Honda CX 500 Forum banner
1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
1982 CX500C US import
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Greeting fellow forum members, my first question to the forum, so please be gentle if this has been asked before.

I act as mechanic (amateur not pro') for my brother in laws '82 CX500C.

After some issues I decided the carbs needed a good clean.

Just wondering if anyone has used these rebuild kits from eBay, if not from any other suppliers to the UK.



On a final note I ride a 74 Cb750 k4 but having done various bits and pieces on the CX I do have to say I'm really enjoying it and can see me getting one for myself for a, winter hack.

My aspirations for my own will have to wait as brother in laws bike has the dreaded starter clutch issue which I need to sort.

Regards

Peter

Worcester UK
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,891 Posts
Have a look at the carbs before ordering the kit. When I did the carbs on my GL500 I didn't use any new parts. Has been running fine for several years. It did however require a good cleaning.

The jets in many of the rebuild kits are not as good as the original bits and some, such as the float needle valve are much worse.

 
  • Like
Reactions: richnct

·
Registered
1982 CX500C US import
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Many thanks for the prompt reply Mark.

Carbs now stripped and have been in the ultrasonic cleaner.

To be honest jets seem OK the kit is more for the bowl gasket and o rings. I did look at buying o rings from a local supplier but they're really expensive in small quantities.

Thanks for the link to the Wiki page really useful info'

Peter
 

·
Registered
1981 PC01 CX500 Custom
Joined
·
57 Posts
Hi Peter, if you consider getting the slow jet out:
You could use a M2.5 tap, drive it into the slow jet after removing the black rubber plug. Then you can use a M2.5 bold and nut to pull it out of the carb. You will need a washer as well.
Easy-peasy :)
Handwriting Rectangle Aircraft Font Slope
Handwriting Rectangle Aircraft Font Slope
 

·
Super Moderator
'84 CX650E that is evolving into a GL500
Joined
·
18,979 Posts
Note that the better carb kits for old Hondas don't include jets, needles &c because the people who prepare those kits understand that 1) those parts rarely need to be replaced and 2) when they are needed the ones they can buy in bulk are never as good as the ones you can buy at your local Honda dealer.
We have heard countless tales of woe from people who have installed the out of spec jets, needles &c that came in carb kits and their bikes didn't run well or the float valves wouldn't close properly (or worse, a few months later the chrome flaked off of the float needles and caused a whole new set of issues).

BTW: Welcome to the forum. Please add your location and your brother in law's bike's model and model year (NOT year first registered as UK paperwork shows) to your profile so that you don't have to remember to tell us every time and we don't have to keep asking when you forget (see Forum Settings link in my signature). You can add the info about your own CX/GL500/650 when you get it (you know you want to) ;-)

And welcome to the world of antique vehicle ownership (they own us, not the other way around). Any old bike (especially one over 4 decades old) may or may not have had all of the maintenance necessary to keep it safe & reliable, even if the Previous Owners had good intentions and did their best, so it is highly recommended to download the Factory Shop Manual for your model (available through the CX Wiki - link in my signature) and go through all of the service procedures, regardless of whether your bike has reached the specified mileage.
I also recommend looking on all rubber parts with suspicion because rubber does not age gracefully. YOu probably already know to check the date codes on the tires and replace them if they are over 5 years old no matter how good they look & feel (old rubber simply cannot flow around the irregularities in the asphalt well enough to grip, especially if it is cool or wet) but most don't realize that the original rubber brake line(s) should be replaced every 2 or 3 fluid changes (= 5 or 6 years). If the lines are rubber I recommend shopping for modern stainless braided ones (they last practically forever and double the life of the fluid).
And don't forget things like the rad hoses and the boot between the engine and swingarm (they can crack on the bottom where you don't see it).
 

·
Registered
1982 CX500C US import
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Hi Peter, if you consider getting the slow jet out:
You could use a M2.5 tap, drive it into the slow jet after removing the black rubber plug. Then you can use a M2.5 bold and nut to pull it out of the carb. You will need a washer as well.
Easy-peasy :)
View attachment 212897 View attachment 212897
Something I'm considering having investigated the carbs. One of the issues with the bike is poor starting although I one thing I did find was a blocked vent on the nearside carb (furthest from fuel tap) hence lack of fuel supply.

So far managed to clean one carb that was before the cleaner packed up working, yet something else to sort out.

Thanks for the input

Peter
 

·
Registered
1982 CX500C US import
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Note that the better carb kits for old Hondas don't include jets, needles &c because the people who prepare those kits understand that 1) those parts rarely need to be replaced and 2) when they are needed the ones they can buy in bulk are never as good as the ones you can buy at your local Honda dealer.
We have heard countless tales of woe from people who have installed the out of spec jets, needles &c that came in carb kits and their bikes didn't run well or the float valves wouldn't close properly (or worse, a few months later the chrome flaked off of the float needles and caused a whole new set of issues).

BTW: Welcome to the forum. Please add your location and your brother in law's bike's model and model year (NOT year first registered as UK paperwork shows) to your profile so that you don't have to remember to tell us every time and we don't have to keep asking when you forget (see Forum Settings link in my signature). You can add the info about your own CX/GL500/650 when you get it (you know you want to) ;-)

And welcome to the world of antique vehicle ownership (they own us, not the other way around). Any old bike (especially one over 4 decades old) may or may not have had all of the maintenance necessary to keep it safe & reliable, even if the Previous Owners had good intentions and did their best, so it is highly recommended to download the Factory Shop Manual for your model (available through the CX Wiki - link in my signature) and go through all of the service procedures, regardless of whether your bike has reached the specified mileage.
I also recommend looking on all rubber parts with suspicion because rubber does not age gracefully. YOu probably already know to check the date codes on the tires and replace them if they are over 5 years old no matter how good they look & feel (old rubber simply cannot flow around the irregularities in the asphalt well enough to grip, especially if it is cool or wet) but most don't realize that the original rubber brake line(s) should be replaced every 2 or 3 fluid changes (= 5 or 6 years). If the lines are rubber I recommend shopping for modern stainless braided ones (they last practically forever and double the life of the fluid).
And don't forget things like the rad hoses and the boot between the engine and swingarm (they can crack on the bottom where you don't see it).
Thanks for the intro' Bob I'll sort out my profile.

Having been restoring bikes for the last 20 years I'm familiar with the pitfalls of brake hoses tyres etc but never having a CX thanks for the particular tips.

I started with old Brit Iron restoring a 72 Triumph Daytona followed by a 75 T150V Trident. These were followed by a 72 Yam RD350 and ending up with a 74 Honda 750 K4.
Brother in law bought the CX about 3 years ago to replace a heavier Yamaha Virago 1100 which was getting too much at his age. The first job I did on the bike was to replace the handlebars with 14" 'ape hangers' not my cup of tea but surprisingly not to uncomfortable when you get used to them!

Thanks again for the welcome

Peter
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top