Honda CX 500 Forum banner
1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Premium Member
1978 CX500 "The Grub", 1983 GL650I "Nimbus"
Joined
·
12,431 Posts
I've had the same idea, but never researched it. You'll have to open a parts fiche and compare the internal assemblies.
 

·
Premium Member
1978 CX500 "The Grub", 1983 GL650I "Nimbus"
Joined
·
12,431 Posts
If you're thinking to put the GL500 lowers on your '82 CX forks for dual discs, note that the axle attachment is totally different. The change would have an impact on trail and handling.
 

·
Registered
1982 Honda cx500c
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
If you're thinking to put the GL500 lowers on your '82 CX forks for dual discs, note that the axle attachment is totally different. The change would have an impact on trail and handling.
Nope, the other way around, gl forks in cx lowers, not trying to get dual disc brakes.

I'm wanting to know if the two connect the same way in the lower part.
 

·
Super Moderator
'84 CX650E that is evolving into a GL500
Joined
·
18,903 Posts
Welcome to the forum. Please add your location and your bike's model and model year to your profile so that you don't have to remember to tell us every time and we don't have to keep asking when you forget (see Forum Settings link in my signature).

And welcome to the world of antique vehicle ownership (they own us, not the other way around). Your bike is about 4 decades old and may or may not have had all of the maintenance necessary to keep it safe & reliable so it is highly recommended to download the Factory Shop Manual for your model (available through the CX Wiki - link in my signature) and go through all of the service procedures, regardless of whether your bike has reached the specified mileage.
I also recommend looking on all rubber parts with suspicion because rubber does not age gracefully. Check the date codes on your tires and replace them if they are over 5 years old no matter how good they look & feel (old rubber simply cannot flow around the irregularities in the asphalt well enough to grip, especially if it is cool or wet). If your bike still has the original rubber brake line(s) (should be replaced every 2 or 3 fluid changes = 5 or 6 years) I recommend shopping for modern stainless braided ones (they last practically forever and double the life of the fluid). And don't forget things like the rad hoses and the boot between the engine and swingarm (they can crack on the bottom where you don't see it).

The best advice anyone can give you about customizing any vehicle is to get it safe & reliable in more or less original condition and use it for a while before you start making any changes so it can tell you what changes it needs to make it do what you want/need better. That approach almost always results in something you actually want to keep and use but making changes based on style or on what someone else (who may or may not really understand how the changes affect the way it works) has done often results in a piece of expensive yard art that you can't stand sitting on for more than a few minutes and might even be dangerous.

Changing the forks is a good example of that and asking on the forum shows that you are thinking about the effects and trying to keep it working right instead of making changes and finding out the hard way.

If I'm reading you right you want to replace the sliders on your GL500 with ones from an '82 CX500C (they are different from the forks of other CX500 models). Both models have 35mm diameter stanchions so it would be possible to assemble working forks using parts from both but (as Randall mentioned) the GL500's axle is centred on its sliders while the CX500C's axle is mounted in front of its sliders.
The "C" in Honda model numbers stands for "factory Custom", which means "styled to look like a chopper". Choppers generally have elongated forks at often silly rake angles, resulting in trail that is increased enough to make it difficult to steer at low speeds (not to mention "chopper flop"). Honda's engineers located the axle ahead of the forks to allow the rake that the style required while maintaining a more reasonable trail for decent handling.

What that means to you is that if you use Custom sliders on your SilverWing the trail will be decreased. Low speed steering could become twitchy and it would not be as stable at highway speeds.
 

·
Registered
1982 Honda cx500c
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
Welcome to the forum. Please add your location and your bike's model and model year to your profile so that you don't have to remember to tell us every time and we don't have to keep asking when you forget (see Forum Settings link in my signature).

