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1979 CX500C
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm getting ready to clean my carbs, and the rubber boots are looking a bit cracked (not too bad, but I'm worried that they'll be damaged when I remove the carbs). I'm having trouble finding the part number for the boots in case I need to replace them. I think I have the number for the intake boots, but I can't find the part number for the rear boots that attach to the airbox. Anyone have this or know where I could find it??
 

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They're unavailable anyway but someone is likely to be able to supply a used set if you ask in selling and buying.

EDIT. - RR types faster than I do.... must use more fingers.....
 

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1979 CX500C
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·


They're unavailable anyway but someone is likely to be able to supply a used set if you ask in selling and buying.

EDIT. - RR types faster than I do.... must use more fingers.....
You're right, called the dealership + no luck. Alternatively, anyone know how to clean the carbs WITHOUT taking them off? I know it's possible, but I've heard it's a bitch to get a screwdriver under the float bowl.
 

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If your carbs need cleaning then go ahead and remove them. Proper cleaning is not possible without removing them.
Boots can be repaired in various ways including heat shrink tubing, a slice of bicycle inner tube, Shoo Goo, Flexseal etc.
Warming with a heat gun or hair dryer will make the rubber a little more flexible.
 
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1978 CX500 "The Grub", '83 GL650, '82 GL500 Project "AdventureWing", '79 CX500C, '78 CX500 Scrambler
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I've had success with soaking a couple days in ArmorAll. Just be sure to degrease before sealing any cracks.
 

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Not sure who told you that you can clean the carbs without removing them but I wouldn't take any advice from that person for any work to be done on your motorcycle. You will get better advice here on the forum. If you really want to clean the carbs right, buy Larry's carb book. There are many links to it on this forum. You will not regret doing it right the first time. Many have tried the half assed way of cleaning them and continued to fight getting their bike to run properly with some giving up entirely and yet those that follow Larry's book seem to have great success getting their bikes to run right.
 

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The secret is in the method Larry lays out to clean the carbs idle circuit and to check that it is cleaned.

If you intend to clean your carbs yourself Larrys book is highly recommended.

I have cleaned various types of carbs for years but Larrys book still taught me many things specific to these CV carbs.
 

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'84 CX650E that is evolving into a GL500
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I tried wiping the rubber parts of the manifolds with silicone grease and letting it soak in overnight before wiping off the excess and installing them. I didn't think it had softened them much until I took them back off again a couple of years later and found that they were much more flexible (must have to do with heat/cool cycles drawing the silicone through the rubber).

BTW: Welcome to the forum. Please add your location and your bike's model and model year to your profile so that you don't have to remember to tell us every time and we don't have to keep asking when you forget (see Forum Settings link in my signature).

And welcome to the world of antique vehicle ownership (they own us, not the other way around). Your bike is about 4 decades old and the Previous Owners may or may not have done the maintenance necessary to keep it safe & reliable so it is highly recommended to download the Factory Shop Manual for your model (available through the CX Wiki - link in my signature) and go through all of the service procedures, regardless of whether your bike has reached the specified mileage.
I also recommend looking on all rubber parts with suspicion because rubber does not age gracefully. Check the date codes on your tires and replace them if they are over 5 years old no matter how good they look & feel (old rubber simply cannot flow around the irregularities in the asphalt well enough to grip, especially if it is cool or wet). If your bike still has the original rubber brake line(s) (should be replaced every 2 or 3 fluid changes = 5 or 6 years) I recommend shopping for modern stainless braided ones (they last practically forever and double the life of the fluid). And don't forget things like the rad hoses and the boot between the engine and swingarm (they can crack on the bottom where you don't see it).
 

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1979 CX500C
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I tried wiping the rubber parts of the manifolds with silicone grease and letting it soak in overnight before wiping off the excess and installing them. I didn't think it had softened them much until I took them back off again a couple of years later and found that they were much more flexible (must have to do with heat/cool cycles drawing the silicone through the rubber).

BTW: Welcome to the forum. Please add your location and your bike's model and model year to your profile so that you don't have to remember to tell us every time and we don't have to keep asking when you forget (see Forum Settings link in my signature).

And welcome to the world of antique vehicle ownership (they own us, not the other way around). Your bike is about 4 decades old and the Previous Owners may or may not have done the maintenance necessary to keep it safe & reliable so it is highly recommended to download the Factory Shop Manual for your model (available through the CX Wiki - link in my signature) and go through all of the service procedures, regardless of whether your bike has reached the specified mileage.
I also recommend looking on all rubber parts with suspicion because rubber does not age gracefully. Check the date codes on your tires and replace them if they are over 5 years old no matter how good they look & feel (old rubber simply cannot flow around the irregularities in the asphalt well enough to grip, especially if it is cool or wet). If your bike still has the original rubber brake line(s) (should be replaced every 2 or 3 fluid changes = 5 or 6 years) I recommend shopping for modern stainless braided ones (they last practically forever and double the life of the fluid). And don't forget things like the rad hoses and the boot between the engine and swingarm (they can crack on the bottom where you don't see it).
Thanks for the tips, and for letting me know about the account settings!! Will do that now.

Funny you should mention the brake lines... I noticed THIS MORNING that the date stamp on my front brake line says November 1978... and immediately planned on replacing them ASAP.
 
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