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Discussion Starter #21
Still waiting on Andrei and BBCR Engineering.

Part of the delays were on my end, but at this point he has been MIA on emails for close to 2 months.

Will continue to update.
 

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Discussion Starter #22
Will have updates soon!

I have received (1) of the bobber kits from Andrei, and have a second he is fulfilling right now for the 2nd build.

Also being shipped are two exhausts, a stainless 2 in 1 and steel 2 in 2 with stainless cans. 2 in 2 black wrapped from BBCR Engineering.


All in all, I am disappointed Andrei took so long to fulfill the first order, but we have a better relationship now and it seems he is turning a corner now that the wife is working with him :D

Let's see if he can get this 2nd order out the door as promised.

-Alex
 

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Discussion Starter #23

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Discussion Starter #24
What's up everybody been a while since my last post but I want to see this through to completion and give my thoughts on some of the parts and people providing them. First off, here are a couple pictures of where Bike #1 stands. Going with matte black for the frame and wheels, and silver for other parts (kickstand, center stand, engine hangers, etc).

https://drive.google.com/open?id=1jlmQqmZ2ccvhPehvX3UD3DB5NBND08DU
https://drive.google.com/open?id=1V6e0qcbtTlLpCGZ6giyrMqr1l3X5lvuS

Okay here is my venting / rant on BBCR Engineering and Andrei (the snake).

Dude is a total snake. After taking my payment in full a long time ago, he took like 9 months or so to fulfill the order. It was supposed to be a 2 in 2 exhaust, which he ended up changing to a 2 in 1. He fulfilled dozens of newer orders before mine, and only really took the time to work on my order after I threatened a lawsuit. Despite this original B.S., I decided to give him another shot and placed my order for Bike #2. I also run a business, and I do many different things (solar, bike builds, HVAC, tree work, construction). I would never make promises like Andrei does and not follow through on all of them, but I also would want my clients to give me the benefit of the doubt. I gave him multiple opportunities to make things better, and even placed the second order and he still effed up hardcore and has gone completely MIA with my inquiries on the things he screwed up on.

For order #2, he was supposed to make it a cafe kit (his cafe kit was new at the time of my order, and he ended up sending another bobber kit). He was also supposed to send me a battery box for free, he told me this and even freaking included it on my invoice. The battery box never came. Since this second order he has not answered any of my messages.

Other mixups are his lighting kit doesn't appear to mount anywhere on the seat pan, but I should be able to make something work or I may just use a different product.

What can I say, dude is a total snake. I would NEVER recommend doing business with him, despite his products being cool and his exhausts top notch. I just can't rationalize giving him a dime more of my hard earned money. I will find other vendors for my third and subsequent builds.


Moving forward, I am admittedly excited to see the finished product for these kits, and despite Andrei's complete ineptitude of customer service and following through with his promises, I am a fan of his work.


I have a couple things I am still working out, and some things which don't quite jive.

1.) Center stand does not appear to function anymore with the bobber kit. It appears that the center stand would need to be extended, as it doesn't actually raise the rear wheel off the ground anymore. I do like a center stand, but I could remove it and just rock the kickstand.

2.) Electronics tray: Since I do not have a battery box, and personally do not weld yet, I am exploring some options for an electronics tray. I did purchase a battery box which goes in the usual position (rear underside of engine where CAT mounted for stock exhaust), but it does not hold any of the electronics.

Although I do not weld, I do model in 3D with CAD, and have a buddy with a 3D printer. Thus, I am going to try and model up an electronics tray for under the BBCR seat pan, and move the electronics to this plastic electronics tray. I'll probably put the ignition here as well.

3.) I do want to use an m-Unit eventually, but I am going to try and build the first two without this added expense. I have enough stock parts, and think the electronics tray under the seat pan will work well if I can successfully model it.


Upcoming tasks:

Paint engine, swap clutch springs with stiffer springs for Murray's carbs. I have been doing a lot of elbow grease to prep the engine for the paint job, there are so many cracks and crevices with 40 year old cake. I have been using a combination of old toothbrushes, sand paper, and various cleaning compounds. I opened up the rear engine case, and did a visual inspection of the stator. I did not test it with a multimeter, but with some experience and knowing this bike was a runner when I bought it, I did not swap the stator at this time. I traced out a new gasket from the gasket kit, and can easily open up again and trace a new gasket if the stator does need swapping. The main oil seal and the mechanical seal looked in good shape, I did not want to swap if not necessary.

Parts to order:

More parts for 2nd build, but we will save that for another time :)

Cheers mates!

