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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a '79 engine No PCOIE-4915 that does not appear to have been reworked under the recall, was this engine included and if so is there a way to check if the work was done and if nessesary do it myself?
 

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what you can do is look at the engine and right next to the vin number should have 3 dots and if it does have the dots you are good to go
 

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1978 was the only year that needed the recall. After that they were all fitted with the upgraded parts and didn't need the 3 dots. You're 79 should be fine.
 

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oh damn i didnt notice the year he said.......so just forget what i said damn its to early and i am out of coffee
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Only asked because it is a '79 but was a '78 build and has a lower number on the engine than the frame, leading me to believe that the engine may have been a '78 swapped in at some point. As I stated earlier the engine did not appear to have been reworked (no 3 punch marks)so I assume all is right with it.
 

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The recall was for -78 CX (standard) model only. At that time only the standard model was available. Its model code was "CX500". The recall was for bikes (engines) up to "CX500(E) 2034366".



Your model (CX 500 Custom or Deluxe) - model code "PC01" for both - wasn´t affected. Therefore no punch marks.

B.t.w. Your engine number doesn´t make sense. It should have 7 digits in the manufacturing number. The first one tells which variant it is - distinguishing between the Custom and Deluxe)- the second one which year model (for any CX model from 0 to 4, at the most), and the last five are a plain sequence number.



Sture
 

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Mine is a 1978 and it was recalled in 1979 according to documentation. It has only two dots in front of the engine number. Guide and bracket is new style, tensioner is old flimsy type.



Michael
 

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Just to refresh, in the Quick Reference there is THIS tool for all the model years and serial numbers. Someone at one time posted a visual graphic showing how the numbers relate to what, but I could not find it. I've never heard of just the TWO dots,
 

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The full number is PC01E-2004915 on the engine and PC012005019 on the frame


The difference between engine- and frame numbers on yours is quite normal. Some bikes have exactly matching numbers, others don´t.



A 1979 CX 500 Custom it is. No recall (and punch marks) on that one!



Sture
 

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Had the same question on mine right after I got it and the forum pretty much told me to change the oil and take up any free play on the chain on a regular basis. Changing the oil is obvious, it's shared by the tranny gears and clutch plates which break down the viscosity and detergents in short order. Adjusting the chain is a bit more of a hassle having to get to the proper TDC (if you miss it, go around again) but easy enough to get down to where it's just an instinct.



On a properly maintained bike 80 - 120K miles would probably be obtainable on the chain & guide stuff providing you're feeding it the right oil on a regular basis. NEVER use one of those "Energy Saving" oils, you need one that still has a fairly high Zinc content such as the Shell Rotella diesel oil many of us run because they're much more capable of putting up with the shear forces our oil is asked to put up with.
 

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I believe that the fan is part of the camchain problem. The fan itself weighs 0,2 kg, with a lot of that weight around its circumference. Putting that kind of weight on the end of the camshaft, spinning at up to around 5000 rpm's, can surely be no good.



Every time you close the throttle the camchain will try to reduce the speed of the camshaft, and the fan will resist due to its weight, loading the tensioner and slacking at the guide side. Every time you open up the throttle the fan will also resist against this, putting a load on the camchain. This can make the camchain slam from side to side, overpowering the tensioner. Also when idling, or at certain speeds, chatter could occur.



Further on the fan robs power, and puts even more load on the camchain because of that.



I think electric is the way to go...



Just my thoughts,

Michael
 
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