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1978 Honda CX500
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hi All!

New member here living in southern New Hampshire, USA.

I just bought a 1978 Honda CX500 with 4200 original miles! It's my first motorcycle, and after taking the DMV safety courses and getting my license, I'm teaching myself to ride along with some basic motorcycle maintenance.

I bought the bike from a dealer here in NH who acquired it from a collector. From what I know, it had been sitting in a barn as part of a collection for a while before being acquired by the dealer and tuned up to get ready to go.

She's wonderful and I love her already, I've only had the bike about 2 weeks and have already put about 200 miles on her of just casual backroads riding while I get a feel for her.

I'm super grateful to have found this community and appreciate any and all advice or guidance y'all may have for a new rider with an old bike!
 

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1978 CX500 "The Grub", 1983 GL650I "Nimbus"
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12,263 Posts
Welcome aboard, Rosie!
 

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'84 CX650E that is evolving into a GL500
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Welcome to the forum and welcome to the world of antique vehicle ownership (they own us, not the other way around). Your bike is about 4 decades old all good intentions by the collector and the dealer aside and may or may not have had all of the maintenance necessary to keep it safe & reliable so it is highly recommended to download the Factory Shop Manual for your model (available through the CX Wiki - link in my signature) and go through all of the service procedures, regardless of whether your bike has reached the specified mileage.
I also recommend looking on all rubber parts with suspicion because rubber does not age gracefully. Check the date codes on your tires and replace them if they are over 5 years old no matter how good they look & feel (old rubber simply cannot flow around the irregularities in the asphalt well enough to grip, especially if it is cool or wet). If your bike still has the original rubber brake line(s) (should be replaced every 2 or 3 fluid changes = 5 or 6 years) I recommend shopping for modern stainless braided ones (they last practically forever and double the life of the fluid). And don't forget things like the rad hoses and the boot between the engine and swingarm (they can crack on the bottom where you don't see it).
 

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1978 Honda CX500
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8 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Welcome to the forum and welcome to the world of antique vehicle ownership (they own us, not the other way around). Your bike is about 4 decades old all good intentions by the collector and the dealer aside and may or may not have had all of the maintenance necessary to keep it safe & reliable so it is highly recommended to download the Factory Shop Manual for your model (available through the CX Wiki - link in my signature) and go through all of the service procedures, regardless of whether your bike has reached the specified mileage.
I also recommend looking on all rubber parts with suspicion because rubber does not age gracefully. Check the date codes on your tires and replace them if they are over 5 years old no matter how good they look & feel (old rubber simply cannot flow around the irregularities in the asphalt well enough to grip, especially if it is cool or wet). If your bike still has the original rubber brake line(s) (should be replaced every 2 or 3 fluid changes = 5 or 6 years) I recommend shopping for modern stainless braided ones (they last practically forever and double the life of the fluid). And don't forget things like the rad hoses and the boot between the engine and swingarm (they can crack on the bottom where you don't see it).
Great advice! I will be adding it to my weekend to-do list, much appreciated Bob!
 

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Welcome...
As your bikes a 1978 you may want to confirm its had the cam chain tensioner mods.....
Especially if its been a display piece...sitting idle for a while...
 

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Learn how to counter steer. Tight corners at high speeds are a whole lot different than low speed turning. There are many good YouTube videos on the subject. Welcome aboard.
 
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1978 CX500 "The Grub", 1983 GL650I "Nimbus"
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Every rider countersteers, whether they know it or not. It can help to be conscious of it.
 

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'84 CX650E that is evolving into a GL500
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If you know how to swerve on a bicycle thinking about counter steering will only confuse you.

Now, if you were learning to drive a sidecar outfit knowledge about what counter steering is and why it is necessary on 2 wheels would be essential to training yourself NOT to do it.
 

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Welcome to the forum. We love seeing pics of your ride. Cheers.
 
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If you are a new rider, remember this above all else........................you are invisible.
Approach intersections with extreme caution. Expect someone to pull out in front of you and be ready on either the brake or the throttle.
Sooner or later, you will taste the asphalt. Try to do it as slowly as possible.
 
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