-Alex
 

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I feel your pain, its disappointing to hear the same story over an over year after year. He would send me tracking #'s for things that never shipped or say that it shipped to the wrong address and then months would go by without parts.

When I was mounting my BBCR kit I put the bike was on the center stand an placed a piece of wood under the rear tire to give me the clearance that I needed before drilling. one option is to try putting either a 1/2" or 3/4" piece of wood under the center stand to determine how much clearance you need and have a shop cut and add a section to the stand. I ended up removing my side stand because I found it to be unstable will all the weight removed from the tail section and would kick out the rear tire. I ended up ditching the tail lights because the suspension was too soft and the tire came in contact with them and took out the whole unit twice. Take a look at my my cx build
 

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Hey Alex, I just realized where you live. I'm from Billerica originally and live over the border in Danville next to Plaistow. If ya ever need a hand or want to check out what I did with mine let me know
 

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Discussion Starter #27 (Edited)
When I was mounting my BBCR kit I put the bike was on the center stand an placed a piece of wood under the rear tire to give me the clearance that I needed before drilling.
Ahhh seems you thought ahead much more than I did! I guess raising it up might be part of your side stand troubles tho? I am fingers crossed that the side stand will work effectively enough to ditch the center stand or leave it there for show. I do not like how leaned over a lot of the bikes look on the side stand after these conversions, but it is the nature of the beast. Either that or they are too long and the bike wants to tip over unless you use on an incline.

one option is to try putting either a 1/2" or 3/4" piece of wood under the center stand to determine how much clearance you need and have a shop cut and add a section to the stand.
I am mulling this over, but the fresh coat of powdercoat, and hefty (but fair) $$$ from my painter is leaning me to not resend it. I may use one of the extra center stands from other bikes, and extend it and send back to the painter. Then I can use this stand for another build provided I reuse the same silver powder color. Decisions decisions...

Take a look at my my cx build
I gave your thread a brief read on my mobile, and will reference moving forward. I like the 3D printed battery box. Amazing to see the printers in action.

Hey Alex, I just realized where you live. I'm from Billerica originally and live over the border in Danville next to Plaistow. If ya ever need a hand or want to check out what I did with mine let me know
No way man cool stuff! I live right over the border, if you pass the Chelmsford forum (ice rink), and bang a left after the route 3 overpass you'll be close to my street near Mill Road. I frequently go to the Plaistow area for some vendors as well. The NH bike scene is pretty nice.

I'm going to be pretty swamped in 2019 with the biz, but when the first builds are done later this year maybe we can hit up a bar for a beer or two with the CXs. Either that or I'll get stuck and need to peek at your build for a sanity check ha!
 

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Hey Alex, one think that always get over looked one these build until after reassembly is the rear brake switch mount. that section of the frame gets cut off. I didn't realize until after everything was back together. I drilled and tapped two small holes in the block off plate and made a little bracket and shortened the spring.
 

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Hey Alex, one think that always get over looked one these build until after reassembly is the rear brake switch mount. that section of the frame gets cut off. I didn't realize until after everything was back together. I drilled and tapped two small holes in the block off plate and made a little bracket and shortened the spring.
You could also use one of the banjo-bolt brake-light switches. Easier to make look nice in my opinion. The M-unit also has an integrated auxiliary brake light switch tied to its accelerometer. Food for thought.
 

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Discussion Starter #30
You could also use one of the banjo-bolt brake-light switches. Easier to make look nice in my opinion. The M-unit also has an integrated auxiliary brake light switch tied to its accelerometer. Food for thought.
The banjo brake light switches are definitely very cool, but remember they require brake fluid! We are working with a drum brake in the rear, so there is no banjo bolt to replace unfortunately. I have seen some links for converting the rear wheel to disk brake, but I am resisting any urge to open those threads hahaha! I actually don't mind the drum, and I'm a front brake heavy rider. Especially with the street bike front ends (R1, GSX-R, etc) I can't justify doing any modification to the rear drum to increase stopping power. There should be plenty of stopping capability with the big dual disk rotors up front.

I'm going to go one step further, and suggest foregoing the rear brake switch entirely. Here in MA it is not a requirement for passing inspection, and I only use the rear brake for heavy stopping scenarios and to keep the bike from rolling back or forward when stopped on an incline, when I want to stretch my right hand and let go of the front brake.

There will be a slight decrease in safety during this scenario, since applying just the rear brake wouldn't illuminate the brake light. But this is a pretty rare situation, and I only do it when stopped with someone else also stopped behind me, so I'm not as worried about a driver coming up and being plowed from behind because my brake light isn't illuminated.


