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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This is something that the Honda dealer did for me the first time but I had noticed it was just a little rougher after he did it. I suspect he didn't let the bike cool down completely before he did them since I rode it there and picked it up after lunch.



Anyway, this is the first time I've ever done them myself and I've got a couple of noob questions:



1) How do I know whether I'm on the compression stroke or not? I've removed the inspection covers and rotated the engine (clockwise) while observing the the TR and TL marks rotate by. I can set it exactly but how do I know I'm on the proper stroke?



2) My valves barely move when I shake them. Is that normal? They appear to be too tight to get a .003 feeler gauge into the gap.



After the screwup two days ago with the kill switch I'm a little leery of messing something else up. Still, this is something I've got to learn.
 

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Well the answer to the first question that isn't numbered is. You don't adjust the valves on a hot engine. It needs to be bone cold. Sit it overnight and do it in the morning. Metal expands and contracts so that's probably what the honda dealer did.





To find tdc get yourself a T handled allen or screwdriver. Something solid that doesn't have bits that will fall off.





You will be able to watch it go up and down and know exactly where you are.



Your valves may not be at the right point in tdc. Some times it takes a bit to find where they actually clack.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Well the answer to the first question that isn't numbered is. You don't adjust the valves on a hot engine. It needs to be bone cold. Sit it overnight and do it in the morning. Metal expands and contracts so that's probably what the honda dealer did.





To find tdc get yourself a T handled allen or screwdriver. Something solid that doesn't have bits that will fall off.





You will be able to watch it go up and down and know exactly where you are.



Your valves may not be at the right point in tdc. Some times it takes a bit to find where they actually clack.




So they're supposed to clack on the compression stroke? As for finding top dead center, I've inserted a screwdriver and just let it get pushed up and down. It basically just mimics the markings on the flywheel (I guess that's the flywheel).



My engine is stone cold. I haven't started it since I broke the kill switch two days ago other than to confirm the switch still worked (after a fashion).
 

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jay,just a few tips to add to what don said.

the driver in the pot will indicate where the piston is and which direction its travelling.it wont tell you which stroke you are on.so,as the piston starts to rise,take the driver out and replace it with your finger.you will be under NO doubt as to the commpression stroke.



when turning the front 17mm nut...if you miss your marks....do NOT go backwards if you,set your socket to tighten,and dont change it.



when you set the left hand pot up correct.adjust your cam chain[3 minute job].
 

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Chapter 3, page 4, in the Drop I.O. link.



Watch your intake valves when rotating the crank and when they close prior to TDC, your on a compression stroke.



Like Bandit said you can "feel" the air with your finger on the compression stroke. Just run it through the cycles with



the crank a few times and you will then pick it up easily.



Bandits link above is excellent.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I think I finally figured out what was happening. I was unable to get my finger in the spark plug hole since I have a combination of big hand and short fingers. Then I had an epiphany. Apparently there was very little movement to be seen or heard at the rocker arms. With the cylinder head at TDC, it had to be either on the compression stroke or the exhaust stroke. Both valve sets should be slightly movable on the compression stroke. So then it was just a matter of going to TDC twice in a row and each time feeling for movement of the rocker arms. One allowed movement; one did not. So I set the intake at .003" and the exhaust at .004" when at TDC and the rockers could be moved slightly. Does this sound right?



I believe my exhaust valves were probably within tolerances but that my intakes were too tight.



I've only done the left side so far until someone tells me I've got it right. Then I'll go ahead and do the cam adjustment and the right side and button it back up.



The HID kit showed up. I may tackle that next. But first....
 

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I believe you have it figured out, Jay. Now just adjust the cam tensioner, and move to the right cylinder. If you have only turned the front inspection bolt clockwise to TDC, you should be good to just loosen the adjuster nut a couple of turns and tap the bolt head with a hammer handle to ensure that the adjuster can move. If you have achieved TDC by rotating the crankshaft even a bit in the counterclockwise direction, you have tensioned the chain on the the adjuster side and slackened it on the other side. It will not be able to move the chain to proper adjustment as the tensioner spring cannot overcome the cam or the crank. So, if you are a little off, make sure the final rotation is clockwise to line up the TDC mark.
 

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So then it was just a matter of going to TDC twice in a row and each time feeling for movement of the rocker arms. One allowed movement; one did not. So I set the intake at .003" and the exhaust at .004" when at TDC and the rockers could be moved slightly. Does this sound right?


That's exactly what I do Jay.



Setting the valves, the tappets should grip that guage pretty tight. Just contacting it is to loose. You'll have woodpeckers between your knees if you set that way.
 

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Every once in a while I run across one that you wonder who did the job last. There was one with a longer tappet screw in it and it was cranked down as far as the others except it was 1/8 or more past where it should have been so the valve was pretty much always open. It's about time I should probably do my tappets again. Or at least a quick refresher. Then again I may have did them 2 months ago when I adjusted the cam chain. Cant remember.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Every once in a while I run across one that you wonder who did the job last. There was one with a longer tappet screw in it and it was cranked down as far as the others except it was 1/8 or more past where it should have been so the valve was pretty much always open. It's about time I should probably do my tappets again. Or at least a quick refresher. Then again I may have did them 2 months ago when I adjusted the cam chain. Cant remember.






Well, mine were definitely out of whack a little bit although the bike seemed to run well. I do remember it was smoother before the valves were adjusted by the dealer but it was a slight thing. Now I guess I know why. In any case I've learned a new skill and won't be afraid to tackle this in the future.



The bike cranked right up when I tried it after closing everything up. I would have loved to have taken it for a ride but that damned broken kill switch causes the entire throttle pipe to want to slide off the handlebar. I can't ride it until the replacement shows up.



I still have two projects I ought to finish: the HID kit and doing as much of the heated grip install as I can.
 
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