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1983 Honda GL650I Silver Wing Interstates (1 Red, 1 Gray)
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been rebuilding Honda brake calipers for decades now and every time it comes to getting these pivot collars inserted into and through the new boots and the collar centered in the caliper with all four boot lips in their proper groves, I invent yet another dozen new cuss words!

Here are the parts in question:

Automotive tire Font Gas Toy Technology


If you put the pivot collar inside the caliper first and try to push the boots on over both ends, it's impossible to get the large inside lip of the boot inserted into the retaining grove in the caliper body. If you install one or both of the boots into the caliper first (as shown in the picture) and then try to push the pivot collar through the small outer lips of the boots and into the caliper... well that's darn near impossible because 1.) the outer lip is so small and you might rip the rubber boot, and 2.) the outer lip gets stuck in the grove for the boot on the other side as it's inserted and gets stuck there.

Even putting the red vegetable based rubber lube on the boot lips doesn't help all that much. That lube makes everything so slippery, it's like trying to push a noodle through a hole! And, you're supposed to put silicon brake lube on the pivot collar.

I eventually win out using a combination of methods, but it takes way too long and wears on my patience.

There has got to be an "easy" way or a trick that someone out there knows and is willing to share.

Dinner an beers for you whomever you are!
 
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1981 CX500C
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You could try a smooth tapered shaft without grooves to open the seals.
Use the pivot collar to push the tapered shaft thru.
Plenty of lube. Suggest to use brake fluid

The small end of the tapered shaft should be slightly smaller than the ID of the seals. The big end diameter should be slightly smaller than the OD of the pivot collar. The length should be a bit longer than the pivot collar length.

OR....

You could try installing one seal, then slide the pivot collar into that seal from the opposite side. Essentially install the collar from the "inside" of that seal. Pull the collar thru the seal until the opposite end is inside the caliper. Install the second seal, then push the collar back thru the 2nd seal from the inside direction. Center all.

As you know......be gentle, be firm, plenty of lube. Force is an answer, it may not be the right answer.
 

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1983 Honda GL650I Silver Wing Interstates (1 Red, 1 Gray)
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks Newt. Both good ideas. Particularly like the second one.

Should work if you can push the collar far enough into the caliper bore to clear the groove in the caliper body for the second boot.
 

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CX500EC Eurosport 1982
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Let me know if this works, same problem here, just currently accepting that boots get ripped and don’t properly fit.
 

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1982 cx500tc turbo
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Hi
I just did three set of Honda caliper's last week
I had no problems at all
Use lots of wiener slide (also known as assembly lube ) your picture looks dry missing lube
You install one boot and put the pin in all the way and then the other side
turn the pin when going thru the boot and that's all

TLD 🇨🇦 🇩🇰
 
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1982 CX500C
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I found it was much easier to install the collar by attaching it to a longer bolt. In my case, I happened to have a 1/4” x 4” full thread bolt - I threaded on a nut and washer just far enough to thread a nut only onto the other end and snugged it down. That attached the collar rigidly enough to the bolt that I gained quite a bit of leverage and was able to spin the collar as I pushed it through.

It also allowed me to liberally apply lube to the collar without getting it all over my hands.

IIRC, I also clamped the caliper to my work bench so I had both hands available for working the collar.
 

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1978 CX500 "The Grub", 1983 GL650I "Nimbus"
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Pack the inside contour of each boot with brake grease. You'll lose a little while installing the collars, but enough will remain to lubricate them.
 
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'84 CX650E that is evolving into a GL500
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You could try installing one seal, then slide the pivot collar into that seal from the opposite side. Essentially install the collar from the "inside" of that seal. Pull the collar thru the seal until the opposite end is inside the caliper. Install the second seal, then push the collar back thru the 2nd seal from the inside direction. Center all.

