Honda CX 500 Forum banner
1 - 20 of 29 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,265 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just wondering if anyone here at CC has any experience or even heard of this company Chinasidecar ?



Couple of them kicking around e-bay in Canada, just don't know anybody personally or even seen one in person.



Interesting concept of rebuilding old German technology. Full load package about $4000-$4500.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
583 Posts
I have no experience with them,



but honestly, I wouldn't touch anything motorized that was chinese-made with a ten foot pole. The metallurgy is awful.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,597 Posts
I have no experience with them,



but honestly, I wouldn't touch anything motorized that was chinese-made with a ten foot pole. The metallurgy is awful.




ok i understand our bikes are jap but i am willing to bet the chinese help make it
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
583 Posts
ok i understand our bikes are jap but i am willing to bet the chinese help make it
Outsourcing is different.



I'm talking about chinese companies. I've had a chinese scooter, and chinese dirtbike. They both used ripped-off honda motors (you could actually buy some honda replacement motor parts) but were vastly inferior quality. The paint flaked, the plastic cracked, the frames were made of some sort of ultra-soft steel that would bend if you looked at it wrong....



Just not a good idea. Maybe they will get better, but as of now I would pass.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
402 Posts
ok so these are chinese knock-offs of a Ural wich is a russian knock-off of a german bmw.... designed in the 1930's



well.... I see a trend here, next there will be a Nigerian knock-off of the Chinese-Russian-German bike that is more outdated than a current model HD.... but it is sad to say I'd rather have the China bike.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,601 Posts
When our bikes were built they were still using good metals over there, nowadays there's probably 1,000 different "mixes" that can be bought from melted down surplus.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
492 Posts
I have first hand experience with the CJ750 sidecar bikes, and some of the companies that build them and sell spare parts. I had one built to my specs last year, and imported it from China to Norway.



I would advise you to tread very carefully. The CJ750 could be a good bike, if built by competent people, but many are not. I myself would prefer someone else than the company you suggested. There have not been any new CJ750's available since 2006 when the offical factories stopped production. All CJ's that come up for sale now are built up from parts or are restored military or civilian bikes. Some are good, some are bad.



Generally the military (PLA) bikes are of better quality, the older the better. There are some really awful new pattern parts around.



In my opinion, CJ750's look better and are better built than similar russian sidecar bikes, except the 2007-on Urals which seem to be of superb finish & quality.



There is a great site on CJ's here: http://www.changjiangunlimited.com
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
170 Posts
It looks to be yet another reincarnation of the Ural/Dniepr 1937 BMW knock offs from war reparations. Be careful with companies such as this as the production they promise, and the production they deliver are normally two very different stories. Speak to people who are used to dealing with China and they will tell you its a crazy place. this is simply not true, china went beyond crazy many years ago!

If you do decide to buy it, then I would strip it apart totally, repaint it, re wire it, and reassemble it properly ( as I am sure they would not have done that) and it may well be worth it, as this old design was incredibly reliable and was made to be both hardy and easy to repair
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,265 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
MGR1, thank-you for your input and 1st hand knowledge. Yes I have been to the ChangJiang site too. Actually I have been



to about 6 different sites related to Chinese sidecars, which are the old BMW technology. Still intrigues me, albeit I



doubt very much I would order one sight unseen. I would like to see and drive one locally before actually ever wanting to



purchase. So I appreciate any and all comments on this subject, as I am sure interested in owning a hack.



BTW still looking for one for the GL, anybody know of one? Closer than 1000 miles from me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
I was very interested in them a couple of years ago. I did alot of research on trying to get one here in the states.

First, they say they are "rebuilt" PLA motorcycles. That is not true. they are not rebuilt. they are built brand new and called rebuilt so that they do not have to meet modern emmission standards. The factories that build them have been building them for years.

They are BMW copies. There are 2 main styles. A flathead motor and an OHV motor. They are sold in military colors, flat black, green, desert sand, etc. The chromed out flame job bikes are as far as I can tell actually built that way, not repainted and reworked. I'm honestly not 100% sure of my assessment of that but that is what it all adds up to. there is alot of misrepresentation on these machines for a number of reasons.



The factories that build them have been building them for 70 years. The Russian Ural factory was built after WWII as part of Grmany's war reparations. They had to give up all of their patent rights. So the russians built a factory and built URALS.

The Chinesee were Russia's pals in Communisium so The russians gave them plans for a factory to build them. Over the years the Urals changed into what we have today. The chinese factorys, from what I understand, Have been making the same parts sine the late forty's using pretty much the same tooling the whole time, with little improvements. The newer electrics started in the 90's when they started to find interest in the bikes outside of China.



Personally I like them. But for the money and hassle they are not worth it to me. I I could find a complete setup for under $2000.00 that needs work I'd be in. they seem to be pretty reliable from what I have read, but the paint is cheap and all the parts are built on 70 year old machinery. Truly a classic bike, built like they used to make them, which is both good and bad

I got a chance to ride one around the block at Daytona BMW during bike week a couple of years ago. It was cool but they wanted $7500 for it, TO TO much
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
I was very interested in them a couple of years ago. I did alot of research on trying to get one here in the states.

First, they say they are "rebuilt" PLA motorcycles. That is not true. they are not rebuilt. they are built brand new and called rebuilt so that they do not have to meet modern emmission standards. The factories that build them have been building them for years.

