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1982 Honda Silverwing GL500
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Discussion Starter · #41 ·
Hey Randall. With the bike I’m assuming? To be ridden or trailered? Will it hurt to ride that far with the carbs slightly off balance? If not, I will check my schedule here at the shop. :) I’d appreciate it. TM
 

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1978 CX500 "The Grub", 1983 GL650I "Nimbus"
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It shouldn't hurt to ride it a little out of balance. Do a couple shakedown rides close to home, first.
 

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1982 Honda Silverwing GL500
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Discussion Starter · #44 ·
So, I got the bike running decent. I will eventually head to Randall’s to get the carbs synchronized. Unfortunately, Tuesday during a test ride, the front brake locked up. I had to remove the calipers to get the bike home. Upon disassembly, I noticed the fluid is chunky and gritty. I also broke the extremely rusty screws that hold the master cylinder together. I also noticed that the pistons are seized in the calipers. I managed to remove piston in each with compressed air, but the other will not budge. So, I found a new master cylinder online but I am having a hard time locating some new or even used calipers. Any suggestions on how to remove the other pistons would be helpful. Then I can try to rebuild them. Thanks. TM
 

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1978 CX500 "The Grub", 1983 GL650I "Nimbus"
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Reinstall the free piston and insert a wood block in the caliper. When you pressurize the caliper, both pistons should move to that limit. By using successively smaller blocks, ending with a metal putty knife, you should get them both to a point that you can pull them out by hand.
 

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'84 CX650E that is evolving into a GL500
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And if air won't move it try a grease gun. Find a bolt that fits in place of the banjo bolt, drill through it and tap it to accept a zerk fitting for the grease gun and pump it in until the piston moves.
 

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1978, Honda CX500
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And if air won't move it try a grease gun. Find a bolt that fits in place of the banjo bolt, drill through it and tap it to accept a zerk fitting for the grease gun and pump it in until the piston moves.
Else, install it back on the bike and use wooden blocks like Bob suggested with your master. Pump the brakes a few times and will push the pistons out.

Make sure you keep an eye on the master fluid level.
 

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1982 Honda Silverwing GL500
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Discussion Starter · #48 ·
So, I reinstalled the one piston that came out of each caliper. Then i put the brake pads in the caliper to use as the wood. That worked awesome. I took the pistons out and cleaned them up with. Wire wheel. I used brake cleaner to clean out the calipers. The seals still look good so I am gonna try and reuse them. I ordered a new master cylinder, which should be arriving on Thursday. Hopefully I will be able to test ride it again this weekend. :) The brake lines seemed to be clear so I didn’t order those, yet. Parts don’t seem to be that easy to find for this bike. Caliper rebuild kits (just orings) are $80 bucks in Amazon, while the entire master cylinder is less the. $20. Does anyone have a source for parts I can check out? Just wondering. I’ll keep you all posted on how things go. Thanks.
 

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'84 CX650E that is evolving into a GL500
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Your local Honda motorcycle dealer can get a lot of the parts for you. I get a lot of stuff on eBay too.
I almost never buy bike parts on Amazon because their search is crappy. It is so badly biased toward "recommended" (= paid for) results that it is almost impossible to find the best deal.
3 years ago I paid about $20 US for a full kit (all rubber parts) for 2 calipers on eBay. Today the best I can find is

Did you remove every trace of corrosion from the grooves that the rubber rings go in?

BTW: re-using the old rubber parts is false economy at best and can be dangerous. the rubber rings may seem to be in good condition until you compare them to new ones but they will be too stiff to work properly. And the rubber brake lines may allow brake fluid to flow but when you squeeze the lever a significant amount of the effort you apply will be wasted making the brake line expand instead of pressing the pads against the discs.
Ultimately it is your life that is at risk when you chose to have brakes that don't work as well as they should so you have to decide on the level of risk you are willing to accept. All I can tell you is that I wouldn't waste new brake fluid by putting it into 40 year old rubber lines.
 

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Discussion Starter · #50 ·
hey guys. quick update. i was able to order a new master cyliner and installed it. seems to work decent. with that being said, i cleaned and polished the caliper pistons and cleaned up the caliper housing. it looked good, however, when i reinstalled it, it appeared to bleed good, but after i closed off the bleeders and pumped the handle, the pads don't move in on the rotor. the pistons don't appear to be extending from the calipers, on either side. line issue or calipers? this thing is frustrating me, because i was hoping to get to go ride it before winter, but as anyone knows, winter starts in october in minnesota. lol. any other suggestions would be great. thanks guys.
TM
 

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..., it appeared to bleed good, but after i closed off the bleeders and pumped the handle, the pads don't move in on the rotor. ...
TM
After bleeding were you able to hold pressure with the brake lever? If you can and the caliper pistons do not move then I would suspect some error in reassembling the caliper.
 

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Discussion Starter · #52 ·
hi mike. thanks for the quick reply. no, there is no pressure at the handle when i apply the brakes, even "pumping them up". do i need to bleed the master before i attach the line? i've heard of some cars having to have this done, but is it the same for bikes? just wondering. thanks. TM
 

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Ticklle the brake lever so that you can just get the brake switch to click. You should see small bubbles appear in the reservoir when you do this. Once the small bubbles stop the MC should be primed enough to begin pumping a little to start the bleeding process.

Once you have this put a length of clear line on the nipple with the other end in a jar of fluid.

Open the nipple and slowly pump the handle. Fluid should appear at the nipple.

Now close the nipple and start pressure bleeding as normal.
 

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'84 CX650E that is evolving into a GL500
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Did you replace or anneal the sealing washers when you put the brake system back together?
I learned that lesson one weekend when I absolutely needed the bike I was working on ready to drive to work Monday morning and its clutch just wouldn't pump up. All I did was replace the line with a longer one and when I started working on it I had enough new fluid to bleed it several times over but by Saturday night I didn't have much left and there were no stores I could get any from on Sunday so I had a look online to see if others had had similar problems and learned that even the tiniest leak could prevent hydraulics from developing any pressure. Turns out the sealing washers are copper (often chrome plated) and they become work hardened after years under the pressure from the bolt being done up against them and annealing them to return the copper to dead soft condition is very easy, just lay them out on a non-flammable surface (I use a piece of fire brick), heat them with a propane torch until they glow dull red (I learned to do this in the shade bcause the glow isn't vry bright) and when they cool down they are ready to seal again.
 
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