As you know......be gentle, be firm, plenty of lube. Force is an answer, it may not be the right answer.
That's basically how I do it, combined with what Randall said about filling them with silicone grease.
(yes I know you said brake grease but AGS sells the same silicone grease branded for brakes, rad hoses, hitch balls and a couple of other uses)
 

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That's basically how I do it, combined with what Randall said about filling them with silicone grease.
(yes I know you said brake grease but AGS sells the same silicone grease branded for brakes, rad hoses, hitch balls and a couple of other uses)
I hate greasing hitch balls. It always gets everywhere and especially on me when I'm wearing my good clothes. Someone told me the experts are now recommending to not lube them. I follow that recommendation whether right or wrong. What is your opinion on this?
 

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'84 CX650E that is evolving into a GL500
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I don't have a hitch ball so I don't have an opinion. All I know is that the stuff AGS sells for lubing them is the same as the silicone grease they sell for other applications according to the MSDS.
 

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Schmear the grease inside the coupler. Wipe off the ball each time you uncouple.

No fuss, no muss.

PS. To keep your shins healthy, remove the coupler from the receiver when not towing.
 

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Schmear the grease inside the coupler. Wipe off the ball each time you uncouple.

No fuss, no muss.

PS. To keep your shins healthy, remove the coupler from the receiver when not towing.
6 to one and half a dozen to another. Yes the grease lubricates, but it also holds dirt and debris which acts like sandpaper. To grease or not to grease!
 

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I will say that applying a bit of silicone grease inside the ends of rad hoses makes a big difference when I have to take them off in a few years...
 

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I hate greasing hitch balls. It always gets everywhere and especially on me when I'm wearing my good clothes. Someone told me the experts are now recommending to not lube them. I follow that recommendation whether right or wrong. What is your opinion on this?
The hitch ball on my truck has never been greased nor will I start now. A bit of rust is no concern to me on a trailer hitch. It's not like it's a filth wheel semi.
 

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1978 CX500 "The Grub", 1983 GL650I "Nimbus"
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PS. To keep your shins healthy, remove the coupler from the receiver when not towing.
Your shins and those of everyone else in the parking lot!
 

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Doug, greasing the inside of the coupler and wiping off the ball when uncoupled is to help keep grease off your pants.

Much easier to transfer grease to your pants from an open ball versus the inside of the coupler. Very hard to accidentally brush up against the inside of the coupler.

Sure, grease will hold dirt. Which is why these parts need to be wiped off or cleaned.

Grease on a ball hitch is debatable as to the advantage. The ball/couple joint doesn't see a large amount of rotation or fast rotation. Although, the load during towing can be very significant.

Once upon a time ago, the pioneers migrating West in the USA used wooden axles in wooden hubs greased or not with a bit of lard.

I'm pretty sure a ball/coupler hitch can survive a few hundred hours of towing without failure, either greased or not.
 

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Doug, greasing the inside of the coupler and wiping off the ball when uncoupled is to help keep grease off your pants.

Much easier to transfer grease to your pants from an open ball versus the inside of the coupler. Very hard to accidentally brush up against the inside of the coupler.

Sure, grease will hold dirt. Which is why these parts need to be wiped off or cleaned.

Grease on a ball hitch is debatable as to the advantage. The ball/couple joint doesn't see a large amount of rotation or fast rotation. Although, the load during towing can be very significant.

Once upon a time ago, the pioneers migrating West in the USA used wooden axles in wooden hubs greased or not with a bit of lard.

I'm pretty sure a ball/coupler hitch can survive a few hundred hours of towing without failure, either greased or not.
Newt, I fully understand this. I already made my opinion known. For me I see no real advantage to adding the chore of greasing the coupler and then wiping the ball off after every hook up. As a contractor I pull trailers very often and put many miles on them. I have never greased one of them and never had a failure because of no grease. I certainly have no ambition to try to change your opinion on the matter. I will also add that I have never heard of anyone having a failure because they did grease the coupler.
 

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Doug. My opinion on this topic is neutral.

I think the advantage of greasing is marginal. Myself, sometimes I use grease, sometimes I don't.

Users will do as they wish. Its kinda like a debate on "What is the best oil?" or "What is the best tire?"
 
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