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I am preparing to overhaul the front forks on my 500T with 40K on the clock. Any heads up that can be advised will be appreciated. I intend to install progressive fork springs, and want some feedback on the best brand and weight oil to use. I would also like to be advised of any odd pitfalls to avoid during the job. Thanks. I have all the tools and manuals, etc.
 

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The only pitfall that I know to avoid on the 500T is Progressive springs.

I put them on Rat, and it was the worst mistake I ever made on that bike.

At maximum pressure, #4 anti dive setting, it would dive like hell for the first couple inches of travel, then slow down.

It never quite bottomed out, but the ride was not confidence inspiring.



I just had my mechanic rebuild my forks before my wedding.

Right now, I run stock springs with 9 lbs of pressure, and 10 weight silkolene, antidive setting #3. I prefer the suspension to be a little more on the stiff side.



If you prefer a cushier ride, you can get a lighter rate spring from Race Tech and run the forks with little to no pressure and 10 weight Silkolene.



Incidentally, be careful of O-RING E (33.5X2) 91306-MC7-003. (part #57) it is easily damaged on removal, it is discontinued, and a company that claims to manufacture them shipped me a pair that was slightly out of spec and unusable.



(However, you may be able to use a 33x2 Crowder Hydraulic O-ring, which is readily available)
 

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Hi,



I've been using WP spring and oil in the set. After replacing ma CX500TC changed dramatically, I feared before.

Only concern I had was spacer shafts which come with spring didn't match in terms of length. So I needed to

chop off a bit to adjust to fit into.



Another idea is swap other 35mm diameter forks, such as CB750F, and/or CB900F.

Benefit of using these forks is you can terminate TRAC system.
 

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You do not want to go down in size from 37mm to 35mm forks.

Not only is it not cost effective, but it will be a serious handling downgrade.



If you want to disable the TRAC anti-dive system, you'd be better off paying $135.00 for Race Tech cartridge emulators. It's a relatively simple upgrade if you have a drill press.



Basically, you disassemble the fork, drill out four holes and add one more pair to the the pipe seat (also called a damping rod), reassemble the bottom end of the shock, slide in the emulator and the spring, cut the shim down to allow for the new depth of the emulator, and reassemble the top end.

This process completely eliminates the function of the anti-dive system, and gives you the ability to adjust your forks like a modern cartridge system.

The adjustments are more difficult because you have to remove the emulator to adjust the preload, but your compression and rebound damping are adjusted by changing your fork oil weight.
 

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You do not want to go down in size from 37mm to 35mm forks.

Not only is it not cost effective, but it will be a serious handling downgrade.



If you want to disable the TRAC anti-dive system, you'd be better off paying $135.00 for Race Tech cartridge emulators. It's a relatively simple upgrade if you have a drill press.



Basically, you disassemble the fork, drill out four holes and add one more pair to the the pipe seat (also called a damping rod), reassemble the bottom end of the shock, slide in the emulator and the spring, cut the shim down to allow for the new depth of the emulator, and reassemble the top end.

This process completely eliminates the function of the anti-dive system, and gives you the ability to adjust your forks like a modern cartridge system.

The adjustments are more difficult because you have to remove the emulator to adjust the preload, but your compression and rebound damping are adjusted by changing your fork oil weight.
In the 60's when I worked at a Honda shop, one of the worst jobs was changing fork fluid on the old bikes and they naturally had the "kid" doing it. The fish oil/fork oil made the whole shop smell like a bait shop...ah the memories.



Tim, what kind of luck did you have with the Race Tech cartridge? Was it a noticeable difference and more importantly was it worth the money? Did you change springs, if so what did you use?



Ed
 

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I have not done this mod yet (it's in the works for next spring), however, my mechanic has done several anti-dive units, most recently a Gold Wing with the TRAC system.

He showed me the process while he was rebuilding my forks.

It sounds a lot more daunting than it is in actuality.



The vintage racers that I know in the local AFM have done this modification, and they rave about it.

Most of them use the Race Tech springs to get the proper spring rate, but it is completely unnecessary for a 500 turbo (or 500E).

With any standard, deluxe, or custom CX500, you will want to get aftermarket springs as the CX forks are drastically undersprung.



An important note from the racers: once the front suspension is modernized, the same needs to be done to the rear.

If you do not upgrade the rear suspension, the bike's handling characteristics become unbalanced.
 

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I`m running Mobil 1 ATF in the forks with about 13 to 15 PSI Nitrogen in my 500T. I dont ride like I did 20 years ago mind you but the forks handle the small stuff nice and don`t feel too bad at speed in the corners. A fork brace is a must.
 

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You do not want to go down in size from 37mm to 35mm forks.

Not only is it not cost effective, but it will be a serious handling downgrade.



If you want to disable the TRAC anti-dive system, you'd be better off paying $135.00 for Race Tech cartridge emulators. It's a relatively simple upgrade if you have a drill press.



Basically, you disassemble the fork, drill out four holes and add one more pair to the the pipe seat (also called a damping rod), reassemble the bottom end of the shock, slide in the emulator and the spring, cut the shim down to allow for the new depth of the emulator, and reassemble the top end.

This process completely eliminates the function of the anti-dive system, and gives you the ability to adjust your forks like a modern cartridge system.

The adjustments are more difficult because you have to remove the emulator to adjust the preload, but your compression and rebound damping are adjusted by changing your fork oil weight.




Hi, Timothy_d



OK I made a wrong typing, was gonna ment 37mm instead of 35mm. But that'all.
 

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I noticed a big difference in handling after adding a billet fork brace. Interesting enough, the fork brace split completely in half when I crashed. Makes me wonder if the damage to the bike would have been different without it.
 

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Ed H, That's my view, too. That early fork oil was mainly fish oil and it "stunk to high heaven". Probably why a lot of guys changed to ATF, which varies a bit in viscosity in its virgin state. The good thing about ATF is that it doesn't vary in viscosity very much with big changes in temperature, so once you have the forks feeling good, they stay like that over a wide range of temperatures.

And the ATF remains serviceable over a longer period than the other "stuff" - it retains its lubricating qualities far better, and seems to be easier on the seals, too.
 
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