They are BMW copies. There are 2 main styles. A flathead motor and an OHV motor. They are sold in military colors, flat black, green, desert sand, etc. The chromed out flame job bikes are as far as I can tell actually built that way, not repainted and reworked. I'm honestly not 100% sure of my assessment of that but that is what it all adds up to. there is alot of misrepresentation on these machines for a number of reasons.



The factories that build them have been building them for 70 years. The Russian Ural factory was built after WWII as part of Grmany's war reparations. They had to give up all of their patent rights. So the russians built a factory and built URALS.

The Chinesee were Russia's pals in Communisium so The russians gave them plans for a factory to build them. Over the years the Urals changed into what we have today. The chinese factorys, from what I understand, Have been making the same parts sine the late forty's using pretty much the same tooling the whole time, with little improvements. The newer electrics started in the 90's when they started to find interest in the bikes outside of China.



Personally I like them. But for the money and hassle they are not worth it to me. I I could find a complete setup for under $2000.00 that needs work I'd be in. they seem to be pretty reliable from what I have read, but the paint is cheap and all the parts are built on 70 year old machinery. Truly a classic bike, built like they used to make them, which is both good and bad

I got a chance to ride one around the block at Daytona BMW during bike week a couple of years ago. It was cool but they wanted $7500 for it, TO TO much
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,104 Posts
I enjoyed looking around the site and love that retro look but

like others, have reservations about quality and spares backup

If one came along dirt cheap, it would be fun though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
369 Posts
Not sure I would trust Chinese engineering further than the scrap yard. Safety isn't a concern just moving lots of items quickly.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
382 Posts
Outsourcing is different.



I'm talking about chinese companies. I've had a chinese scooter, and chinese dirtbike. They both used ripped-off honda motors (you could actually buy some honda replacement motor parts) but were vastly inferior quality. The paint flaked, the plastic cracked, the frames were made of some sort of ultra-soft steel that would bend if you looked at it wrong....



Just not a good idea. Maybe they will get better, but as of now I would pass.




When I was growing up, "Made In Japan" was synonymous with cheap. How times have changed. I would look for Chinese products to improve greatly in the next decade. Look how far the Koreans have come in the last 10 years.



These people aren't stupid and they want to succeed. I expect they'll do what is necessary.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,379 Posts
How times have changed. I would look for Chinese products to improve greatly in the next decade.






At least their plastic is of good quality. about 4 years ago, GE sold off their plastics division (it's the plastic that makes up the dashes in GM vehicles these days, among other things... ABS, Lexan). The company itself went to a Saudi based group, but GE sold the technology itself to the Chinese. Now they are building a few plants over there to make that plastic.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
492 Posts
First, they say they are "rebuilt" PLA motorcycles. That is not true. they are not rebuilt. they are built brand new and called rebuilt so that they do not have to meet modern emmission standards. The factories that build them have been building them for years.


The factories closed down in 2006, no new CJ's have been available for some years. All the ones that are sold now are restored. Mine was also. If you ask you can get them to take photos of the restoring process. I got heaps of photos from the company that build mine. My bike started out as a run-down military bike. They fitted a new sidecar bucket, new engine, gearbox, final drive, wheels, tank, seats etc. All verified with photos.



In the pics I could also see dozens of similar bikes undergoing restoration, with various options and paint schemes.



There are several things a potential buyer should be aware of.



* The bikes are restored, so many components are second hand. Quality of those components varies.

* Old military parts (PLA) are the best, but getting scarse now and are getting expensive, even compared to classic jap parts.

* The chinese tend to use A LOT of bondo, on some sidecars it could be one inch thick. You must instruct them spesifically not to do so.

* The chinese LOVE stainless steel fasteners and acorn nuts, everywhere. Some of these do not fit well or are of inferior quality.

* The preparation before painting is sometimes not very good, leading to rusting.

* Sometimes part from different models are put together and don't work or fit well. New owner must sort it out himself.

* The chinese tend to agree with you when you give them instructions, and then do something else.

* Order a cheap bike ($2000-3000) and you get utter crap. Order an expensive bike ($5000-6000), and if you are lucky, you get a good one.

* That is if you paid directly to the chinese company. If you buy from some domestic company that imports CJ's themselves, they pay $2000 and sell for $5000, and you get a crap bike.

* 6V (old PLA sidevalve without reverse) bikes have the best build quality.



Having said that, there are some positive aspects as well:

* The CJ750 is quite pleasant to drive, for a hack.

* If well built, they are very durable.

* The maintenance is very easy, and parts are not hard to get from internet vendors.

* The bike looks very classic and cool, and is a real head-turner. Park it to the newest Jap rocket and see people walk right by it and towards your hack, every time.

* Kids just love it :).

* The steel used in the frame and various components is very good. Bucket and mudguards are of heavy gauge steel. All parts seem very durable. Some are well made.

* CJ's look much better than similar year russian ones, and have better welding and castings.

* 12V bikes have electric start. Really cool.

* Newer bikes have reverse. Also cool.



Hope this is useful info.



PM me if you need some more.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
If the design is patent free, I would love to see an American company put out a unit like this. Currently considering the URAL sidecar unit, Patrol, but at 13 grand it is really hard to swallow.



I hate harley's but it they decide to build a URAL copy and sell around the 10 grand range it would be first on my list.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
977 Posts
I saw one of these military type side car rigs with the BMW type engine and was surprised to see the sidecar wheel was powered by a 1/2 shaft that came from the rear wheel of the bike. I believe it had 2 U joints. BillRod
 
1 - 20 of 29 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top