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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am restoring an 81 cx500c. I am an amateur, so decided to get a repair manual. Decided to take carburetors off to clean them, before receiving the repair manual. I separated the two carbs, only to find out the repair manual says its not nessasery. So I have cleaned the carbs and trying to put back together and realizing it was a huge mistake. And when I pulled them apart, a bigger spring went flying. I have no idea where it came from. Am I gonna be able to do this?
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Which manual did you buy? I highly recommend Larry’s Carb book. If you read his book you will most likely be tearing your carbs apart again to clean them properly and you will be able to put them back together following the directions in the book. Many others here will chime in with the same sentiments.
 

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Buy Larry's carb book. Before you do anything else. Believe me. And be ready to go slow and follow all the way through. It's intricate but after the first set you will have acquired a valuable life skill. And you'll find you probably dont have them as clean as you think. Dennis Kirk and David Silver Spares have the parts you'll need. Peace
 

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That spring can be manipulated back into place in a few minutes without separating the carbs again.

Takes 30 seconds if you hold your mouth right.

Pinch the spring down short and fit it to the little projection on one side and push it in to the gap.

208969


Note that I have pointed out the choke side as this is what is visible in your photo. It actually fits in the same position on the throttle side.
 

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1982 GL500i
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Randakk's has the best replacement seal kits and instructions for these carbs, as well as petcock kits.
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
That spring can be manipulated back into place in a few minutes without separating the carbs again.

Takes 30 seconds if you hold your mouth right.

Pinch the spring down short and fit it to the little projection on one side and push it in to the gap.

View attachment 208969

Note that I have pointed out the choke side as this is what is visible in your photo. It actually fits in the same position on the throttle side.
THANK YOU!!!! Greatly appreciated!
 

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'84 CX650E that is evolving into a GL500
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When the manuals were written they weren't really expecting many people to still be working on them 4 decades later. If nobody else has ever separated the carbs they are likely to still have the original o-rings on the pipes that run between the carbs and 40 year old rubber that spent most f its life in contact with a strong solvent (gasoline) isn't to be trusted so separating them now to replace all of those rubber bits is probably a much better idea now than when the book you have was written..

Welcome to the forum. Please add your location and your bike's model and model year to your profile so that you don't have to remember to tell us every time and we don't have to keep asking when you forget (see Forum Settings link in my signature).

And welcome to the world of antique vehicle ownership (they own us, not the other way around). Your bike is about 4 decades old and the Previous Owners may or may not have done the maintenance necessary to keep it safe & reliable so it is highly recommended to download the Factory Shop Manual for your model (available through the CX Wiki - link in my signature) and go through all of the service procedures, regardless of whether your bike has reached the specified mileage.
Note that the FSMs for the CX family are particularly well written and laid out so they are a far better reference than any aftermarket book (Larry's carb book being the exception). Clymer manuals in particular are notable for the number of errors in them (the one for the GL1000 tells you to reverse the locations of the 2 jets!!!)

I also recommend looking on all rubber parts with suspicion because rubber does not age gracefully. Check the date codes on your tires and replace them if they are over 5 years old no matter how good they look & feel (old rubber simply cannot flow around the irregularities in the asphalt well enough to grip, especially if it is cool or wet). If your bike still has the original rubber brake line(s) (should be replaced every 2 or 3 fluid changes = 5 or 6 years) I recommend shopping for modern stainless braided ones (they last practically forever and double the life of the fluid). And don't forget things like the rad hoses and the boot between the engine and swingarm (they can crack on the bottom where you don't see it).
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thank you all for your comments. Now I gotta change oil and filter, change spark plugs, replace some fuel lines and battery, they see if I can start it. Wish me luck.
When the manuals were written they weren't really expecting many people to still be working on them 4 decades later. If nobody else has ever separated the carbs they are likely to still have the original o-rings on the pipes that run between the carbs and 40 year old rubber that spent most f its life in contact with a strong solvent (gasoline) isn't to be trusted so separating them now to replace all of those rubber bits is probably a much better idea now than when the book you have was written..

Welcome to the forum. Please add your location and your bike's model and model year to your profile so that you don't have to remember to tell us every time and we don't have to keep asking when you forget (see Forum Settings link in my signature).

And welcome to the world of antique vehicle ownership (they own us, not the other way around). Your bike is about 4 decades old and the Previous Owners may or may not have done the maintenance necessary to keep it safe & reliable so it is highly recommended to download the Factory Shop Manual for your model (available through the CX Wiki - link in my signature) and go through all of the service procedures, regardless of whether your bike has reached the specified mileage.
Note that the FSMs for the CX family are particularly well written and laid out so they are a far better reference than any aftermarket book (Larry's carb book being the exception). Clymer manuals in particular are notable for the number of errors in them (the one for the GL1000 tells you to reverse the locations of the 2 jets!!!)

I also recommend looking on all rubber parts with suspicion because rubber does not age gracefully. Check the date codes on your tires and replace them if they are over 5 years old no matter how good they look & feel (old rubber simply cannot flow around the irregularities in the asphalt well enough to grip, especially if it is cool or wet). If your bike still has the original rubber brake line(s) (should be replaced every 2 or 3 fluid changes = 5 or 6 years) I recommend shopping for modern stainless braided ones (they last practically forever and double the life of the fluid). And don't forget things like the rad hoses and the boot between the engine and swingarm (they can crack on the bottom where you don't see it).
I had also bought a carburetor repair kit, but ended up leaving most parts in the carb. Mainly because the pieces didn't match exactly. I did replace o-rings on the tube, and replaced the gaskets for bowls. Not sure the last time this bike was running. Gonna need a lot of TLC. But over all it looks great. Very minimal rust. Havent even gotten it to turn over yet. I did hand crank it and seemed smooth as butter so......fingers crossed
 

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'84 CX650E that is evolving into a GL500
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I had also bought a carburetor repair kit, but ended up leaving most parts in the carb. Mainly because the pieces didn't match exactly.
This is a good sign. A lot of people figure if it came in the kit they have to use it whether it is the same or not and then can't figure out why (for example) the carbs overflow with the new, shorter float needles.
 
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