And welcome to the world of antique vehicle ownership (they own us, not the other way around). Your bike is about 4 decades old and may or may not have had all of the maintenance necessary to keep it safe & reliable so it is highly recommended to download the Factory Shop Manual for your model (available through the CX Wiki - link in my signature) and go through all of the service procedures, regardless of whether your bike has reached the specified mileage.
I also recommend looking on all rubber parts with suspicion because rubber does not age gracefully. Check the date codes on your tires and replace them if they are over 5 years old no matter how good they look & feel (old rubber simply cannot flow around the irregularities in the asphalt well enough to grip, especially if it is cool or wet). If your bike still has the original rubber brake line(s) (should be replaced every 2 or 3 fluid changes = 5 or 6 years) I recommend shopping for modern stainless braided ones (they last practically forever and double the life of the fluid). And don't forget things like the rad hoses and the boot between the engine and swingarm (they can crack on the bottom where you don't see it).

The best advice anyone can give you about customizing any vehicle is to get it safe & reliable in more or less original condition and use it for a while before you start making any changes so it can tell you what changes it needs to make it do what you want/need better. That approach almost always results in something you actually want to keep and use but making changes based on style or on what someone else (who may or may not really understand how the changes affect the way it works) has done often results in a piece of expensive yard art that you can't stand sitting on for more than a few minutes and might even be dangerous.

Changing the forks is a good example of that and asking on the forum shows that you are thinking about the effects and trying to keep it working right instead of making changes and finding out the hard way.

If I'm reading you right you want to replace the sliders on your GL500 with ones from an '82 CX500C (they are different from the forks of other CX500 models). Both models have 35mm diameter stanchions so it would be possible to assemble working forks using parts from both but (as Randall mentioned) the GL500's axle is centred on its sliders while the CX500C's axle is mounted in front of its sliders.
The "C" in Honda model numbers stands for "factory Custom", which means "styled to look like a chopper". Choppers generally have elongated forks at often silly rake angles, resulting in trail that is increased enough to make it difficult to steer at low speeds (not to mention "chopper flop"). Honda's engineers located the axle ahead of the forks to allow the rake that the style required while maintaining a more reasonable trail for decent handling.

What that means to you is that if you use Custom sliders on your SilverWing the trail will be decreased. Low speed steering could become twitchy and it would not be as stable at highway speeds.
I have an 82 cx500 custom that is in show room condition. I want to keep my cx500 custom sliders. I have been thinking about using fork tubes from a gl500. Will it work? Please if anyone knows.

Not going to have wheel flop by adding 2.365". As far as trail and ride 2 miles down the road I'm sure I'll get used to it. Just wondering if anybody can give me an answer on my question without all the usual warnings and or any shaming. All my info is already in my profile!

Thanks for the welcome!
 

·
Super Moderator
'84 CX650E that is evolving into a GL500
Joined
·
18,903 Posts
OK, so what you actually want to do is replace your CX600C's stanchions with ones from a GL500? If that is the case, as long as they are about the same length the handling shouldn't change.

BTW: 2.365"/61mm (I'm not sure where you got that number but it sounds close) of trail doesn't sound like much but it would be about a 60% increase or decrease and that is definitely significant.

FWIW, when I attached a sidecar to my GL1100 its 5.3"/135mm trail made the steering very heavy compared to the outfits I'd had previously that all had trail close to 4"/100mm. I lived with it for a few years while I investigated ways to reduce the trail (this is a common modification for bikes with sidecars but can be very expensive). In the end I decided to change to leading axle fork sliders from a different model, which I figure reduced the trail by about 30-35mm and made it much easier to steer.
 

·
Registered
1982 Honda cx500c
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
OK, so what you actually want to do is replace your CX600C's stanchions with ones from a GL500? If that is the case, as long as they are about the same length the handling shouldn't change.

BTW: 2.365"/61mm (I'm not sure where you got that number but it sounds close) of trail doesn't sound like much but it would be about a 60% increase or decrease and that is definitely significant.

