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Discussion Starter #941
I love the signals, but you should have made three! That way if you ever accidentially tipped the bike over and busted one, you'd already have a replacement :)

Charles.
This is the kind of foresight I wish I had lol :sulkiness:
You raise a very good point, and one that I wish I had thought of back when I had access to the tools needed to make them. Now I just have to hope I don't ever drop the bike, or be prepared for the nightmare of making another one. Or go back to the normal signals, but what fun is that :p
 

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Discussion Starter #943
In that case I shall make sure to put the bike away for winter :p
 

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Man, reading through this build thread, I feel like a complete amateur. My build has no machined parts, everything was as my dad put it; "hammered and filed to fit". I did all my fabrication with angle grinders, cutting torches, a flux welder (or as I like to call it, "Mister Spatter"), files, a BFH, a drill press, taps, dies, etc. But nothing with precision. Nothing ever precise, more of a "mock it up, weld something, see if it fits, grind it a bit, repeat until it looks okay". Nothing with a plan, just an idea that I finagled into a workable solution with time and patience and constantly changing ideas.

But you've created a wonderfully polished, factory-finished machine. I thought mine was pretty good, that the blemishes were hidden or not readily apparent... but yours is better than a factory ride, it's better than most bikes out there. And I've been doing this for years, it sounds like you're still in school! Good show, sir! Good show!

Charles.
 

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Man, reading through this build thread, I feel like a complete amateur. My build has no machined parts, everything was as my dad put it; "hammered and filed to fit". I did all my fabrication with angle grinders, cutting torches, a flux welder (or as I like to call it, "Mister Spatter"), files, a BFH, a drill press, taps, dies, etc. But nothing with precision. Nothing ever precise, more of a "mock it up, weld something, see if it fits, grind it a bit, repeat until it looks okay". Nothing with a plan, just an idea that I finagled into a workable solution with time and patience and constantly changing ideas.

But you've created a wonderfully polished, factory-finished machine. I thought mine was pretty good, that the blemishes were hidden or not readily apparent... but yours is better than a factory ride, it's better than most bikes out there. And I've been doing this for years, it sounds like you're still in school! Good show, sir! Good show!

Charles.
You can't compare your spendable time, skills, help and available tools. Everyone is different.
Still yours has a better finish than our motors from factory.

Verstuurd vanaf mijn D6603 met Tapatalk
 

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Love the key :) I love to see people make unique items that make the bike "theirs", regardless if its 3D printed, CAD milled or whacked out with a big hammer and some duct tape. We all have different skill levels at fabrication and differing amounts of "tool access", but anything you do just makes the bike more "yours". Love seeing some of the great ideas and creations here, as it just kick-starts my brain with ideas as well, keeping the big "circle of ideas" flowing :)
 

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Discussion Starter #948
Thanks for the kind words you guys! And thanks for the compliments on my "skills" ChopperCharles, that means a lot coming from a legend like you! When I first started doing research on these bikes, your name and bike was one of the first that I saw. In my mind, I thought you did an amazing job making everything look complete and professional, while I look at mine and still see tons of things I want to fix :p And for your new build, I know your "hammered and filed to fit" philosophy will produce another fantastic looking build!

I may have the youthful spirit, but the experience you guys have will take me years and years to attain! That's why I love how people can take whatever skills they have and make an amazing and unique machine. Like Stern said, regardless of what is used I love seeing peoples character transferred to their bikes :)
 

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Discussion Starter #949
Well after a long battle of modeling and tweaking the design to get everything to fit, I finally have the tool box designed to the best of my ability. I added places for the last few tools and made a few adjustments to the mounting points. Here is the final render:

Tool Case Final.JPG

The last step before 3D printing was to divide the component up so it would fit on my print bed. Dividing it into 2 sections was sufficient, and it is reinforced with a 1/4" aluminum rod running along the bottom of both pieces
There were some big overhanging sections, so some parts of the print are rough and will need to be sanded down, but I plan on painting the outside surface anyways so it isn't that big of a deal right now.

Top and bottom views of the 2 main sections:

20161111_221619.jpg

20161111_221633.jpg

And lastly the two hand wingnuts, the wrench tray and Allen key holder:

20161111_221730.jpg

After some initial tests, most of the tools fit nicely into their respective places, but some spots are too tight, so I used a heat gun to soften the plastic just enough to form a secure hold. Slowly coming along!
 

