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Discussion Starter #1
just bought this thing for 600$, even managed to drive it home. I’m waiting in the mail for a “new” refurbished carb, as well as ignition coils, spark plugs, oil change, diff. fluid change, as well as updating some lights. This is my first bike, but i have ridden a time or two a year mostly manual quads or little 110 bikes, one thing that surprised me was that the bike is shaft driven. Is there anything I should know about it that’s very different from just a chain and sprocket? I’ve read a little into these bikes and they seem very one off, weird issues at times kind of bikes.
 

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Welcome!
The biggest difference with shaft drive is clean hands. You do need to check the oil level in the final drive from time to time, and be sure to lube the splines in the wheel hub whenever you remount it. There's also a particular sequence to follow when mounting the wheel to keep everything aligned nicely. Otherwise, just easy reliability.

Randall
 

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I like to change the final drive oil every year. Doing that is less work than maintaining a chain for a month of normal use and you never need to kneel in a puddle while doing it like you do with chains.

Welcome to the forum. Please add your bike's model and model year to your signature so that you don't have to remember to tell us every time and we don't have to keep asking when you forget (see Forum Settings link in my signature).

And welcome to the world of antique vehicle ownership (they own us, not the other way around). Your bike is about 4 decades old and the Previous Owners may or may not have done the maintenance necessary to keep it safe & reliable so it is highly recommended to download the Factory Shop Manual for your model (available through the CX Wiki - link in my signature) and go through all of the service procedures, regardless of whether your bike has reached the specified mileage.
I also recommend looking on all rubber parts with suspicion because rubber does not age gracefully. Check the date codes on your tires and replace them if they are over 5 years old no matter how good they look & feel because old rubber simply cannot flow around the irregularities in the asphalt well enough to grip, especially if it is cool or wet. It looks like your bike still has the original rubber brake line(s) (should be replaced every 2 or 3 fluid changes = 5 or 6 years) I recommend shopping for modern stainless braided ones (they last practically forever and double the life of the fluid).

When you start looking at the manual you will notice that your bike has been modified. We have seen s few examples where the person who made the mods didn't know what they were doing and the results were unreliable at best and dangerous at worst so I highly recommend going over everything very carefully to make sure it was done right.
BTW: It looks like that bike was put together with parts from a CX500 and a GL500I. The frame is definitely from a CX500 but CX500s for the US market came with a single front disc but the GL500I (Interstate model with fairing & bags) had 2 discs.
The nameplate on the engine also says GL500. The 1980 CX500 came with Capacitor Discharge Ignition (CDI) which is powered & triggered by special windings on the alternator stator. The GL500 came with Transistor amplifier Ignition (TI or TAI), which is powered by the bike's charging system. There are some major differences between the wiring between the models, including things like the way the kill switch works; It is possible to make a TI engine work with a CDI wiring harness but it would be easier to change the whole harness. It is also possible to convert a TI engine ti CDI by using the CDI engine's rear cover, stator &c.
I think the first thing I would do is figure out what you actually have.

Also, CX500 carbs and GL500 carbs are essentially the same except that the GL ones are mounted closer together. Either of them will work with either engine BUT you need to have the correct manifolds for the carbs you are using. I can't tell from the pics which your bike has but don't be surprised if the ones you have ordered are different from what you have.
 

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Definitely a TI engine, judging by the rear cover. And I see TI igniters in the fifth picture.
CX carbs and intakes. You'd never fit the GL carbs around the CX frame spine.
Definitely a frankenbike. Maybe a running GL rebuilt on a titled CX frame?

Randall
 

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Discussion Starter #5
just got the carb I ordered in, only difference is there is a valve you’ll notice on the new one vs the old one only difference.
would i need to adjust my bike to this difference?
I’m not very familiar with bikes, but the ignition coils that were wired on the bike i looked up and found replacements that were identical. They should be coming in the mail soon, but the old carb was replaced and not rebuilt because i found a wood screw they used instead of a bolt, as well as numerous vacuum leaks from stripped or nonexistent bolts. the butterfly valves for the choke on that carb were also bent and seized up, it was miraculous i was able to ride the bike home lol.
 

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The new carbs have a vacuum port on the right-hand side to connect to a vacuum-actuated petcock ('81 or '82, I think). If your '80 tank doesn't have that, you'll need to cap off this port.
Those are GL500 (and maybe '82 Custom) coils, correct for that engine and ignition.

Randall
 

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Thanks for the response randall, unfortunately it is going to rain in my area the next day or two, so i am waiting till it dries up to put the carb in, and waiting for the coils in the mail.
Hopefully the bike will be running once those are installed, i also am going flushing all fluids and adding new fluid/ bleeding/new filter etc
 

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Good eye Randall. I was trying to see the timing cover on the back of the engine and didn't think of looking for the spark units.

If you are thinking about replacing the brake lines, rebuilding the calipers &c (and you should) it makes more sense to do that all at once rather than bleed them after each step.
 
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