But, elaborating on the m-unit a little bit, I am really trying to build these first two bikes without the m-unit. I have 5 total CX500s, and plenty of spare stock parts. If I can build the first two without an m-unit, then I can splurge a little bit on the final two builds. I will be keeping one CX stock, a promise I made to the owner of the first two bikes I purchased which got me into this CX building frenzy.


Minor update: Finally got the engine cleaned to my satisfaction, and hung where the upper engine hanger bolts on with a ratchet strap. I sprayed a tiny bit of primer to test everything out (I couldn't resist), but am calling it for tonight and will get the workshop heated again tomorrow and go for the first coat of primer.

I saw a neat strategy where someone did multiple coats of primer, then the base coat, allowing the paint to only only to a tacky consistency. He claimed that you can do multiple coats this way, using the tacky surface of the prior coat to adhere to. Basically, you can either leave the coats to dry entirely (12 hours or whatever) , or you just wait 20 minutes and spray on the next coat when the prior one is tacky. This would allow me to bang out the entire paint job in a couple hours. I'm not in too much of a rush here, but thought I'd throw that idea out there if folks wanted to speed up the paint process. Anyone done this method successfully?

-Alex
 

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Discussion Starter #32
The rear brakeswitch is good redundency if the front switch should fail.
True, if you use the rear brake however :p

I also have rear sets I am using, so I am not sure how the rear brake spring will mount up with these rear sets. We shall see.
 

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Discussion Starter #34
I always brake at the rear first.

And I've had two front switches go out in the last year.

I check all my lights before leaving the shed. ;)
You have a better refined riding style than me my friend. I'm probably setting a bad example for the new riders but I don't use the rear brake during casual braking. I don't keep my foot above the rear brake pedal, and prefer the feel of the front braking versus the rear. I've locked up the front a few times, once on my XR 650L back when I was a new rider circa 2011 (I went down), and on my FZ 07 three times. Once I went down, the other two I escaped with only a minor brown spot on my briefs :D.

This is the area of my riding that I am focusing on getting better at, basically to stop the quickest and in the shortest distance one needs to use both the rear and the front brake. So many new bikes have ABS however, and I personally feel like you lose part of the fun and skill of riding a two wheeled motorcycle when ABS is involved. My buddy's BMW R1100S has ABS which throws something like 60% pressure to the front brake, and 40% to the rear automatically. So all he has to do is slam on the front brake and the bike won't lock up and he will skid to a stop the quickest possible. I saw him do this once right next to me and although impressive, I think it is kind of lame and a cop out way of learning how to properly stop a motorcycle.

Engine paint update:

Primer coat #1 is on. There are a couple spots which didn't adhere to my liking. I will wire brush and / or wet sand these down before going back for primer coat #2. My shed is heated via wood stove and soon ductless mini splits. But with just the wood stove it was at 95 deg F and 10% relative humidity when I sprayed on coat #1. I am thinking it may have been a bit too hot and dry and that may have affected the adhesion.

https://drive.google.com/open?id=1uOQu1dH_cCKdTVOLmLzmXx04Q7sTakdz
https://drive.google.com/open?id=1R5q78FBxS1qJXv1qNakVlqlxLU6ItIZR
 

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I learned to ride on dirt. Using the rear is second nature and I generally didn't use much front brake. The rear may not add much to actual braking effort but stabilises the bike. But I notice most riders don't seem to use the rear brake these days. You can tell when they put their right foot down at the lights. With me it'll always be the left.

Was this filth or part of the casting? I've cleaned things like this back before only to find they were actually aluminium rather than dried grease or whatever.

cast.JPG
 

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Discussion Starter #36
I learned to ride on dirt. Using the rear is second nature and I generally didn't use much front brake. The rear may not add much to actual braking effort but stabilises the bike. But I notice most riders don't seem to use the rear brake these days. You can tell when they put their right foot down at the lights. With me it'll always be the left.
Agreed 100%! Left foot down, stretch out my back a bit by letting go of the handlebars, sitting upright, and depressing the rear brake instead of the front. I've also heard riders preach that you should keep the bike in gear and use the clutch when stopped at a traffic light, and not put in neutral. This allows you to quickly maneuver the bike if you see anyone coming your way or whatever. Personally, I'm a whore for neutral. I always find it as I approach a red light in second gear, and I cringe everytime I see a biker with the clutch pulled just sitting there. Talk about wearing out the friction plates and getting a sore wrist. It is a bit safer I'll admit, but with a good level of skill one can quickly throw the bike in gear.

Anyways, to each his or her own. Try to keep the shiny side up, wear proper gear, and practice heavy stopping.

