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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I remember reading here to use vinegar. now, I am searching for threads which mention it and can't seem to find any. Is there a better method to clean the inside of my tank? dude who painted it recommended i clean out the tank.



after searching online, I see about 300000 different methods:



fish tank gravel + diesel fuel?

toilet bowl cleaner?

acid?

Kleem?

and tons of others.



is it 100% necessary to seal the tank as well? I am reading this is often a bad bad idea when the bike's got a carburetor.



might also be important to mention the tank's outside is painted. (save destroying it)
 

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As far as chemicals go I use a phosphoric acid solution, but there's a few others on this site who can better advise you on the chemicals.



It usually pays though to give the tank a good clean inside with a heavy duty alkaline cleaner before you start the derusting/converting.



A yard of chain added to the tank and an hour or so tank turning will remove the loose crap in the tank.



Nuts work too but you can spend a long tome getting them back out. With the chain, once you've got hold of it it comes out in one go.
 

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The bottle of cleaner I have here won't be available by brand name over there but look for a product at your local auto parts store with alkaline salts as the active ingredient at 15 to 20 grams per litre. Should be pretty common stuff. You'll need a couple of litres so probably best grab a gallon. It shouldn't be expensive.



Dilute by 4 to 1 and fill tank to the top, agitate with chain and repeat until you stop seeing crap when you drain it.

Rinse thoroughly with hot water.



This stuff will remove fuel varnish as well as general crap and leave the surface ready for derusting.



EDIT. You only need to fill the tank about a third of the way. Fill only if you want to soak it overnight before you start the agitation. [Works better this way]
 

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In the next couple of days I plan to work up that Electrolysis cleaning method using my battery charger. I think if you search for Electrolysis, Shep had a great link that detailed the essentials...seems simple, inexpensive (if you have a battery charger) and like a really cool way to go. I will post pics of my set up and let ya know how it works...course you might be riding by then at the rate you're going!
the bike is looking reaaallly AWESOME!
 

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I have never used the electrolysis method but I saw a tank a friend was treating and he had it full of the solution with the electrolysis wire and anode or whatever running in through the filler cap hole. You may still be able to use this method but it would also depend on the amount of heat generated.
 

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A good tank liner kit will probably contain the company that sells it's version of the same basic items and work well if a quality product is used per instructions.



I have no knowledge at all of the kit in your link other than that I have heard of it.

Someone else may have used it and be able to give you some feedback.



I've used Por 15 sealer with my own prep and my tanks been fine for the last 2 years or so.



KBS gold is also a very good one.



The Kreem kit is a very good price if the kit is a good one.
 

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A lot of sellers hang fairly random tags on ebay items so it comes up as often as possible in varied searches.
 

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Two things:

I had great results with "CLR" (Calcium-Line-Rust), avaiable at almost every store.



For the nuts, you can put them on fishing line before you drop them in to remove them all at once, takes a minute or two to tie them all on, but you can get to smaller areas than a chain that way.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Two things:

I had great results with "CLR" (Calcium-Line-Rust), avaiable at almost every store.



For the nuts, you can put them on fishing line before you drop them in to remove them all at once, takes a minute or two to tie them all on, but you can get to smaller areas than a chain that way.


excellent idea. did you clean w/ water first and after the CLR? when the CLR was in there, did you shake the tank? how long? how long should the CLR sit in there?
 

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Here is what I did (just this week actually!):

1. Remove tank, take out petcock and cap (I was painting it too)

2. Cork petcock, fill with water, swirl, remove cork

3. Pour in CLR (1/5 of the way up, maybe a bit excessive but I only paid like 3 bucks for the bottle), swirl.

4. Pour in water (3/5 tank more)

5. Let sit for at least 30 minutes, I let it sit for 2 hours because I started to read a book and forgot

6. Drain

7. Drop in nuts with fishing line

8. get a small child to roll it back and forth across the lawn for a dollar

9. rinse with water

10. Repeat 3-6

11. Rinse with water

12. Let sit out to evap. water until dry.

13. Seal (if you are going to)
 

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To summerize:

CLR is a 1/10 ratio according to the bottle (I double it)

Let sit for a least half an hour, more is better

Water rinse before and after, just to get chunks out.

Shaking the tank isn't necessary, but it does help if you flip it a few times, just to get the entire surface area of the inside.
 

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You don't have to seal it, but if you are going to be keeping the bike for years it won't hurt. It just saves you from needing to redo this process in the future. If you know someone at a paint or hardware store, you could put the nuts in, wrap it in a blanket, and mount it in a paint shaker (don't let the manager see you).
 

