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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well, it happened. I thought my new purchase was too good to be true. I have really enjoyed by 'new' old Silverwing. Had it for a couple of weeks and put 500+ miles on it so far. Been having a blast. When I got it I was not yet aware of the forum's checklist to work through before putting too many miles on a resuscitated machine. I thought I was doing good to change the oil and filter immediately, then again and again for 200 miles. Crankcase is looking good. Topped off the brake fluid. Plans to change the final drive gear oil. Today after a short 10 mile ride, upon arriving home (thank God), I applied the front brake to slow for driveway entry. Brake worked fine for the stop, but remained locked. Looks like the calipers may be stuck. Took the Master cylinder off and clean the Trash out of it as best I could. It feels like it is working fine. Attempting to clean the lines, I seem to be having problems getting fluid to free-flow to the calipers.



Should I take the time to dismantle the calipers and clean their 'inerds' while I am at it? I would assume so. Brake pads look okay. Is there a best way to accomplish the task at hand? Can I clean the inside of the calipers with brake cleaner spray? And finally, is there a best easy to reprime the brake lines to speed the bleed process?



Any and all advice is very much appreciated!



Bike is an '81 GL500 Silverwing. Ony 23,xxx miles. Ridden only 500 miles over the past 8 years. I received it with 8 year old oil and likely same fluids all around from the first owner more than 8 years old. Love my bike and want to care for her properly.
 

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The 1st thing I would do is take off the Master Cylinder as it's quicker.There's a very tiny vent hole at the bottom of them.If this get blocked it can cause your symptoms.



I clean mine with a blast of WD40 type stuff,Then some

Carb/Brake cleaner and then high pressure Air blow out.If you can get a nylon brush bristle down there you can poke it through the small hole if possible.There's no point attacking the callipers if the MC is at fault.



To get pressure back into the MC/System click here,



http://globalcxglvtwins.hostingdelivered.com/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=315
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Shep, thanks for the reply. I will have a go at your procedural recommendation in the morning. I went ahead and dismantled the calipers ( mostly for the experience ). The were a little cruddy. Cleaned them up pretty well. Polished the pistons with a very light application of 0000 steel wool. They now look nice. Following a general cleaning, I have everything put back together. When the sun comes up, I will be out applying your procedure.



Historically, I have been a little paranoid about doing my own work, but this forum does an amazing job of educating us newbies. Following reading for several hours, I now feel perfectly comfortable doing what ever. You guys are all amazing and appreciated very much.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Update.... Well, I can say I am more familiar with the front brake system now. Completely dismantled the calipers, cleaned thoroughly them. Reassembled. No extra parts, and that is a good thing, right? As noted above, I was having problems bleeding the brakes. Could not seem to get fluid to flow. Used the technique described in the link provided by Shep and had it all back together in no time ( 30 - 45 minutes ) working at a casual pace. Single remaining issue is that I can not get the left front caliper to bleed. Removed the bleed port to verify that it was not occluded. It was not. Followed repeated pumping of the brake, still no fluid. I removed the hose adapter from the caliper inlet. Pumped the brake. No fluid. I used a guitar string to verify the wheel end of the hose was not occluded. Difficulty was encountered with feeding the wire up the brake line. Then I pumped the brake several times. With the hose I noted that the wheel end of the hose would straighten out slightly with the line pressurized. I think that is my confirmation that the distal end of the brake line i, in fact, occluded. There was some 'sludge' in the brake system from the deterioration of the brake fluid that was known to be 8+ years old when I bought the bike.



Could this 'sludge' material have gravitated and wedged in the distal end of the brake line? Any recommendations on clearing the line, or might it be simpler to just replace the front brake lines?
 

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Sometimes the brake lines start to break up internally. The blockage could be a piece of free floating inner lining or a 'flap' still attached to the inner brake line.



This flap [if present] can also cause brakes to remain on after release - which is where you came in so I'd be pretty suspect on the lines at this point.



Maybe time for a new set of braideds?
 

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Not often you see the word "occluded" used. For the layman, it means blockage. Continued good luck, sir!
 

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Sometimes the lines can become blocked with crud. My preference would be to replace them with high quality stainless steel braided lines, see this thread.



A couple of my bikes have the JDA lines installed. Highly recommended.
 

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I agree.Replace the lines.Both my CX have steel braided lines.I have an old set of the synthetic rubber ones and they are very very spongy and should throw them away but you you never know<grin>




PS

It's nice not to have 30+ year old brake lines
 

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In terms of this forum, I think I'd use 'blocked with crud' instead of 'occluded'. For purposes of this forum, what's a 'layman'? Non-preacher? Non-English teacher? Non-mechanic? Non-vocabulary snob?
 

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In terms of this forum, distal would equate to a thread jack. And, for the record, a layman would be anyone not getting all tied up in knots when words are disassociated with a particular topic. Unless, of course, a sense of humor wryly hidden is the motive. EH?




Now back to your regularly scheduled conundrums.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
You guys are too funny!
 

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I lived in a conundrum for a while but I couldn't stand it, I need to be more distal from my neighbors. I didn't like it when I could hear them belch and fart and drop their boots. EH for sure.

 

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If you find a job in Jeopardy, Shep, make sure you look in the tank, cuz that's where they said the economy is.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Ordered new front brake lines from JDA this afternoon. Thanks for the recommendation guys!
 

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Remember to check the pins that the calliper slides on too, I've found these are also a common cause of brakes sticking on.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Thanks! Addressed all the issues and now the brakes are fine.
 

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I agree.Replace the lines.Both my CX have steel braided lines.I have an old set of the synthetic rubber ones and they are very very spongy and should throw them away but you you never know<grin>




PS

It's nice not to have 30+ year old brake lines


Shep, any recommendations for good (tight old git requirements) brake lines in UK. Am considering using brakes for more than final stopping and hill starts
PS. For a custom single caliper set up.
 
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