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Discussion Starter #950 (Edited)
Also, I just noticed this thread has reached 200,000 views!!!!!! :eek:
Thank you all for your continued interest in my build! Although it seems like I always have something else to work on and the bike will never be fully complete, I appreciate all the feedback and support! I hope you guys will continue to enjoy whatever little project I start next :D
 

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Discussion Starter #953
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Discussion Starter #955
And just what is wrong with riding a goldwing i have been doing it since,1975 3 years before the cx came out
No disrespect towards the goldwing lol, that is a great bike that has stood the test of time! Just saying it's a bit larger of a bike compared to the cx series is all. I would still love to work on a goldwing!
 

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Hahaha I referred to Micah printing everything, even large fairing like that of the Goldwing :D

Verstuurd vanaf mijn D6603 met Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter #957
It's been a while since an update, and a few things have happened to the bike.

Firstly, some disappointing news with regards to the tool box.......it does not look good on the bike lol. The biggest problem I had in designing the took box was accurately measuring the underside of the seat and frame. In order to keeps things simple, I took measurements at specified distances which allowed me to get the box to fit under the bike, but sadly it appears very blocky compared to the smooth lines of the frame. You can see in the pictures below what I mean (green tape just held it in place for now):

20161205_161310.jpg

20161205_161601.jpg

20161205_161617.jpg

Now I would rather not reprint the entire box, so I think the best option would be to round the outside of the box more and smooth the transition to the frame so that it lines up tangent to the round frame (hopefully that makes sense). However, when I looked at it and saw how much work still needed to be done on it I lost a lot of motivation, so nothing more has really happened with the tool box at the moment. I don't want to fill in the entire space with bondo, so I may end up printing "extension" pieces that I can glue onto the box to fill it out more.

So while I pondered over how to improve the looks of the box, I also looked at the bike and tried to figure out how to improve the lines of everything. Something has always been bothering me about the stance of the bike, and I figured out what it was; the headlight and mini fairing are too high. The reason they are sitting where they are right now is because of the gauges and setup I previously made. I cannot bring the fairing and headlight any lower without changing the gauges. But I wanted to see what it would look like lowered a bit, so I took off the gauges and lowered the fairing and headlight about 2.5" down the forks and I think it makes a huge difference to both the stance and lines of the bike!

Here is the before:

20161118_174216.jpg

And after lowering:

20161118_215058.jpg

Now this change isn't really needed, but I think it makes the bike look more aggressive and modern. However, there are a number of challenges that I now face if I want to keep it this way. I need to find smaller gauges, redesign mounts for them and try to get it to look natural and smooth with the rest of the bike. And this is where I have been spending most of my time the past while. Because Christmas is coming up, I was able to splurge a little bit and get the MotoGadget MotoScope Mini for my gift. I am sure most of you are familiar with this gauge, but it is an extremely tiny unit with some very handy features. Biggest to me was the fact that it has the tachometer and speedometer all in one unit, thusly removing one extra gauge. I won't have it until Christmas though, so no pictures yet. I also wanted to go digital with the temperature gauge to match the new MotoScope Mini, and I decided to go with the Koso Slim Digital Temperature Gauge because of it's tiny size. This I purchased normally so you can see it here:

20161205_202721.jpg

Lastly, I wanted to show what I've got so far for the new gauge mounting. I still have some things to do, including figuring out placement for new indicator lights, but the overall design should be similar to the final product. Note, I will still have all the function of before, just in a much smaller footprint.

Gauges V2.JPG

And that concludes this post for now. I will continue to work on the design of the mount and hopefully get back to the tool box soon enough once I have a better idea of what I want to do with it.
 
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After looking at that, my suggestion would be to not have it mounted under the seat at all.
A tube or rounded triangle shape that sits at the bottom of the open space would not detract from the over all appearance and would not draw the eye to it.
 

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Discussion Starter #960
After looking at that, my suggestion would be to not have it mounted under the seat at all.
A tube or rounded triangle shape that sits at the bottom of the open space would not detract from the over all appearance and would not draw the eye to it.
Hmmmmm, you know what, you raise a good point. For some reason it was stuck in my mind that the box had to be directly under the seat, in order to ensure that it was out of the way. However, looking at the bottom of the space and where the swing arm sits, I think you are right OCR! And now I have a crazy idea to run by you guys......what if I removed the current wheel hugger and designed a new one that doubled as a tool box?!

If you look at the third picture from the top that I recently posted, you can see that I have a fair amount of space on the swing arm in front of the current tire hugger. I could essentially fill out that space and create a smooth transition to where the current tire hugger sits.

.......the more I think about it, I actually really like the idea of having a hidden toolkit sitting there. I have to take a look at the bike, and maybe mock something up first, but I think it would blend in a lot better overall. However, so much for making less work for myself :p
 
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