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I messed up. I over-torqued and broke off the head of one of the bolts that tensions the "lifter plate" against the clutch springs. You can see the body of the bolt stuck in the stud below.I went ahead and put the spring on that broken stud and tensioned down the other three in an even, circular pattern, which tensions the fourth (broken) spring as well.

On a scale from 1-10, how stupid is this to ride? Will this cause the lifter plate to be uneven enough to do damage? Would anyone happen to have this spare part laying around?

Thanks,

201827
 

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I know intensions are good by using one but i`ve seen more bolts like this that are sheared by using a torque wrench than not using one - there seems to be a thread on here regularly showing the results.
There`s no need to use a torque wrench on anything under say, 8mm, and even then be wary.
Wrenches may be inaccurate at the low level required for 6mm, oil on threads will throw the settings out, tired threads on parts etc can all contribute to a stripped thread or broken fixing.
There`s probably only 4 areas on a CX engine that need a torque wrench, go by feel if you can.
 

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I vote for trying to turn it with a dental pick or other thin, sharp object.

And in spite of what has been said in this thread, use a torque wrench.

The main causes of people breaking bolts with torque wrenches are
1) Not setting the wrench properly. If you are unfamiliar with torque wrenches read the instructions and practice by clamping a nut in your vise and tightening a bolt into it.
2) Using a torque wrench that is not suitable for the job. Like anything with a scale on it, torque wrenches are most accurate near the middle of the scale. The torque values specified for these bikes cover too wide a range for a single wrench to be accurate over the range required so you really need 3 of them, a 1/4" drive (used mostly for M6 screws & nuts), a 3/8" drive one (you will use this for most fasteners) and a 1/2" drive for things like the clutch nut, flywheel nut &c.
There is no excuse for anyone in the US not to have all 3. Harbor Freight almost always has a coupon on their website that allows you to purchase them for $9.99 each
3) Assuming that the wrench size is the same as the fastener size and tightening to the torque specified for the head size. The size of a fastener is determined by the diameter of the shank of the bolt. The bolt you broke is an M6 (6mm diameter) with a 10mm head and most of the ones that hold the engine cases together are M6 with 8mm heads. They all need the same torque (note that there are a few M6 screws inside the engine that require different torque but the torque for them is always specified in the section of the Factory Shop Manual that covers that part of the engine).

BTW: Welcome to the forum. Please add your location to your profile and your bike's model and model year to your signature so that you don't have to remember to tell us every time and we don't have to keep asking when you forget (see Forum Settings link in my signature).

And welcome to the world of antique vehicle ownership (they own us, not the other way around). Your bike is about 4 decades old and the Previous Owners may or may not have done the maintenance necessary to keep it safe & reliable so it is highly recommended to download the Factory Shop Manual for your model (available through the CX Wiki - link in my signature) and go through all of the service procedures, regardless of whether your bike has reached the specified mileage.
I also recommend looking on all rubber parts with suspicion because rubber does not age gracefully. Check the date codes on your tires and replace them if they are over 5 years old no matter how good they look & feel because old rubber simply cannot flow around the irregularities in the asphalt well enough to grip, especially if it is cool or wet. If your bike still has the original rubber brake line(s) (should be replaced every 2 or 3 fluid changes = 5 or 6 years) I recommend shopping for modern stainless braided ones (they last practically forever and double the life of the fluid).
 

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I know intensions are good by using one but i`ve seen more bolts like this that are sheared by using a torque wrench than not using one - there seems to be a thread on here regularly showing the results.
There`s no need to use a torque wrench on anything under say, 8mm, and even then be wary.
Wrenches may be inaccurate at the low level required for 6mm, oil on threads will throw the settings out, tired threads on parts etc can all contribute to a stripped thread or broken fixing.
There`s probably only 4 areas on a CX engine that need a torque wrench, go by feel if you can.
For an inexperienced mechanic who hasn't developed the "feel," that would be poor advice.
Most over tightening with a torque wrench happens when the head size, rather than the shank diameter is used to reference the tension value. (Inexperienced mechanics, remember?) Once that error is addressed, even an inexpensive torque wrench will be decently reliable.
Plus, the only way to develop a proper "feel" is to use a torque wrench enough to know what a given tension feels like.
You are correct that accuracy declines at the extremes of a wrench's range, so I recommend an inch-pound wrench below about 15 ft-lbs.

Randall
 

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Even when using a torque wrench you can feel if it`s not going well, threads start to stretch. Only experience will tell you to stop.
The temptation is to just keep on going - after all you`re using the correct tool, it`s got to be right, hasn`t it...........?
Nah, torque wrenches cause more problems than they`re worth sometimes, the evidence is written throughout this forum.
 

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Even when using a torque wrench you can feel if it`s not going well, threads start to stretch. Only experience will tell you to stop.
I never said that feel wasn't important. If it feels wrong, stop and reset the wrench. But a person will never learn to gauge tension by feel without some context.

Randall
 

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I agree with everyone on this. How's that for wishy washy?

I have a 1/4 inch drive torque wrench calibrated in inch pound and this is what should be used on stuff like this.

But sometimes even with a torque wrench you can feel that "I should stop now". If you don't feel the decrease rather than an increase in effort something is going to give. We don't always know what has been overtightened in a past life.

Some things are torque critical but that case bolt that felt funny? Leave it unless you want to be helicoiling it. Set the wrench to a lower setting, see what torque has been achieved and judge if the assembly can get away with it.
 

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I would remove the clutch housing and then set it up in a drill press , properly clamped down and drill a suitable sized hole into the broken stud.

Then I would drive in a Torx-drive driver bit - this is where the suitable sized drill bit is important-with gentle hammer taps , attach a tapping wrench handle and turn the wee beasty out .

I would not use a tapered Ezi-out - you will make a hash of it for sure.

You are going to have to remove the clutch housing to replace it anyway , so give it a crack ;-)
 

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Unfortunately I can't see your photo. But here is another option I've used successfully on another Honda clutch:
There is a simple and a short hole on some of the clutch baskets exactly opposite the threaded hole on the back. I have drilled a 5mm (3/16th) hole from the back. When it contacted the broken bolt, the drill grabbed and unscrewed the remains out of the front.
I then tapped the thread a bit deeper from the front, because I noticed that the bolt had actually broken because it ran out of thread and had jammed...

Cheers,
Joe
 
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