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Since electrons travel on the surface of a conductor, would it be to any advantage, to use a brass tube rather than a rod?
This is also the theory behind stranded wire v. single wire.

EJ
 

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This is also the theory behind stranded wire v. single wire.
No, stranded wire is more common because it's more flexible than a solid wire of the same gauge.
 

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I've been working with electrical/electronic circuits for many years and never heard that electrons only flow on the surface of a conductor. In any case, since the current in ignition wires is relatively small, a tube would probably suffice. But I agree with Doug-- contact is likely better with a solid rod if the ends are cut correctly.
 

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OK. I misspoke. Electrical energy flows on the spaces, outside of the wires. That's why audiophiles use wires with many, many strands of wire, when connecting the battery to their amplifiers, etc.

But, I understand the question of the spring seating to the 'tube'.

Also, I opened up my plug caps, tonight. And, measured the aluminum rod and resistor. It measured 2.135, not the 2.170 like all the info I've read, recently.
I do get spring resistance, when reinstalling. So, I'm sure there's contact with all the components. BTW, everything was remarkably clean. I think someone has changed caps, in the not-too-distant past.

EJ
 

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OK. I misspoke. Electrical energy flows on the spaces, outside of the wires. That's why audiophiles use wires with many, many strands of wire, when connecting the battery to their amplifiers, etc.

But, I understand the question of the spring seating to the 'tube'.

Also, I opened up my plug caps, tonight. And, measured the aluminum rod and resistor. It measured 2.135, not the 2.170 like all the info I've read, recently.
I do get spring resistance, when reinstalling. So, I'm sure there's contact with all the components. BTW, everything was remarkably clean. I think someone has changed caps, in the not-too-distant past.

EJ
I still think you’re mistaken or misinformed. Strands are used when it needs to be flexible. The electricity is running through the copper not the space.
 

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Copper atoms hold on to their outside electrons loosely. These outer electrons can move from one copper atom to the next. They move like this when pushed by electrons from adjacent atoms.
Compare the resistance of different sized conductors. Is the resistance proportional to surface area or to volume?
 

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I still think you’re mistaken or misinformed. Strands are used when it needs to be flexible. The electricity is running through the copper not the space.
To my knowledge all household wiring (romex) is 3 solid Cu wires.

very basic but pretty accurate
Any conductor (thing that electricity can go through) is made of atoms. Each atom has electrons in it. If you put new electrons in a conductor, they will join atoms, and each atom will spit out an electron to the next atom. This next atom takes in the electron and spits out another one on the other side.
 

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OK. I misspoke. Electrical energy flows on the spaces, outside of the wires. That's why audiophiles use wires with many, many strands of wire, when connecting the battery to their amplifiers, etc.
The "skin effect" (tendency of high frequency alternating current to flow on the outer surface of the conductor) is well known but the frequency needs to be really high before the effect becomes significant. Wave guides for microwave energy are usually hollow (& often square or rectangular) but at the 60 HZ typical of electrical power in your home the effect is negligible.

The signal from an ignition coil that causes the plug to spark is not AC but actually a series of DC spikes so this principle is not really applicable to the ignition system.

BTW: Speaking as someone who worked in the engineering departments of speaker manufacturers for many years I can tell you that those expensive so-called "special" speaker cables are another way to make people that don't understand the physics of how things work pay more for something that doesn't make a significant difference, right up there with "pampering" your GL500 with "premium" fuel because it has to be better if it costs more.
Or any other brand of snake oil.

We had been telling people that ordinary 16 gauge lamp cord was the best thing to use for speakers for decades before those expensive cables first came on the market and those who understand the physics and electrical theory still do. I remember one particular line of cables that were made of many individually insulated (lacquered) strands braided together because (their advertising claimed) the capacitance of conductors that ran parallel to each other like lamp cord was a terrible thing and could short out the higher frequencies of the audio signal.
They weren't on the market long before reports began to surface (no pun intended) of the of those cables causing the output stages of some amplifiers that had particularly good high frequency reproduction to burn out because of the low impedance at higher frequencies caused by the somewhat higher capacitance caused by their construction.
 

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Bob,

I have no electronics degree but have always like audio as a hobby and work in the AV industry currently. I have read similar things about the skin effect at high frequencies and would agree it doesn't apply to the ignition system of our bikes.

As far as "Audiophile" snake oil, OMG! Fools are just dying to be separated from their money! Just look at any "high end" audio catalog and see all the inconsequential items that sell for crazy money! For example: $1,500 cryo treated AC power cords, $300 silver plated contact AC wall outlets, $5,000 speaker cables (were $20,000), multi hundred dollar speaker cable elevators (to keep your speaker wire off the floor), they are claimed to lower noise, increase dynamics, remove haze, and open up the top octaves, etc., etc. I could go on but won't. Everyone can spend their disposable income (key word here is disposable) anyway they want...

Rant over :D
 

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My 1st Generation Chevy Colorado used beryllium copper tube with a spring delete in all five spark plug boots. Each plug had a coil pack. A noticeable improvement in power, throttle and mpg. from 355nation.
 

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That's because you replaced a dinky stainless steel spring with a larger copper conductor. The larger copper tube has lower resistance and won't bounce around like a spring will.
 

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Deleted my overly simplistic comment.
 

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Bob,

I have no electronics degree but have always like audio as a hobby and work in the AV industry currently. I have read similar things about the skin effect at high frequencies and would agree it doesn't apply to the ignition system of our bikes.

As far as "Audiophile" snake oil, OMG! Fools are just dying to be separated from their money! Just look at any "high end" audio catalog and see all the inconsequential items that sell for crazy money! For example: $1,500 cryo treated AC power cords, $300 silver plated contact AC wall outlets, $5,000 speaker cables (were $20,000), multi hundred dollar speaker cable elevators (to keep your speaker wire off the floor), they are claimed to lower noise, increase dynamics, remove haze, and open up the top octaves, etc., etc. I could go on but won't. Everyone can spend their disposable income (key word here is disposable) anyway they want...

Rant over :D
You remind me of the Danny DiVito film Ruthless People. Judge Reinhold works in a audio store where his job depends on up-selling fools. At one point he has a fish on the line but then sees his pregnant wife and says that the much cheaper line is more than he needs. A GREAT comedy if ya'll might have missed it.
 

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This was an interesting topic so I did a little googling on it. I was an electrical engineer for 44 years and am still an amateur radio operator so this topic in not foreign to me.
Bob's description is on the money although it really does not apply to wave guides - those are electromagnetic waves traveling through space.

Everything you never cared about the Skin Effect:


And I believe brass rod or brass tube would make no difference to the current delivered to the spark plug. As pointed out, its how good an electrical contact is made that you care about.
 
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