Honda CX 500 Forum banner

901 - 920 of 997 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,218 Posts
Discussion Starter #902
Well it was time to start fixing the damage. I ended up reusing all of the parts because it saved me some time from reprinting and sanding. But I did add some pins in between the sections to help reinforce the connection:

20160716_144200.jpg

Then it was just a matter of attaching all the pieces back together and sanding everything smooth. Ready for paint.....again:

20160716_162355.jpg

Now comes the other question of how to mount it better. As dbjac mentioned, a piece of metal that runs along the inside and mounts to the headlight was my first choice:

20160716_180214.jpg

However this didn't end up working because there was not enough room in between the headlight and the fairing. It was too tight for even a thin sheet of metal. So option two, find a way to mount onto the headlight brackets. I ended up measuring the inside of the bottom cutouts and 3D printing a piece that I can drill and tap into:

20160717_154604.jpg

20160717_154629.jpg

I think this is the best way to ensure the fairing stays put. I will still use Velcro around the light to help with vibration and fill in the slight gap though.
I just finished putting the clear coat on the fairing today, so hopefully everything will be back to normal by the end of tomorrow!
 
  • Like
Reactions: OCR

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,966 Posts
This might be coming in too late to be of value, but there's a product from 3M called VHB double-sided tape that I've used for automotive applications, and it has proven to be basically indestructible and weatherproof. You have to use a chisel or other stout edged tool to get it loose from any surface to which you've applied it. It's fairly pricey but really does the job. I used it most recently (five years ago) to fasten the plastic logo to the rear deck (engine lid) of my '63 Corvair when the plastic pins broke off, and it was still solid as a weld when I sold the car a few months ago. Just make sure the mating surfaces are surgically clean when applying it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,116 Posts
Yup, with that 3M VHB, you basically need to use a heatgun or hairdryer on high heat for a long while to remove them after it's applied. Even then you're using quite a bit of elbow grease to remove them. GoPro mounts are also sold with the same stuff.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,218 Posts
Discussion Starter #906
Oh yes, I know of the stuff! I am a big fan haha. I've used it on things around the house before, and had it hold up to 20lbs on the wall with no problems.
The only issue using it for the fairing is I want to be able to remove the fairing easily in order to do maintenance and have access to the wiring ;) But I appreciate the suggestion all the same! If I need something stuck good then I know what stuff to use :p
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,218 Posts
Discussion Starter #907
So we have another problem <_<
I was riding along again, everything going smooth, when suddenly lost all power to everything. Yup, main fuse blown. Luckily I was close to home and was able to get a spare (now I will be keeping a few spares on my bike at all times).
Put the new fuse in and off I went, seemingly no problems. I assumed the best and didn't think much of it. Next day, out for a ride and same thing happened about halfway through the ride. This time though, after replacing the fuse as soon as I started to go it blew again. Put another one in and this time as soon as I turned on the ignition it blew. And that is where I am stuck at the moment. Ended up having to get her towed home (thank you to my parents CAA membership) and haven't touched her since because I don't want to deal with it lol.

But now I am missing the bike and want to get her running again, so what I am wondering, what is a good place to start? The weather has been hot for the past few days so I am thinking that something near the engine melted, but that doesn't narrow it down a whole lot. Just figured I would put the feelers out there and see if anyone had any suggestions or ideas. Hopefully I will start with the investigating tomorrow to find the problem.

Thanks and all the best!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
353 Posts
To take out the main fuse - it needs to pretty much be a dead short to the frame / chassis.
As its after you switch the ignition on - its on the black wire somewhere -
the usual culprits are around the headstem due to the movement - wearing / rubbing through insulation - so I'd start there -
turn off everything as a first step - the turn n lights etc to see if its in any of the individual circuits - from there its tank of and start wiggling

Rayman
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,218 Posts
Discussion Starter #910
Thanks Rayman and OCR for the tips! That was a great starting place! But the strangest thing happened......when I put in another fuse today to test it out, everything turned on with nothing seemingly out of the ordinary. So I did the first check, moved the steering around many times to see if I could get it to short again, but nothing happened. Thinking back to when it happened, I was driving straight both times it blew, so that leads me to believe it isn't a wire rubbing up front. Just to be sure though I examined all the wires that were close to the frame or a ground wire, but couldn't see anything out of the ordinary. Took off the tank and seat and examined all the wires there too, with no burnt or melted wires showing.

Next came the wire jiggling. I jiggled and wiggled every wire I could see on the bike with nothing blowing the fuse. Even more strange now.......
Tested all the electronics and everything worked fine, no issues. The only thing out of the ordinary (and maybe still not too unusual) was the wire leading to the fuse and fuse holder itself were slightly warm, but not hot.

