a foam block, and old pillow, something soft in case the wheel grabs the cover from you! Lots of rouge, a good pair of leather gloves cause the aluminum will get hot...my uncle polishes until the aluminum gets really really hot...it usually polishes better once it has warmed a bit from the friction of polishing.
 

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One of the problems with trying to clear-coat polished aluminium is that by definition,unless specialized clear-coat/paint,the paint requires a matt surface to adhere to.This is why it usually flakes off and is easily chipped.Then the job looks worse than if there were no clear-coat on it.



I've looked into quite a few polishes and here's a decent site,



http://www.autoexpress.co.uk/products/products/55103/car_polishes_and_waxes.html



There are several ways of polishing Alloys e.g metal polish then a sealer-wax or an all-in-one system.



Meguiars stuff has good reviews as does,"Brilliant"



http://www.performancemotorcare.com...10&network=s&gclid=CJaehNiVn6YCFVAf4QodJVZ5Yw
 

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Canadian tire sells a product called "Nevr-Dull" it's a simple 'wadding' laced with polish compound.

Once your item has been polished once, a quick once over with this stuff after the bike has been washed

will bring all your polished surfaces back to brite and shiny.

Nevr-Dull It's easy to use, only $10 for a can that will last 5 or 6 seasons, and reusable - for the most part.
 
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