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Every time I replace the fuse on my GL650, which I'm hotwiring, but the way the manual says, which is basically using jumper wires to connect the wires, and the fuse for the brakes blows, I replace it, and it blows, replace, blown.... Tried using a wire, touched it to both sided of the fuse, and it got hot quickly so I took it off. Even if the wires to the lights aren't hooked up to the harness it blows... Any ideas? I'm REALLY hoping to have it on the road for her first test ride tonight or tomorrow for the Gilmore meet, but that doesn't look likely...
 

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Every time I replace the fuse on my GL650, which I'm hotwiring, but the way the manual says, which is basically using jumper wires to connect the wires, and the fuse for the brakes blows, I replace it, and it blows, replace, blown.... Tried using a wire, touched it to both sided of the fuse, and it got hot quickly so I took it off. Even if the wires to the lights aren't hooked up to the harness it blows... Any ideas? I'm REALLY hoping to have it on the road for her first test ride tonight or tomorrow for the Gilmore meet, but that doesn't look likely...


Could be a couple of things. Maybe both of your wires are hot (12 volts power) and rigged incorrectly. Most Honda ground circuits are green wires to the frame or a cluster of them to a frame or bolt. Check you service manual for the correct color coding on the wires to make sure it is hooked into the correct harness. Then take a multi-meter and check voltage from each wire to ground. If you get 12 volts from each wire to ground, then both are hot and you have the wiring plugged into the wrong harness connector. If one is 12 volts and the other is zero volts, then the connection is correct (on hot and one ground). Next, trace your hot wire (12 volt) and make sure it is not chaffed and touching any bare metal anywhere up the harness. Check around the frame tubes, brackets and mounts where the wiring may have rubbed through from normal movement. Your brake switch is nothing more than a ground switch. Whenever the brake pedal or lever is pushed, the contacts close and complete the lamp circuit to ground lighting the brake lamp bulb. Find the short circuit and fix it properly. DO NOT TRY TO TEMPORARILY FIX IT WITH A STRAIGHT WIRE, HIGHER AMP FUSE OR OTHER CONTRAPTION!!! The wiring will simply melt and catch fire. I don't think you would do that, however, I have seen that in the past. Melting wiring is a distinctive odor.
 
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