Was this filth or part of the casting? I've cleaned things like this back before only to find they were actually aluminium rather than dried grease or whatever.
Probably a little bit of both. I was rather meticulous to degrease and clean the engine but there is just so much aluminum to cover. Before the second coat of primer I sanded back this section and it got better, but still a bit bumpy and bubbly. I think part of it is the casting as you suggest. I will take another look before the last coat of primer.
 

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I generally use my gears to slow and am already in neutral before I stop .... but it depends what's behind me. If a car is behind me I will stay in first ready to move again ... just in case. If a car approaches from behind once I'm stopped I may go back into gear until they have stopped.

Inconsistent to match inconsistent circumstances I guess.

We are also allowed to filter here so I do that where possible but many of our roads narrow at intersections leaving little room. I also won't filter in moving traffic {law allows up to 20 kmh} or near heavy vehicles.
 

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Discussion Starter #38
Alright I've got about 4 -6 coats of matte black high temp paint down. Some spots I'm not too happy about, but I probably attribute it to missed spots of cleaning, and some coarse areas of the casting. I also didn't sand with 600 grit in between coats, because of how long this would have taken. All in all, she came out pretty decent.

https://drive.google.com/open?id=1E5JzAUod9aCaROcIuKpGCaf8CedikOnF
https://drive.google.com/open?id=1fAYkpmPSVbEWNJDYLFkpVqHhPM_3mvq7
https://drive.google.com/open?id=1F8A6vFqpq0UNU8k-qgMrPkSqtZcoSJCJ

Next up are the coats of high temp clear coat. Only issue here is that my local Autozone did not have satin or flat high temp clear coat, so I had to settle with glossy (for now). I specifically did not go glossy with the powdercoat, so I am pretty aprehensive spraying on a glossy clear coat over a matte black base coat. It kind of feels like I am defeating my strategy here. I may check Advanced Auto Parts, and see if either store may be able to order it in. Either that or go the Amazon Prime route and wait the 2 days. Paint through amazon is usually a bit more expensive unless it is the 6 pack.

Any thoughts on the clear coat here? Interesting enough, the intructions of applying the clear coat are pretty specific compared to the base coat. It mentions doing two light coats first, waiting 10-60 minutes in between applications. It then says to do a heavy wet coat for the third coat, and to do further coating between the 10-60 minutes. If waiting more than 60 minutes, then it instructs to wait 7 days before the next coat. 7 freaking days really? I guess the whole apply when tacky or wait much longer is true with the clear coats.

I am going to get this done in one fell swoop here, and listen to their instructions for multiple coats. I do want to try and get a satin or flat finish clear coat, but I will roll with the glossy if all else fails. At least the base coat is matte.

-Alex
 

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Discussion Starter #39
Update on the electronics tray. I spent a couple hours modeling revision 1 of my tray, and also to scale versions of the electronics going in the tray. If I am missing any, please advise.

To scale parts:
1.) R&R
2.) Ignition Switch
3.) CDI
4.) Starter Solenoid

Prototype:
1.) Electronics Tray (to fit these electronics)

Below are some pictures of the first mockup. Everything fits, but the tray is bulky and there is ample cavity space to rearrange things and hopefully make this have less vertical depth. As it stands, this tray would extend 4" below the bottom of the BBCR seat pan, which I am afraid is most likely going to bottom out with the rear wheel from some other riders stories of the lighting kit Andrei provided. I am hoping to get this down to 2.5-2.75" maximum, which means my components will need to be rearranged.

Also note: The electronics tray model is very crude currently. It doesn't look too appealing, and does not have covers for to close off the sides after the electronics are installed. Consider this a "proof of concept" to be improved as the days and weeks go by that I am finishing up this build and working on bike #2.

Thoughts, concerns, and scrutiny most welcome! :p

https://drive.google.com/open?id=1Z1hm3fUsFHHZhP041zpBQll0Jy-A2jr9
https://drive.google.com/open?id=1iv2bvGIiiTJGeTDg_cs_DEc_bEpZdeyN
https://drive.google.com/open?id=1nFkT493ggfj86qAZC8gkGvb9rmRerQCF
https://drive.google.com/open?id=1tbJdPLvYn1ZjZ63kbdrTW_81z53oQ8rX
 

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I mounted my rectifier under my battery box and starter solenoid behind the battery box. I found that its not usually hard mounting the components but getting all the wiring and connectors tucked away can be tough. just keep that in mind when your designing it. Starter solenoid wires are thick and have limited bend. I will say the way I did mine ends up being 10lbs in a 5lb bag but when its done you don't see any of it.
 
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