Honda CX 500 Forum banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
138 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I'm swapping around fork tubes, changing seals, etc. but have hit a snag.

The allen headed bolt that threads into and then holds the fork piston won't seem to catch the threads. It just spins when I try to tighten it.

The only thing I can think of is that I should first put the springs and fork caps back on to provide downward pressure. This would possibly keep the lower components from rotating.

Does that sound correct? is there a different technique? the shop manual didn't discuss assembly
204734
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,522 Posts
Yes, you can use the spring pressure to provide the downward pressure required to start the bolt. Be sure to clean the threads at the end of the tube before assembly. After starting the bolt, I don't trust this method to ensure full torque. I use a long piece of conduit with a hex head bolt welded into the end ( the bolt head should only just fit into the tube). The bolt head helps prevent rotation of the tube in the leg when pressed into the bottom of the tube to allow proper torque to be applied. A bit of blue thread lock would also be advisable. Hope that helps.
Dan
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
21,251 Posts
Push the damper rod down the fork with a wooden dowel. Half inch should do it.

It will both push the rod to the bottom and prevent it from turning when the bolt is tightened.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
If you can beg, borrow or buy an impact driver that usually does it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
I know but an impact gun will (very often) tighten a bolt that's slipping like that. it sort of takes it by surprise and tightens it before it can slip.
I've done it loads of times.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
138 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
thanks all. i'm still in process of dis-assembling and re-assembling. I have two sets of forks, one from a standard GL500 (single disk) and one from an interstate (double disk). The original fork Standard tubes had some pitting and the left seal was leaking, so I'm trying to mix and match to get the best tubes back on the bike with fresh seals.

I'm able to get all of the lower bolts loosened, but often they won't come all the way out, so I can't then remove the fork tubes. I get a hard stop when trying to get the seal out using the fork tube

I've got broom handle to apply pressure

Argh
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
The seals need quite a force to knock them out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
138 Posts
Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
The seals need quite a force to knock them out.
Update - All the lower bolts and damper rods are now out using a combination of broom handle, vise grips, workmate, impact wrench, and socket wrench.

The two seals & fork uppers from the Standard came out easily on basically the first try by hand, but the Interstate ones are being difficult. I'll try using the triple tree to hold one end and check Partzilla to see if there's any differences in the internals.

Update#2 - Turns out the solution for the stubborn fork seals was the ever popular heat 'em up and yank down hard. Put the fork in a triple tree, set a heat gun on it's almost hottest setting, get the seal area of the fork good and hot to loosen up the 38 year old seals and expand the aluminum, then yank down really hard a few times. Now I can pick and choose the best parts and install fresh seals.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top