FWIW, when I attached a sidecar to my GL1100 its 5.3"/135mm trail made the steering very heavy compared to the outfits I'd had previously that all had trail close to 4"/100mm. I lived with it for a few years while I investigated ways to reduce the trail (this is a common modification for bikes with sidecars but can be very expensive). In the end I decided to change to leading axle fork sliders from a different model, which I figure reduced the trail by about 30-35mm and made it much easier to steer.
Well, if stanchions=fork tubes, then yes we understand each other. Except that maybe you meant cx500c and not cx600c.

Again, I'm not so much worried about the handling, I just want to know if it will all bolt together. Mainly the lower section.
 

·
Super Moderator
'84 CX650E that is evolving into a GL500
Joined
·
18,903 Posts
Some call the inner part the tube, others call the outer part the tube and still others call them upper and lower tubes so it can get confusing. I prefer to call them by their proper names of stanchion (inner) and slider (outer) to avoid confusion.

As I said, I'm sure parts from both could be assembled into functional forks but I don't know if the result would be the same length. The problem with that is if the result is shorter than the original configuration something might hit.

Hopefully someone who has compared the actual stanchions from both models will see this and let us know.
 

·
Premium Member
1978 CX500 "The Grub", 1983 GL650I "Nimbus"
Joined
·
12,431 Posts
Are you looking to replace damaged stanchions and have GL500 parts available? Or are you looking for longer forks?
As far as combining the two assemblies, as I said, you'll need to look at the respective parts fiches and compare the damping mechanisms. I've pondered the same question in the past, but never did the requisite digging to find an answer.
 

·
Registered
1982 Honda cx500c
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 · (Edited)
Are you looking to replace damaged stanchions and have GL500 parts available? Or are you looking for longer forks?
As far as combining the two assemblies, as I said, you'll need to look at the respective parts fiches and compare the damping mechanisms. I've pondered the same question in the past, but never did the requisite digging to find an answer.
Yes, aesthetically pleasing longer forks, and comfort. I got this bike late in the season last year and unknowingly rode around with no air in the forks. When I realized there was no air in the system, I added air, the front end rose up, it felt like a different bike. Was much more comfortable and I'm looking to possibly increase that ride feel and the look.

I'll definitely check out the fiches.

Thanks for the responses.
 

·
Registered
1982 Honda cx500c
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I do believe GL500 forks tubes are longer than the 82 CX500's tubes.

I'm wondering what the reasoning/endgame is here for this modification?

Charles.
Endgame would be longer forks. More of a chopper look. Only looking for a few inches more. If and when I replace fork seals, I will seriously consider doing this swap. Just wanted someone to tell me whether or not it bolts right together, for future reference since there is nothing on the internet of anyone doing this. All I have seen is people wanting to shorten their forks, but that's not my speed.
Still waiting for that person who knows.
 

·
Premium Member
1978 CX500 "The Grub", 1983 GL650I "Nimbus"
Joined
·
12,431 Posts
You'll gain yet more length if you swap in the entire GL front end, from the triples down to the wheel. As above, the GL axle sits at the end of the fork lowers, rather than on the leading face, so you'd get another couple inches.
 

·
Premium Member
1978 CX500 "The Grub", 1983 GL650I "Nimbus"
Joined
·
12,431 Posts

·
Registered
CX500 Z 1978 , Rickman Polaris fairing, currently GL500 front, Ignitech etc. subject to change
Joined
·
321 Posts
Because of wear in the original fork of my '98 CX500 I swapped in a complete GL500 front end, swapping the stanchions woud not work because orignals are 33 mm diameter and the GL500 is 35 mm. So swapped the whole front end including the wheel (wider on a GL500). It brings up the whole front about 2 inches because the GL forks are longer. Suspension (as in dealing with holes and bumps) is a lot better now. For handling I raised the stanchions in the Triple tree and it is now acceptable but depends very much on other details as well like springs used and the rear end. If yoy use the GL500 forks as is it will raise the front a couple of inches.

And I would expect the GL500 stanchions to fit a CX500 35mm fork but never tried, all CXś here (Europe) came with 33mm forks.
 
  • Like
Reactions: HondoMoto
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top