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I just completed the electrolysis process and it can be done very easily without impacting the outside finish. Note, no heat is generated with this process.



I used this web page as a guide http://www.altelco.net/~jacil/clay/motorcycle/KElecSetup.html



Used a 24 inch, 1/4" threaded rod, a #9 rubber stopper drilled to accept the rod, two fender washers and two nuts. Eyeballed the threaded rod next to the tank to determine how long to make it, bent it and mounted it into the stopper with the washers and nuts.



You will need to adjust the angle of the bend in the threaded rod so you can both snake it in to the tank as well as position it in place to that it does not touch any portion of the tank. The longer, the better to present the most surface area. If the anode touches the tank, it will cause a short which could damage your power source. I put a short length of 1/4" rubber hose on the end of the threaded rod to insulate it from the tank in case the rod shifts while I was away.



It is best to use a non-regulated and non-intelligent battery charger/power source; one that supplies a constant voltage and amperage. More modern battery chargers have sensing circuits to make sure it does not overcharge the battery or that there is actually a battery attached to it, which is counter productive for this application. I used an old 2A Radio Shack CB radio power supply.



I removed and cleaned the anode every 12 hours (unplug the charger first!), and replaced the solution once, at the third anode cleaning. Took four days in all, until I was not getting additonal depositis on the anode.



Finished it off with a 1 hour internal bath of phosphoric acid (I got mine at Home Depot), diluted to approximately 10% concentration with water heated to 140 degress F. Note, always add acid to water. I used a large funnel to pour it in and a siphon to empty it out. Save the last batch of electrolysis mixture to act as a neutralizer for the acid. Note, phosporic acid is not as dangerous as muriatic acid and will not etch or otherwise destroy unrusted metal but you should still take care by wearing rubber gloves, eye protection and having a few boxes of baking soda around as a neutralizer. I did get some of the dilute phosphoric acid on the outside of the tank and it did not have any impact on the finish. At a lesser concentration, phosphoric acid can be found in soft drinks. It is also the active ingredient in what is called "Nava Jelly".



Used a shop vac in blow mode to dry out the tank.



Again, the outside of the tank was never subjected to the electrolysis or phosphoric acid treatments.





Greg
 

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I just completed the electrolysis process and it can be done very easily without impacting the outside finish. Note, no heat is generated with this process.



I used this web page as a guide http://www.altelco.net/~jacil/clay/motorcycle/KElecSetup.html



Used a 24 inch, 1/4" threaded rod, a #9 rubber stopper drilled to accept the rod, two fender washers and two nuts. Eyeballed the threaded rod next to the tank to determine how long to make it, bent it and mounted it into the stopper with the washers and nuts.



You will need to adjust the angle of the bend in the threaded rod so you can both snake it in to the tank as well as position it in place to that it does not touch any portion of the tank. The longer, the better to present the most surface area. If the anode touches the tank, it will cause a short which could damage your power source. I put a short length of 1/4" rubber hose on the end of the threaded rod to insulate it from the tank in case the rod shifts while I was away.



It is best to use a non-regulated and non-intelligent battery charger/power source; one that supplies a constant voltage and amperage. More modern battery chargers have sensing circuits to make sure it does not overcharge the battery or that there is actually a battery attached to it, which is counter productive for this application. I used an old 2A Radio Shack CB radio power supply.



I removed and cleaned the anode every 12 hours (unplug the charger first!), and replaced the solution once, at the third anode cleaning. Took four days in all, until I was not getting additonal depositis on the anode.



Finished it off with a 1 hour internal bath of phosphoric acid (I got mine at Home Depot), diluted to approximately 10% concentration with water heated to 140 degress F. Note, always add acid to water. I used a large funnel to pour it in and a siphon to empty it out. Save the last batch of electrolysis mixture to act as a neutralizer for the acid. Note, phosporic acid is not as dangerous as muriatic acid and will not etch or otherwise destroy unrusted metal but you should still take care by wearing rubber gloves, eye protection and having a few boxes of baking soda around as a neutralizer. I did get some of the dilute phosphoric acid on the outside of the tank and it did not have any impact on the finish. At a lesser concentration, phosphoric acid can be found in soft drinks. It is also the active ingredient in what is called "Nava Jelly".



Used a shop vac in blow mode to dry out the tank.



Again, the outside of the tank was never subjected to the electrolysis or phosphoric acid treatments.





Greg






Kudos Greg,...fantastic detail and I hope to try your steps in exact fashion!
 
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