Looking back when I was riding, both days were very hot out and I was cruising along at a decent speed, meaning the engine would have been quite warm. I am beginning to think it is something heat related as maybe once the bike had a chance to cool down, the issue goes away. However, I still have no idea what would be causing this issue and don't want to ride a lot until it is resolved. I thought it might have been the electric fan, but to my knowledge it was running fine before the fuse blew both times. So now I must ask again, any thoughts on this new development? Any of you had similar issues?

I guess the next step for now is to get the bike hot and see if I can blow the fuse again. Then I will start to disconnect different components and hopefully see what is causing the problem. I need to stock up on some fuses now!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,167 Posts
if you still have the glass fuse as your main, then remove it and switch to the automotive style blade fuse.......could be the holders for the fuse are corroded
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,218 Posts
Discussion Starter #912 (Edited)
Hey Kam, the fuse was switched to the blade style by the PO. That being said, maybe I should change it out for a different one. Looking at the leads, the one is significantly darker than the other side, almost looks burnt. Not sure if that happened before or after the fuse blew though, but could explain why the wire gets warm.

20160726_185544_1280x720.jpg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,804 Posts
I see the problem!
The wire is too small.

Get the next larger size and it will carry the load better.
It appears that the PO did not use a 30 amp holder.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,218 Posts
Discussion Starter #914
Hot diggity dog, why is it always the dumb things that get us :shame:
You think that would cause the fuse to blow though even after all this time working fine though? I'm not criticizing your diagnosis OCR, more so gaining knowledge for the future :p
I guess there is probably a lot of build up on the connectors though, which over time probably led to increased resistance and probably enough on a hot day to cause it to blow?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,804 Posts
Yes it would.
The wires on the one that I used are much larger.
I believe that they are 12gauge wire.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
353 Posts
had a case in our equipment - I instructed people to use brass or solid copper bolts on the feed into the 125A breaker - carries about 100A continuous.
Instead they used stainless bolts - which at the current in this case - dissipated about 10W of heat - into the breaker - causing it to heat up and trip earlier than it should - ie the 125A rated breaker became about a 90A breaker
due to the elevated temp -
Replace with solid copper as per original spec - problem goes away -

its the details that will get you every time !

rayman
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,218 Posts
Discussion Starter #917 (Edited)
Yes it would.
The wires on the one that I used are much larger.
I believe that they are 12gauge wire.
Awesome then, thanks for the help! It's off to the store tomorrow to pick up a higher rated holder then :) I also have some xt60 style connectors that should handle the higher amps better than the old bullet connectors so I will switch those out too.

had a case in our equipment - I instructed people to use brass or solid copper bolts on the feed into the 125A breaker - carries about 100A continuous.
Instead they used stainless bolts - which at the current in this case - dissipated about 10W of heat - into the breaker - causing it to heat up and trip earlier than it should - ie the 125A rated breaker became about a 90A breaker
due to the elevated temp -
Replace with solid copper as per original spec - problem goes away -

its the details that will get you every time !

rayman
LOL, sounds like you've dealt with this before :p
But that would help to explain why it blew on the bike when it was so hot out. I guess you learn something everyday!
 
  • Like
Reactions: chocolatelvis

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,218 Posts
Discussion Starter #918
So I made the switch to the larger gauge fuse holder (I actually had a 12 gauge one lying around that worked perfectly) and put on some xt60 connectors. I also bought a pack of 25 fuses just in case!
Anyways, hooked it all up and the bike fired up no issues. I was hesitant to get on it right away and rip around, so I let it idle in the driveway to see if anything happened and nothing did. So far so good! I threw on my gear and went for a ride around the neighborhood (only going far enough away that I was comfortable pushing the bike back home). I ended up riding for a good 30 minutes, making sure to do everything I could to try and blow the fuse and she held together!

It is a hot day too, so the bike was at 100°F most of the time with the e-fan going full speed most of the ride, so if it was heat that was going to cause it to blow, I think it would have blown by then.
I am hesitant to say the problem is completely solved until I ride for the rest of the season and it doesn't blow, but for now I can keep going a bit further until I feel confident in the bike again :p

Thanks again for the help guys, what would i do without you all!?!? :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,804 Posts
It sure does help to have many eyes looking at a problem.
Also having more years of experience with old farm equipment helps.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
225 Posts
This is one of the reasons why I love this community. Micah could have spent hours/days/weeks trying to figure out what the issue was and in one glance OCR knew what the issue was, and how to solve it.

Awesome bike buddy and glad its back running normally :happy7:
 
901 - 920 of 997 Posts
Top